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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Surfing

#Surfing - The Irish Examiner reports on Easkey Britton's plans to return to Iran this month to establish that country's first ever surf club.

The Donegal surfing champ made history in 2011 when she became the first woman ever to surf in Iran – an extraordinary adventure that was documented by French filmmaker Marion Poizeau.

Since then she's founded Waves of Freedom, a scheme dedicated to teaching women of the remote Baluchistan region how to surf, and she returned to Iran with Poizeau, who shot more footage for a documentary feature, Into The Sea, currently doing the film festival rounds.

Now Britton's going back to the port town of Chabahar on the Makran Coast to help local surfing women set up the country's first surfing club for girls and boys.

And in doing so she's carrying on the pioneering spirit of her father Barry and his brothers Willie, Conor and Brian, who built the foundation of Ireland's own surfing community.

The Irish Examiner has much more on the story HERE.

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#MarineWildlife - This surfing duo off Amble in Northumberland had a surprise partner join in the action, and captured it all on video!

As the clip above shows, the young seal comes out of nowhere as Matt Stanley and Andrew Flounders were paddling in the water - and even leaps onto Matt's board to try it out for himself.

Luckily for the pair, the surfboard had a waterproof camera attached to record the whole thing, so they had evidence to back up their story to the rest of us back on dry land!

Mail Online has more images from the young seal's surfing adventure HERE.

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#Surfing - The video above, via The Score, captures the various surfing adventures of Meath native Maxie Hill, who left Ireland's shores for the waves of Indonesia for what was planned to be a three-month trip.

But five years on, he's still spends much of his time in South East Asia, supporting his surfing habit as a chef Australia - working for Rick Stein, no less.

His short film A Letter To Home is a fitting self-shot tribute to the waves that drive his passion.

That's a passion shared by the Britton brothers of Rossnowlagh in Co Donegal, whose lives changed forever when two of the first surfboards ever used in Ireland fell into their laps in the early 1960s.

The Irish Times recounts the incredible story of these four brothers – Barry, Willie, Conor and Brian – who taught themselves how to surf from movies and magazines, and became the foundation of Ireland's surfing community as we know it today.

If not for them we wouldn't have the Irish Surfing Association as we know it, nor would we have Barry's daughter Easkey Britton, a world-class surfer and pioneer in her own right.

The Britton brothers are the subject of a recent RTÉ Radio documentary, The Beach Boys of Rossnowlagh, that's available to stream or download HERE.

Published in Surfing

#Surfing - The family of an Irish surfer in Australia who went missing after he and two friends were pulled out to sea by a rip current have expressed their hope that he will be returned to them.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the incident prompted a major search and rescue effort in treacherous conditions off Tallow Beach on Byron Bay, south of the Gold Coast in New South Wales last Saturday morning (19 July).

The missing man has since been named by Independent.ie as 20-year-old Stuart Butler from Santry, who had joined two friends, Levi Fahrenholtz (25) from the US and Mike Fuller (19) from England to go boarding at the popular surfing spot.

Fuller managed to reach nearby rocks when the rip current pulled them away from the beach, and Fahrenholz was later rescued after he was swept around Cape Byron, but all trace of Butler's whereabouts was lost.

The North Dubliner is officially listed as a missing person, though it's been confirmed that the search effort is "now a body recovery operation".

Independent.ie has more on the story HERE.

Published in Surfing

#Surfing - The Irish Times reports that the search for an Irish surfer missing since Saturday morning (19 July) off Cape Byron in Australia was suspended earlier today in fading light and treacherous conditions.

The 19-year-old was surfing with two friends when they got caught in a rip current near Tallow Beach, south of the Gold Coast in New South Wales.

One of the two rescued, aged 26, was helped from the water unharmed, while the other, aged 20, was found on nearby rocks with minor injuries.

Local surf clubs have joined in the search and rescue operation attended by helicopters and jet ski crews. The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

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#surfing – Surfing, yoga, belly dancing: it's time to head for the beach and dip your toes in the sea! Lahinch will be heating up as host town to hundreds of women at Mermaids, the Irish Surfing Association's national women's weekend, on the 14/15th June.

The Mermaids weekend is an opportunity to learn to surf - or to improve your skills - under the watchful eyes of some of Ireland's top female surfers. Skilled female surf instructors, alongside past and present female members of the Irish Surf team, will give participants a fun, safe and inspirational surfing experience.

Mermaids is a surfing weekend that provides women (and girls) with an opportunity to meet and share information and advice on surfing while introducing newcomers to the sport in an all female environment. The event brings women of all ages and surfing abilities together in a celebration of women's surfing in Ireland. Whether you are 8 or 80 - if you are interested in surfing, this is an opportunity to learn more!

The weekend is about learning, inspiring others and sharing your excitement and enthusiasm for surfing. Everyone is encouraged to enjoy their time in the water whilst also learning about surfing technique and water safety. Out of the water, new friendships are made and surf stories are shared during the beach lunch, yoga, belly dancing and night time entertainment.

Activities include surfing lessons and coaching (equipment provided); talks on all aspects of surfing; yoga; beach lunch; and belly dancing! There is no requirement to book, just turn up. Attend the full weekend, one day or half a day. Registration between 9am and 3pm on Saturday (last surfing lesson going into the water at 3pm) and 10am-2.00pm (last lesson going into the water at 2pm) on Sunday.

Mermaids is hosted under the Women in Sport Initiative, run by the Irish Sports Council, to encourage more Irish women to participate in sport.

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#Surfing - We've featured surfing dogs on Afloat.ie before, but this video from half-way round the world shows a new champion waveriding pooch with an Irish pedigree.

As The Asahi Shimbun reports, Pinocchio - or Pino for short - is a six-year-old male Irish setter from Kanagawa, Japan who's taken first prize in the animal class of a national surfing contest for four years running.

Once he gets a push-off on his owner Kazuhiro Tsukahara's specially adapted stand-up paddle board, with extra grip for doggy paws, Pino flies solo on the waves alongside his human counterparts, much to the amazement of onlookers.

The Asahi Shimbun has more on the story HERE.

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#Surfing - Organisers of the 2014 Sea Sessions Surf and Music Festival have just announced details of their programme for 27-29 June.

Joining a number of top music acts will be some of the best competitors on the international circuit for Ireland’s 'biggest beach party of the year', which proved a big draw to the Donegal surfing hotspot last year.

The Sea Sessions Expression Session is returning in 2014 with the cream of European performance surfing taking on the best in Ireland.

The event format as usual is 'best move/air' and is organised in a way to allow the surfers to express themselves and push their performance.

“It is a really spectator-friendly format”, said organiser Pete Craig. “Most surf events are quote technical and not really that engaging for non-surfers. This unique format allows for and encourages explosive surfing that everyone can get.”

The competitors will hail from places such as France, Spain, Portugal, the Caribbean, the UK and Ireland.

William Alotti (Saint Martin) is returning to defend his title and is an early favourite. Toby Donachie (UK), who was one of the standout performers last year with some huge boosts, is also returning to challenge Alotti for a total prize pot of €3000.

Noah Lane (AUS) was the dark horse of the event last year, and after having settled in Bundoran, he may have some local knowledge that could aid him this year.

New for 2014 is the Malin Waters Fish Challenge, which will see a selection of local surfers and traveling pros attack the waves in some old-school shapes that have been selected for the event.

On the music side, top international talent will be joining the crème de la crème of Irish acts this year at Sea Sessions with Kelis, The Strypes and The Dandy Warhols all set to perform in Bundoran.

The full music line-up and festive activities can be found at www.SeaSessions.com.

Published in Maritime Festivals

#Surfing - The third annual Long Line Disabled Surf Festival will take place at Limavady's Benone Strand on Saturday 14 June, according to the Londonderry Sentinel.

Afloat.ie previously reported on the inaugural event hosted by the Long Line Surf School in the North Co Derry town, which brought together more than 30 people with disabilities aged from eight to 25, many of whom were trying out surfing for the first time.

Long Line's Dan Lavery says confidence is the key to enjoying surfing, whatever one's differing abilities or experience level - so everyone taking part will have at least one volunteer lifeguard or surf instructor on hand to help them catch the waves.

The Londonderry Sentinel has more on the story HERE.

Published in Surfing

#Surfing - Looking for somewhere to hit the waves as summer's sunny days loom on the horizon?

IrishCentral has got you covered with some spectacular videos of Ireland's top surfing spots.

From the Causeway Coast to the big wave haunts of Donegal and Sligo and the more hidden surfing hubs of the East Coast, there's a spot for surfers of all skill levels.

Published in Surfing
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Page 8 of 24

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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