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Lecture: ‘Gregor’s Golden Globe Race 2018’

17th February 2019
Gregor McGuckin helming his Golden Globe 2018 yacht with the intention of rescuing an injured fellow competitor. He was under jury rig after capsizing and dismasting in the Southern Ocean. Gregor McGuckin helming his Golden Globe 2018 yacht with the intention of rescuing an injured fellow competitor. He was under jury rig after capsizing and dismasting in the Southern Ocean. Photo: Australian Maritime Safety Board

#lectures - A Glenua talk by Gregor McGuckin entitled: “Gregor’s Golden Globe Race 2018” Thursday 21 February at (20:00hrs) will take place at the Poolbeg Yacht & Boat Club, Ringsend, Dublin 4.

There will be an entry fee of €5 in aid of the RNLI.

In 2018 July, 50 years on from the original Golden Globe legendary race, Gregor McGuckin,set off as one of 18 competitors. In 1968, the sole finisher out of nine entries was Sir RobinKnox -Johnston. Gregor and his fellow competitors were attempting to replicate this race by sailing alone, non-stop around the world, only using technology from the 1960's. This means no GPS, satellite communications, water-makers and modern light-weight materials.

On September 21, after 86 days at sea, in the depths of winter in the Southern Ocean, he and a fellow competitor, Abhilash Tomy, were caught in a ferocious storm. This led to both of them losing their masts after their boats were rolled upside down. According to Gregor: “The whole boat got thrown sideways, everything went dark and I was lying on the roof and stuff lying everywhere”. Undaunted, he put together a jury rig and set out to rescue the badly injured Tomy.

In his illustrated presentation, Gregor will tell the story of the race up to that point and the dramatic multi-national rescue that was to follow.

Jehan Ashmore

About The Author

Jehan Ashmore

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Jehan Ashmore is a marine correspondent, researcher and photographer, specialising in Irish ports, shipping and the ferry sector serving the UK and directly to mainland Europe. Jehan also occasionally writes a column, 'Maritime' Dalkey for the (Dalkey Community Council Newsletter) in addition to contributing to UK marine periodicals. 

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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore. 

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.