Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Surfing

#StormDesmond - With many parts of the country still recovering from the effects of Storm Desmond earlier this month – and Galway in particular facing a €12 million clean-up bill – it might be surprising to learn that some people turned the conditions to their advantage.

But that's exactly what a group of intrepid kayakers did in Ennistymon, Co Clare, as the floodwaters turned part of the Cullenagh River into raging rapids – and local TD Timmy Dooley happened to be there to record it all on video, as the Belfast Telegraph reports.

Elsewhere, Northern Irish big wave surfer Al Mennie wasn't about to pass up the opportunity to paddle out to the 20-foot swells generated by the storm, captured in all their glory in a photo gallery on Uproxx.

Published in Kayaking

#Surfing - An Irish wave enthusiast's 'surfing' video on the streets of Manchester has gone viral.

As the Belfast Telegraph reports, Manchester University student Sean-Caio Dos Santos Corr from Derrylaughan made the clip for the craic after spotting traffic splashing barrel waves onto the pavement on a flooded street.

Waiting for another downpour, Corr and his friend Christian Berger pounced with surfboard, camera and Bermuda shorts at the ready – and the results caught the interest of online viewers across Europe.

"We didn't even intend to take a camera with us we just grabbed it on the way out of the house for a laugh," says Corr.

"And now it's quite funny that people are actually interested in seeing eejits on the side of the road getting splashed in the face by a puddle."

In other surfing news, one of Cornwall's most prominent big-wave surfers has set up shop on Ireland's Wild Atlantic Way to be in prime position for the giant walls of water the current stormy season is bound to throw up.

Tom Lowe tells the Western Morning News how chasing the biggest and best waves for a living often means sleeping on friends' floors – and jetting around the world at a moment's notice - while keeping in peak physical and mental condition

“It’s a complete package," he says. "Your heart has to be in it, your mind has to be in it and you have to be physically stable.”

Published in Surfing
Tagged under

#Surfing - The history of big wave riding at Mullaghmore is the focus of the latest episode of Threading Edges, the new surfing video series from EPIC TV.

As championed by JOE.ie, last week's first episode introduced a number of regular visitors to the Sligo monster describe what makes the swell so special.

But the second part delves more into the relatively recent history of the must-surf destination for the world's most extreme surfers – and one that's helped put Ireland squarely on the world surfing map.

Published in Surfing
Tagged under

#Surfing - One of big wave surfing's best kept secrets off the Clare coast has seen the area named among the top surf spots in the UK and Ireland, as the Clare Herald reports.

Easkey in Co Sligo and The Peak in Bundoran, Co Donegal also made the grade alongside Aileens, a renowned offshore swell only accessible to those in the know, in the list put together by Surfholidays.com.

The Clare Herald has more on the story HERE.

Published in Surfing
Tagged under

#Surfing - Only two surfers retained their titles at a delayed Irish Nationals that saw 13 new champions crowned in Bundoran last weekend, as the Irish Examiner reports.

Marginal surf was forecast for the third of three possible windows for the competition, and indeed the contest director stepped in to move the action to Tullan Strand due to inconsistent waves at The Peak early on Saturday 10 October.

It proved a change for the better, providing "tightly fought" surfing action in the men's final especially, as Sligo's Geared McDaid clinched the title from defending champ Stephen Kilfeather.

The women's division also celebrated a new champion in Sophie Pigot of Lahinch's West Coast Surf Club.

The Irish Examiner has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Surfing

#Surfing - A new surfing exchange programme for young people is promoting cultural relations between the UK and Ireland.

As the Cornish Guardian reports, up to 15 local teenagers will be selected to take part in the Wave Project exchange with Co Donegal, which has the aim of boosting confidence and reducing anxiety through surfing.

The first exchange takes place over next month's half-term holidays in the UK, when 13 Irish youth will stay in Newquay.

They will return the favour next spring over the Easter break when the Cornish teens will stay at a purpose-built facility on the Donegal coast.

The Cornish Guardian has more on the story HERE.

Published in Surfing

#Surfing - Summer might already be a distant memory, but Ireland's surfing season is only just getting under way.

And beyond the bigger wave hotspots like Sligo, which is set to host record-breaker Garrett McNamara at the second Surf Summit this November, there's a wealth of activity happening all around the Irish coast.

Entertainment.ie brings us a round-up of some of the best places for surfing action for all ability levels, including perhaps lesser-known haunts like the Sunny South East.

But the biggest attraction this month is surely the Battle for the Lake kitesurfing festival on Achill Island next weekend (25-27 September), with its entertaining mix of live music from up-and-coming homegrown acts and dazzling displays by Ireland's top kitesurfers.

Published in Surfing

#Surfing - Strandhill in Co Sligo is the number one spot for surfing in Ireland, according to a new celebration of the best towns to catch waves along the Wild Atlantic Way.

In the words of SurfHolidays.com, the small village just six kilometres from Sligo town "is an eclectic mix of surfers, locals and travellers who have now made [it] their home. If you’re looking for a surf trip in Ireland you have found the perfect spot."

It also helps that it's not far from the northwest surfing mecca of Bundoran – which features third on this selection – not to mention the fearsome big waves off Mullaghmore Head.

Running a close second on the list is Lahinch in Co Clare, which splits the difference between the challenging Aileens big wave spot off the coast to the surf at the beach itself, which is "perfect for beginners".

Further north, just to the east of the Wild Atlantic Way's starting point, the quality surfing at Portrush gets a shout-out, as does the "mythical" wave of Inch reef near Ballybunion in Co Clare.

SurfHolidays.com has more on the story HERE.

Published in Surfing
Tagged under

#StandUpPaddle - Jason Conniry is set to make it a first for Cork's An Rás Mór during the Ocean to City Cork Harbour Festival this coming June bank holiday weekend - plying the long-distance rowing course by stand-up paddle board.

As the Irish Examiner reports, the former US lifeguard and longtime surfer, who now resides in Clonakilty, will attempt the shorter 13km race route on his 14ft paddle board just months after surgery for cancer.

He'll be the only 'stand-up guy' among hundreds of rowing boats, kayaks, canoes and even dragon boat teams in the annual race that stretched from Monkstown to the heart of the city in its full 28km length.

“If this goes well, next year I would love to open the race up to prone paddle boarders and we could see up to 100 entries," he said.

The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE – and also carries news of an incredible encounter with a killer whale by a stand-up paddle boarder in New Zealand this week.

Like Reilly was lucky enough to have his GoPro to hand when the inquisitive orca swam right up to his board for a nose around.

"This one bee-lined it for me," he said of the cetacean in the video above. "He popped up about 10cm away from the back of my board. I was a bit nervous thinking, 'what's this guy going to do?'"

Published in Surfing

#Surfing - Two enterprising surfing brothers are one step closer to a £50,000 business grant from Virgin boss Richard Branson.

According to the Belfast Telegraph, Ricky and Chris Martin secured enough votes through the online 'Pitch to Rich' campaign to come first out of 897 businesses in the initial round.

And if they make it through to the final, they could present their Skunk Works Surfboards company to Branson himself, with the chance to persuade him to back their idea.

The Portrush brothers were profiled earlier this year for making the most of Ireland's growing thirst for surfing with their key concept - a custom method for manufacturing much more durable foam surfboards, or 'foamies'.

Already the duo have a manufacturing set-up in place and orders for 200 boards on the books.

But Ricky Martin, who also owns the Alive Surf School in Portrush, says pitching to Branson "could ultimately change how we do things".

The Belfast Telegraph has more on the story HERE.

Published in Surfing
Tagged under
Page 4 of 24

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020