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Displaying items by tag: Tall Ships

#JeanieJohnston - Jeanie Johnston departed Dublin Graving Docks today following the replica 19th barque's most extensive maintenance work since her purchase by the DDDA more than a decade ago, writes Jehan Ashmore.

She is scheduled to resume her famine emigrant museum ship role with tours starting this Saturday (1 November).

Among the work carried out by the dockyard which faces closure as previously reported, was cleaning of her hull, removal of debris notably along the waterline and timber replaced where necessary in addition to repainting.

Graving Dock No.2 was flooded to allow the replica tallship to vacate from the Alexandra Basin based ship-repair facility with tug assistance to her current lay by berth next to the East-Link Bridge.

She will then continue her final short leg upriver with a transit also involving the opening of the Samuel Beckett swing –bridge to moor along her usual Custom House Quay berth.

The visitor attraction which had 20,000 visitors to date this year, tells the story of the famine and the emigrant carrying barque whuch sailed to the New World. Between 1848-1855 she carried more than 2,500 people from Ireland on 16 crossings to North America.

A  bonus for the museum ship has been a rise in Canadian tourists due to more flight capacity. They are drawn to the museum ship as the original Jeanie Johnston was built in Quebec in 1847 along the St. Lawrence River.

 

Published in Tall Ships

#WeatherBound – Following yesterday's 30th anniversary of the East-Link Toll Lift Bridge as previously reported, the UK flagged STV Stavros S. Niarchos and OPV L.E. Aisling (P23) both made transits through the Liffey road crossing this morning, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The departing vessels had moored at neighbouring berths along Sir John Rogersons Quay, from where the Naval Service 'Emer' class OPV firstly vacated having arrived in Dublin Port the previous day.

Within the hour so did the sale-listed STV Stavros S. Niarchos which cast off lines to head downriver having had to delay her departure yesterday due to weather bound conditions. The sail-training vessel is heading for Warrenpoint.

At 60m (197ft) long she is the largest brig built for over a century in the UK when completed in 2000. The brig is the main vessel of the sail training fleet run by the Tall Ships Youth Trust which offers sailing experience for those aged from 18 to 80. She arrived to the capital from last week and to embark new sailing recruits for a voyage that terminates in Liverpool.

As reported before on Afloat.ie, she flies the Stena houseflag as the three-masted vessel is unique among Northern Marine Management (part of the Stena Group) pool of around 130 vessels that include ro-ro tonnage to very large crude carrier (VLCC) tankers.

 

Published in Tall Ships

#TallshipImposter –At first glance anyone along the Liffey this afternoon could be forgiven to conclude Jeanie Johnston was returning from dry-dock to her dedicated northside Liffey berth, however as a tallship sailed up Dublin's city quays she instead notably berthed at the south quays and dismissed any such theory, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The Custom House Quay berth is where Jeanie Johnston is normally stationed as a static museum ship however her dry-docking period has been extended. Originally, the replica barque was due to return next week from Dublin Graving Docks, though on-going maintenance works has re-scheduled her reopening date as a tourist attraction to 1 November.

So what is the identity of this other tallship?... Afloat.ie can reveal she is the STV Stavros S Niarchos, a sail-training vessel and likewise of Jeanie Johnston is also rigged as an 19th century ship but based on that of a brig.

She is visiting Dublin Port on her own business having completed a voyage overnight from Waterford. Her arrival this afternoon followed an en route anchorage off Scotsmens Bay until she berthed in the capital this afternoon at Sir John Rogerson's Quay.

The 60m (200ft) long UK tallship operated by The Tall Ships Youth Trust is understood to have concluded a voyage in the capital and is to embark new sailors on another cruise to Liverpool.

The 493 tonnes vessel was scheduled to depart for Merseyside on Monday, however it would appear this has been changed to the following Tuesday, in which the next voyage of 6 nights taking en route ports is catered for those aged 18 and 80 young! year olds.

The cost of the voyage which requires no sailing experience is £179 sterling (excluding other charges) and where all those who sail with her get to experience setting 18 sails across 5 yards of the masts.

The Trust which was formerly The Sail Training Association, is a registered charity founded in 1956 that is dedicated to the personal development of young people through the crewing of ocean going sail training vessels.

Having taken 100,000 trainees to sea and sailed 1.9 million nautical miles, the Stavros S Niarchos which was completed in 2000 at Appledore Shipbuilders, Devon is currently sale-listed.

As a sail training vessel would the brig be suited as Asgard II's replacement?

 

 

Published in Tall Ships

#JeanieJohnston - Jeanie Johnston which is undergoing maintenance at Dublin Graving Docks Ltd was joined this week by Dutch flagged Arklow Rambler at the ship-repair facility that faces closure by Dublin Port Company over plans to redevelop Alexandra Basin, writes Jehan Ashmore.

As previously reported, Dublin Graving Docks which employs around 26 people at a site within the port estate area of Alexandra Basin is where DPC propose a €200m project to accommodate much bigger cruise ships at a dedicated terminal as outlined at a recent planning hearing by An Bord Pleanála.

Dublin Graving Docks which operates the port-owned 200m long graving dock is the only ship-repairer and conversion business left remaining in the country's largest port.

However the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR) project (see website) for cruise berths would also involve a reconfiguration of other berths throughout the basin. In addition the plans are to enable larger deep-drafted cargoships and more quayside space to include the site of the dry dock.

Currently trade throughput is around 29 million tonnes though the port's strategy is to plan ahead so to handle 40 million tonnes by 2040. This is where the ABR forms phase one of the Dublin Port Company's Masterplan (2012-2040) which sets out the future of the port over the next four decades.

Jeanie Johnston is a replica 19th century barque based on the original built in Quebec Canada in 1847 that transported 2,500 people to North America. Since her acquisition by Dublin Docklands Development Authority (DDDA) in 2005, she has been dry-docked twice at the nearby facility.

The DDDA brought the Tralee registered tallship as part of a river regeneration project and appointed Aiseanna Mara Teoranta on their behalf to operate the vessel as a tourist attraction.

Jeanie_Johnston_dry_dock.jpg

Jeanie Johnston, the replica 19th century barque is undergoing her most extensive maintenance dry-docking since DDDA's purchase in 2002. She is seen as a fresh layer of primer paint is applied to her timber hull. Photo Jehan Ashmore

Last year she welcomed 20,000 visitors and this year there has been a rise in Canadian tourists due to more flights to Ireland, in which they have heard the story on board of how Irish emigrants fled the famine and sought a better life in the New World.

As she lays in Graving Dock No.2, this is a far removed environment to her role at her berth close to the Convention Centre.

Her maintenance programme requires intensive cleaning of her hull, removal of debris notably along the waterline and any replacement of timber plus applying layers of paint. On completion of the work she is to return shipshape and resume her museum role on 1 November.

 

Published in Tall Ships

#JeanieJohnston - The replica 19th barque Jeanie Johnston departed her role as a static famine emigrant museum ship along Dublin's Custom House Quay, as she is to undergo 'essential maintenance', writes Jehan Ashmore.

Jeanie Johnston's short tow downriver was carried out by Dublin Port Company tug sisters, Beaufort and Shackleton, which involved transiting through two bridges, firstly the Samuel Beckett swing-bridge and then the East-Link toll-lift bridge.

The three masted vessel temporally moored alongside the North Quay Wall Extension next to the East-Link where the tugs are stationed. As of this morning she berthed alongside the lead-in jetty of Dublin Graving Docks Ltd's facility within Alexandra Basin. Again this operation involved the pair of tugs in which the Shackleton had only recently vacated the same graving dock.

Due to the dry-docking, tours of the replica tallship will not be available from today, however they are due to resume on 22 October. The 50 minute tours tell the story of how Irish emigrants during the famine departed these shores in the hope of survival and seeking a future in the 'New World'.

The original Jeanie Johnston was built in Quebec, Canada in 1847. She carried more than 2,500 people from Ireland on 16 crossings to North America between 1848 to 1855.

As for the replica, she became the floating museum following a short-lived career 'sailing' around Irish ports and several trips to Spain. Her high-point was the 'reinactment' voyage from Tralee to North America in 2003 with calls to U.S. and Canada.

In 2005, she took part in the Tall Ships Races from Waterford and in that same year she was brought by the Dublin Docklands Development Authority to become her present role as a city-centre tourist attraction.

At the time of her sale by Tralee Town Council and Kerry County Council, there were fears that the barque built in Tralee, Co. Kerry, amid controversial circumstances and cost overruns would be sold abroad and never to return.

Following the sinking of the state owned STV Asgard II in 2008, there were calls for Jeanie Johnston to be reactivated as a sail training vessel to replace the brigantine lost off Brittany.

 

Published in Tall Ships

#Astrid - Engine failure led to the grounding of the tall ship Astrid off the Cork coast a year ago, according to an interim report by marine investigators.

The 42m Dutch brig's 30-strong crew, most of them sail trainees, were rescued in a major operation after it ran onto rocks between Oysterhaven and Kinsale in choppy seas during last summer's ISA-organised Gathering Cruise.

Built in 1918 and in service as a cargo vessel till 1975, the tall ship foundered in the same spot where the barque Falls of Garry sank in 1911.

The Irish Times reports on the Marine Casualty Investigation Board's (MCIB) findings ahead of its final report to come after "the natural justice procedure".

Dutch authorities are involved in the Irish-led investigation that began in the days after the Astrid accident. There is as yet no indication as to what caused the vessel's engine to fail.

Published in Tall Ships
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#TallShips - It's confirmed: Belfast will host the start of 2015's international Tall Ships Races.

According to BBC News, the tall ships will return to Belfast Lough for the first time since 2009 to coincide with next July's Titanic Maritime Festival.

The news follows more than two-and-a-half years from the original announcement by Belfast City Council, which has since secured sponsorship for its hosting of the event from German supermarket chain Lidl.

The tall-masted fleet's return to Irish shores will come three years after Dublin hosted the Tall Ships Races Festival.

BBC News has more on the story HERE.

Published in Tall Ships

#tallship – You come across a reference to an island nation - the 20th largest in the world - that doesn't have a marine policy or a dedicated marine department, and you think it must be some kind of a joke. It's a ship of state without a captain, or a rudder. It adds insult to injury to discover that this same island nation was moved to the verge of bankruptcy after her inhabitants turned their backs on the ocean and invested too heavily in the land.

So much for living in a smart economy.

Not many people living in Ireland realise that it's the third biggest country in Europe, by virtue of her seabed territory of 220 million acres.

Ask any fisherman what EU membership did for our trawler fleet and you will get a quick answer. Ireland has two–thirds of European fishing waters and 3 per cent of the catch. That sell-out, as the fishing community saw it, was the beginning of the end of marine policy in Ireland.

We have in the past been able to blame a lot of our maritime ignorance on the British, with a little justification. Boat ownership by the 'native Irish' was restricted at times, and fishing permitted only by licence. But that was 400 years ago, so we're running out of excuses.

If you're searching for a recent symbol of this marine neglect, look no further than Asgard II. At 30 years old, the boat was at the end of her working life when she sank off the coast of France in 2008.

She was our maritime flagship, a national icon which had given 10,000 young people the chance to go to sea. The insurance money paid out and it went into central exchequer funds. The State showed no interest in replacing her. Until now perhaps?

There has been some sort of maritime awakening in official Ireland. In June, the Government hosted an Ocean Wealth conference declaring millions could be 'harnessed' from our seas in so many ways.

Separately, a new naval patrol vessel has arrived at a cost of E54m. Another one is expected next year. This month the Taoiseach announced he'd ordered a third.

Is it all coincidence or is Ireland moving towards a new marine game plan?

There's no doubting the public's interest in our seas.Just look at the interest in the maritime festivals around our coast this summer and the crowds that came to see Spain's 'Juan Sebastián de Elcano', the world's third largest Tall Ship in Dublin port in June.

Now there is fresh State impetus in the marine, there should in tandem be plans to replace Ireland's Tall Ship, a symbol of our maritime heritage and the possibilities offered in the seas that surround us.

Published in Tall Ships

#TallshipsBerthBoyne-This morning five beautiful tallships are arriving at the mouth of the Boyne for the second Irish Maritime Festival held along the town quays of Drogheda this weekend (13,14 and 15 June), writes Jehan Ashmore.

Once all these tallships are assembled alongside the quays, Drogheda can look forward to officially opening the festival where as previously reported, a special cargo of Scottish Whiskey is on board the classic West Country ketch Bessie Ellen. The 100 year-old built in Plymouth had sailed from Islay to include en route call to Peel on the Isle of Man.

The whiskey bottles are from the Bruichladdich Distillery on the Hebridean island, which are to be presented to the Chairman of the Port Company, the Mayor of Drogheda and the Captain of the Bessie Ellen.

The 'cargo' event is to symbolise and re-establish the historical trading links between Drogheda's town quays and Islay. For more than 500 years, the Louth port can trace the industry of distilling and trading links. Working sailing vessels such as Bessie Ellen would of shipped barley and grain to supply Scottish distilleries dotted along the western Isles.

Following the above launch, the celebration of the seafaring three-day maritime feast is to embark with events among them full-scale 'pirate ships' battling on the river, a coastal rowing race, show-stopping water-sports and the Boyne swim.

A Maritime Pavilion plus a host of cultural and family entertainment will accompany the tallships. Among them the 120-foot long grey-hulled Irene which is to berth on the town quays with the railway viaduct presenting a backdrop of an iconic local landmark.

Also throughout the weekend you can visit the Maritime Education, Enterprise and Careers Centre with the Naval Service represented, to learn more about our coast and environment and the interesting maritime careers available.

Very much keeping to the sea, there will be an urban beach offering the chance to create the ultimate sandcastle while expert sand-sculptors will be at hand working on their creations.

 

Published in Tall Ships

#tallship – American Tall Ship SSV Corwith Cramer is on it's way to Cork from the East Coast of the United States and is due to arrive off Cork Harbour on June 28th.

The school ship will spend a week on the river Lee, the first time the ship has come to Europe.

The Sea Education Association (SEA) that operates the ship is an 'internationally recognised leader in undergraduate ocean education', according to its website. For more than 40 years and over one million nautical miles sailed, the association has educated students about the world's oceans through a fully accredited study abroad programme, SEA Semester.

There is a blog of the transatlantic crossing here.

 

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