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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Surfing

#Surfing - Ireland's surfing scene gets another tribute in this new short film from surf-wear brand Billabong, via BreakingNews.ie.

Matching the pulsing rhythms of a trad session at Kelly's Bar with breathtaking action from the wild waves off Lahinch in Co Clare was an inspired choice for this clip, produced by the former title sponsors of the annual Big Wave Awards.

That's a contest with a local connection as Lahinch native Ollie O'Flaherty was nominated in 2012 for the massive swell he caught along with Mullaghmore regular Andrew Cotton.

This particular clip, however, features American Shane Dorian with Frenchman Benjamin Sanchis, a recent challenger for the biggest wave of all time, taking on the intimidating water walls of Aileens and Rileys.

Published in Surfing
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#Surfing - Indoor surfing could be on the cards for Derry residents in proposals for new sports facilities the Foyleside city, as the Londonderry Sentinel reports.

A wave-machine-type "surf basin" is one of a number of options for the £20-30 million investment for development of the Templemore and Riversdale sports centres, according to Noel Munnis, head of sports and leisure at Derry City and Strabane District Council.

It would certainly be a popular feature in surfing mad Northern Ireland, what with the big waves of Portrush and Bundoran available within less than a two-hour drive.

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#Surfing - No stranger to lists of the world's top surfing destinations, Bundoran has been cited yet again as a spot no waverider worth their salt will want to miss.

This time the Donegal surfing mecca – set to attract the cream of Europe's surf talent to the Sea Sessions this coming June – is included in All Day's list of 'The Amazing Waves All Surfers Want To Ride'.

"Hardcore surfing enthusiasts don’t let the cold Irish waters stop them from surfing the green waves," says the social news site, which lists Bundoran alongside lesser known sites such as Cloud Nine in the Philippines and Cornwall's Watergate Bay.

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#Lifeboats - Yesterday evening (Monday 6 April), the volunteer crew of Bundoran RNLI were requested by the Irish Coast Guard at Malin Head to launch to a surfer in difficulty.

Shortly after 8pm, a passer-by noticed a female surfer in difficulty off Tullan Strand in Bundoran and immediately dialled 999.

Moments later the lifeboat crew were paged and within four minutes the Atlantic 85 lifeboat was launched from the pier, arriving on scene in under three minutes.



The crew brought the surfer and her surfboard on to the lifeboat and performed a quick medical check finding she was shaken but uninjured. The crew then returned to the station. 



Speaking after their return, lifeboat helm Brian Gillespie said: "We are thankful to the member of the public who did the right thing by calling the coastguard.

"Darkness was beginning to fall and had it been any later the situation may have turned more dangerous. Thankfully the surfer is OK.

"As the weather is getting better, we want people to enjoy themselves but we would urge water users to exercise common sense and heed basic water safety principles.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - Wicklow RNLI's all-weather lifeboat launched at 5.10pm on Saturday (28 March) to assist a kitesurfer in difficulty off Potters Point, south of Wicklow Head.

The kitesurfer was unable to get ashore after leaving the beach at Jack’s Hole. One of his friends saw him in the water and immediately contacted the Irish Coast Guard for help.



Conditions in the area at the time had a south-easterly Force 6 wind with a moderate sea state.


"We located the kitesurfer drifting off the south end of the Wolf Rock near Jack’s Hole," said Wicklow RNLI coxswain Nick Keogh after the callout. "He was using the floatation end of the kite equipment to stay afloat, after he got separated from his board."



A first-aid-trained member of the lifeboat crew assessed the casualty as they returned to Wicklow. He had no injuries and did not require any further medical assistance. The man was landed safely ashore at Wicklow Harbour at 6.30pm.


The crew on the callout were Keogh, mechanic Connie O'Gara, Ciaran Doyle, Terry Sillery, Graham Fitzgerald, John Vize and David Collard.

Arklow's nearby RNLI lifeboat was also requested to launch but was stood down by the coastguard as Wicklow took command of the situation.


Mark Corcoran, Arklow RNLI volunteer lifeboat press officer, hailed the "lightning response by both RNLI volunteer crews at Arklow and Wicklow" which "shows the dedication our volunteers have to saving lives at sea".



Corcoran, who is also Arklow's sea safety officer, added: “All persons who take to the water over the coming summer months must always wear their lifejackets and should always have a means of raising the alarm."

Any groups or individuals who would like advice on any water safety issue from kayaking to sailing, angling, kitesurfing or windsurfing can contact Corcoran at 086 826 0439 or [email protected]

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#Surfing - The biggest cash prize in Irish surfing will be up for grabs again this summer at the Sea Sessions Surf and Music Festival.

As JOE.ie reports, the Expressions Session is set to attract the biggest surfing names in Europe and beyond to Bundoran from 19-21 June for the €3,500 purse claimed last year by 17-year-old GearOid McDaid.

But you won't have to wait that long for the next surfing celebration in Ireland, as the popular Shore Shots film festival returns to the Light House Cinema in Smithfield on 11-12 April.

This year's events includes a live talk hosted by Banter that aims to ask the question: 'What's the story with Irish surfing?'

Big wave luminaries such as Peter Conroy of the Irish Tow Surf Rescue Club, MagicSeaweed editor Ed Temperley and Brian Britton of the legendary Donegal surfing clan will be on hand to discuss what makes Ireland such a strong destination for surfing.

Jim Carroll's On The Record blog has more on the story HERE.

Published in Surfing

#Rescue - A world champion bodyboarder was airlifted to hospital from the base of a Doonbeg cliff earlier this week after suffering an injury in the water off the Clare coast.

The Clare Herald has more on the incident, telling how 36-year-old Australian bodyboard pro Ben Player was injured while bodyboarding near Spanish Point, then fell ill later in the day while watching friends surfing near Doonbeg.

Members of the Irish Tow Surf Rescue Club, who were in the area to keep watch for surfers taking on the challenging Riley's wave, rushed to Player's aid and raised the alarm.

It comes just says after a surfer was rescued from the base of the Cliffs of Moher.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the man was winched to safety by the Sligo coastguard helicopter after getting separated from a group of surfers and winding up on the rocks at the foot of the famous Co Clare cliffs.

Published in Rescue
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#CarTheft - Gardaí have asked the public to be on the lookout for a black Peugeot 207 that was stolen from a Northern Irish couple while they were surfing in Brandon Bay on Friday 13 March.

As The Irish Times reports, Kevin McCullagh and Oonagh Monaghan returned from their surf lesson on the Kerry beach to find that their car, which they had parked nearby on the quiet strand, was gone - and with it all their belongings.

Tralee gardaí are seeking the whereabouts of the black Peugeot 207 hatchback with the UK registration JHZ 7328.

Published in News Update
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#Rescue - The Irish Independent reports that a surfer has been rescued after getting trapped at the foot of the Cliffs of Moher.

What began a search operation for a missing surfer yesterday evening (Saturday 14 March) soon became a rescue effort when the man was found ashore at the base of the 700ft cliffs in Co Clare.

The Sligo coastguard helicopter was able to winch him abroad and airlift him to hospital just before midnight. More HERE.

Published in Rescue

#Surfing - Irish-Aussie surfer Glenn Hall says there's "nothing personal" between him and world surfing champion Gabriel Medina after the latter's outburst over his elimination from the World Surf League season opener.

As the Sydney Morning Herald reports, the Brazilian was seething after an interference call in his heat against Hall confirmed his elimination from the third round.

Medina expressed his frustration at the more than a week spent waiting for suitable waves at Snapper Rocks on Australia's Gold Coast before surfing could even begin.

He also lashed out at Hall for swearing at him in the water - but the New South Wales native dismissed the situation as "a bit of a tight heckle".

Hall, who was born in Australia but competes for Ireland due to his family heritage, is the lone Irish entrant in the new World Surf League, the successor to the ASP World Tour.

Published in Surfing
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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