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Displaying items by tag: andrew fowler

With Team Lazarus already having used their allocation of 7 sailors for the year and Andrew Fowler prioritizing preparation and qualification for the World Team Racing Championships, to be held in Shull next year, the door is open for John Sheehy and the Royal St George Yacht Club team to sneak through and take the Match Racing Tour title for a second year. A 5th place would leave the teams tied and with the last showdown between the two going to Lazarus the St George team -- rebadged Jodapama Racing for the nationals – need a 4th or better for Marty O'Leary to make it three in a row (Marty also crewed for Nicholas O'Leary in his 2008 championship win).

Shull team racing connections extend beyond the Lazarus absence.Darragh O'Connor is back on the main sheet with Jodapama, Billy Clarke takes to the bow for Casesy Elmes Racing and the boss man him self David Harty lines out for North Sails Ireland. Both Darragh and Billy where on the University of Limerick team that won and finished top Irish team at the IUSA team racing championships in 2009 and 2010. David should be an able stand in for John Downeys as the tours most vociferous questioner of umpiring decisions.

With the championships in Kinsale it's only right that there is a heavy KYC connection for many of the teams. Another graduate from the college ranks, UCD this time, Aiden McLaverty skippers Team ASM-Marine. Exile Same Hunt benefits from the contentious switch of Richie Murphy from Mad Match Racing. Together with Paddy Blaney and Peter Bayly to two make up a Gladiators team that looks extremely strong on paper. Last but not least George Kingston, John Curtan, Ben Scallan and Simon Rattigan take on the mantle of local heros.

5 point on the Tour and just 20 on ISAF ranking separate the final 2 teams. For North Sails Ireland Prof (who's brother Aiden makes up the final element of the Casey Elmes team) and Harty are joined by Barry and Teddy Byrne. Mad Match Racing field an all Howth Yacht Club line-up of Ben Duncan, Ric Morris, Joe Turner and Emmet Ryan.

The first round robin kicks off at 10am on Saturday under the able guidance of Alan Crosbie and chief umpire Mike O'Connor. With fresh weather forecast racing in the outer harbor should be hectic to say the least.

Racing during the day can be followed via the live feed on the matchracing.ie web site with coverage brought to you by Andy Deakin and Cube Images Brian Carlin.

Published in Match Racing

John Sheehy remains Ireland's top-ranked match racer, jumping twelve slots in the international rankings to 73rd in the world. Closing the gap considerably, clubmate Andrew Fowler's win in the most recent Investec Dublin Match Racing Open takes him 55 places higher to 164th, with North Sails helm Maurice O'Connell moving from 285th in the world to number 190, a jump of 95 ranking places.

The Irish rankings can be seen in full here.

Published in News Update

Cork Harbour Information

It’s one of the largest natural harbours in the world – and those living near Cork Harbour insist that it’s also one of the most interesting.

This was the last port of call for the most famous liner in history, the Titanic, but it has been transformed into a centre for the chemical and pharmaceutical industry.

The harbour has been a working port and a strategic defensive hub for centuries, and it has been one of Ireland's major employment hubs since the early 1900s. Traditional heavy industries have waned since the late 20th century, with the likes of the closure of Irish Steel in Haulbowline and shipbuilding at Verolme. It still has major and strategic significance in energy generation, shipping and refining.

Giraffe wander along its shores, from which tens of thousands of men and women left Ireland, most of them never to return. The harbour is home to the oldest yacht club in the world, and to the Irish Navy. 

This deep waterway has also become a vital cog in the Irish economy.

‘Afloat.ie's Cork Harbour page’ is not a history page, nor is it a news focus. It’s simply an exploration of this famous waterway, its colour and its characters.

Cork Harbour Festival

Ocean to City – An Rás Mór and Cork Harbour Open Day formerly existed as two popular one-day events located at different points on Cork’s annual maritime calendar. Both event committees recognised the synergy between the two events and began to work together and share resources. In 2015, Cork Harbour Festival was launched. The festival was shaped on the open day principle, with Ocean to City – An Ras Mór as the flagship event.

Now in its sixth year, the festival has grown from strength to strength. Although the physical 2020 festival was cancelled due to Covid-19, the event normally features nine festival days starting on the first week of June. It is packed full of events; all made possible through collaboration with over 50 different event partners in Cork City, as well as 15 towns and villages along Cork Harbour. The programme grows year by year and highlights Ireland’s rich maritime heritage and culture as well as water and shore-based activities, with Ocean to City – An Rás Mór at the heart of the festival.

Taking place at the centre of Ireland’s maritime paradise, and at the gateway to Ireland’s Ancient East and the Wild Atlantic Way, Cork is perfectly positioned to deliver the largest and most engaging harbour festival in Ireland.

The Cork Harbour Festival Committee includes representatives from Cork City Council, Cork County Council, Port of Cork, UCC MaREI, RCYC, Cobh & Harbour Chamber and Meitheal Mara.

Marinas in Cork Harbour

There are six marinas in Cork Harbour. Three in Crosshaven, one in East Ferry, one in Monkstown Bay and a new facility is opening in 2020 at Cobh. Details below

Port of Cork City Marina

Location – Cork City
Contact – Harbour Masters Dept., Port of Cork Tel: +353 (0)21 4273125 or +353 (0)21 4530466 (out of office hours)

Royal Cork Yacht Club Marina

Location: Crosshaven, Co. Cork
Contact: +353 (0) 21 4831023

Crosshaven Boatyard Marina

Location: Crosshaven, Co. Cork
Contact: +353 (0)21 4831161

Salve Marina Ltd

Location: Crosshaven, Co. Cork
Contact: +353 (0) 21 4831145

Cork Harbour Marina

Location: Monkstown, Co. Cork
Contact: +353 (0)87 3669009

East Ferry Marina

Location: East Ferry, Co. Cork
Contact: +353 (0)21 4813390

New Cove Sailing Club Marina

(to be opened in 2020)

Location: Cobh, Co. Cork
Contact: 087 1178363

Cork Harbour pontoons, slipways and ramps

Cork City Boardwalk Existing pontoon

Port of Cork 100m. pontoon

Cork city – End of Cornmarket St. steps and slip;

Cork city - Proby’s Qy. Existing limited access slip

Quays Bar & Restaurant, Private pontoon and ramp for patrons, suitable for yachts, small craft town and amenities

Cobh harbour [camber] Slip and steps inside quay wall pontoon

Fota (zoo, house, gardens) Derelict pontoon and steps

Haulbowline naval basin; restricted space Naval base; restricted access;

Spike Island pier, steps; slip, pontoon and ramp

Monkstown wooden pier and steps;

Crosshaven town pier, with pontoon & steps

East Ferry Marlogue marina, Slip (Great Island side) visitors’ berths

East Ferry Existing pier and slip; restricted space East Ferry Inn (pub)
(Mainland side)

Blackrock pier and slips

Ballinacurra Quay walls (private)

Aghada pier and slip, pontoon & steps public transport links

Whitegate Slip

Passage West Pontoon

Glenbrook Cross-river ferry

Ringaskiddy Parking with slip and pontoon Ferry terminal; village 1km.

Carrigaloe pier and slip; restricted space; Cross-river ferry;

Fountainstown Slip

White’s Bay beach

Ringabella beach

Glanmire Bridge and tide restrictions

Old Glanmire - Quay