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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Balbriggan

#RNLI - Skerries RNLI carried out a search of an area north of Balbriggan on Wednesday night (14 August) after a vessel in the area reported sighting a distress flare.

The volunteer crew launched their inshore lifeboat shortly after 9.30pm with Philip Ferguson as helm and crew members Adam Scott, Stephen Crowley and AJ Hughes on board.

Dublin Coast Guard requested the lifeboat to launch to investigate a report of a distress flare north of Balbriggan Harbour in North Co Dublin. 



The lifeboat proceeded directly to the area indicated by the coastguard and conducted an extensive search. Clogherhead RNLI were also tasked and carried out a search further north, while the Skerries Coast Guard unit carried out a search of the coastline in the area.

Just after 10.30pm, the Dublin Coast Guard declared that they were satisfied that a thorough search had been carried out, and with nothing found all units were stood down to return to base.



Speaking after the call-out, Philip Ferguson said: "Conditions were very good on scene and while it was quite a dark night, visibility was reasonably good which helped our search.

"Our volunteer crew are always ready to launch to any sign that somebody is in difficulty at sea and we are happy that on this occasion no lives were in danger."

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - Skerries RNLI went to the assistance of two people whose powerboat got into difficulty off the Balbriggan coast in north Co Dublin yesterday.

Shortly after 6pm last night (Tuesday 19 February) the station’s volunteer lifeboat crew was requested to launch after the alarm was raised by gardaí that a 4-metre speed boat was in difficulty just off Hampton Cove in Balbriggan.


The boat, which was approximately three miles out from Skerries, had fouled its propeller.

Weather conditions at the time were described as cold and dusk was settling into dark.

The 
Skerries RNLI crew put to sea accompanied in the air by the Irish Coast Guard helicopter, which had been on exercise locally.

Arriving on scene, it became apparent that the two people on board had managed to paddle their boat safely to the shoreline. The 
Skerries lifeboat crew proceeded to tow the speedboat back safely to Balbriggan Harbour.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#COASTAL NOTES - The Irish Times reports that Balbriggan Beach was reopened for swimming yesterday 31 August after the latest in a string of E.coli scares around the Irish coast.

The beach at the north Co Dublin coastal town was closed to bathers after a pumping station malfunction caused raw sewage to be pumped into the sea for up to 24 hours earlier this week.

E.coli levels were subsequently recorded at five times the maximum EU safety limit, and as much as 100 times the Blue Flag standard for European beaches.

The incident raised concerns among campaigners opposed to the proposed new water treatment 'super plant' for Fingal.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, worries have been expressed by locals in the towns of Skerries, Loughskinny and Rush about the effects of the planned outfall pipe in their area.

The Balbriggan swimming ban marked the second beach closure in north Dublin during August, after the waters at Rush South were found to be contaminated with E.coli over the bank holiday weekend.

A bathing ban was also imposed on seven beaches in Cork last month due to high levels of the bacteria, while a breach of safe levels at Salthill in Galway last week caused concern ahead of tomorrow's Ironman 70.3 triathlon.

Published in Coastal Notes

#WATER SAFETY - This coming Friday 30 March is the closing date for applications for Fingal County Council beach lifeguards for the 2012 summer season.

Lifeguard cover will be provided on Fingal beaches on weekdays and weekends 11am to 7pm from 2 July till the last week of August, depending on weather and staff levels.

Beaches and bathing places scheduled to be guarded this summer include Balbriggan (front beach), Skerries South, Loughskinny, Rush North and South Shores, Portrane (Tower Bay and The Brook), Donabate, Malahide, Portmarnock, Sutton (Burrow Road) and Howth (Claremount).

Applicants must be not less than 17 years of age on 1 May 2012. Application forms are available to download HERE.

Published in Water Safety

#MARITIME EXHIBITION – The Loughshinny & Rush Historical Society is to host a maritime exhibition of artefacts next Thursday (9th February) at the Bracken Court Hotel, Balbriggan, Co. Dublin.

Many items trawled in the locality of the fishing harbour will be displayed to draw attention to the maritime heritage of the area with a view to assessing interest in a local maritime museum.

School trips have been organised during the day and the exhibition will remain open until 21.00.

For further information contact John Daly Tel: 8105059 or Mob: 086 2603738

Published in Boating Fixtures

#MARINE WILDLIFE - They were thought to have disappeared from the east coast in October after delighting wildlife enthusiasts in Dublin and Wicklow.

But concerns that one of the group had died were swept side when the pod of three bottlenose dolphins was once again spotted off Killiney recently.

The Wicklow People reports that the two adults and one juvenile reappeared almost two weeks ago, and have been seen daily "putting on great displays of leaping, breaching, and tail slapping".

Fears were that tragedy had befallen the group when two bottlenoses were seen off Skerries and Balbriggan in late October, and a juvenile was found dead in Portmarnock shortly after.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, some 200 sightings of the dolphins between Dalkey Island and Wicklow town in recent months were validated by the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG).

According to the IWDG, evidence suggests that the pod is now resident off the east coast.

The Wicklow People has more on the story HERE.

Published in Marine Wildlife

#MARINE WILDLIFE - A harbour seal pup found in a serious condition in Balbriggan last week is new recovering in the care of the Irish Seal Sanctuary.

Colin, as he has been named by ISS volunteers, was discovered on Kings Beach suffering from blood loss and breathing problems, the Fingal Independent reports.

An ISS spokesperson remarked that it was "very unusual" to find harbour seal pups this late in the year, and in an area dominated by colonies of grey seals.

Thanks to medicine donated by the Dogs Aid veterinary clinic in north Dublin, Colin is now "making great progress" though full recovery will take some time.

The seal pup will remain in the care of the ISS until he is fit enough to be returned to Balbriggan for release.

Published in Marine Wildlife
Drogheda Port Company is seeking tenders to carry out geological investigations off Bremore Head near Balbriggan, the Sunday Business Post reports.
The port company and partner Treasury Holdings had been working with Hong Kong-based Hutchison Whampoa on plans for a new port in the north Co Dublin area, set to have a starting freight capacity of 10 million tons per year.
Treasury Holdings says the survey is intended to help avoid developing on a location that could interfere with historic sites, after An Taisce voiced its opposition to any port scheme that would impact on an archaeologial site running from Bremore to the mouth of the River Delvin.
An Taisce is also opposed to another proposed site at Gormanston.
Drogheda Port Company CEO Paul Fleming could not be contacted by the Sunday Business Post to comment on whether the tender indicates a decision to move forward with plans for a port at Bremore.
Minister for Transport Leo Varadkar said he supported the bid to develop a new facility at Bremore, after a previous move to extend the boundaries of Drogheda port were halted by legislative limits that have since been amended.
The Sunday Business Post has more on the story HERE.

Drogheda Port Company is seeking tenders to carry out geological investigations off Bremore Head near Balbriggan, the Sunday Business Post reports.

The port company and partner Treasury Holdings had been working with Hong Kong-based Hutchison Whampoa on plans for a new port in the north Co Dublin area, set to have a starting freight capacity of 10 million tons per year.

Treasury Holdings says the survey is intended to help avoid developing on a location that could interfere with historic sites, after An Taisce voiced its opposition to any port scheme that would impact on an archaeologial site running from Bremore to the mouth of the River Delvin.

An Taisce is also opposed to another proposed site at Gormanston.

Drogheda Port Company CEO Paul Fleming could not be contacted by the Sunday Business Post to comment on whether the tender indicates a decision to move forward with plans for a port at Bremore.

Minister for Transport Leo Varadkar said he supported the bid to develop a new facility at Bremore, after a previous move to extend the boundaries of Drogheda port were halted by legislative limits that have since been amended.

The Sunday Business Post has more on the story HERE.

Published in Ports & Shipping
Drogheda's port company has redrafted its plan to develop a €300 million deepwater harbour in north Dublin.
The semi-State Drogheda Port Company previously failed to get approval from then Transport Minister Noel Dempsey when it first submitted proposals for the port at Bremore, near Balbriggan, in 2009.
The Sunday Business Post reports that the project would require a Ministerial Order to sanction the extension of Drogheda port's boundaries into Co Dublin under the Harbours (Amendment) Act 2009.
Previously any such extension would have been "legally problematic", in the words of Attorney General Paul Gallagher.
No planning application has yet been made, but partners in the venture are reported to be making preparations.
A public consultation on the previous proposals was conducted in September 2009.

Drogheda's port company has redrafted its plan to develop a €300 million deepwater harbour in north Dublin.

The semi-State Drogheda Port Company previously failed to get approval from then Transport Minister Noel Dempsey when it first submitted proposals for the port at Bremore, near Balbriggan, in 2009.

The Sunday Business Post reports that the project would require a Ministerial Order to sanction the extension of Drogheda port's boundaries into Co Dublin under the Harbours (Amendment) Act 2009.

Previously any such extension would have been "legally problematic", in the words of Attorney General Paul Gallagher.

No planning application has yet been made, but partners in the venture are reported to be making preparations.

A public consultation on the previous proposals was conducted in September 2009.

Published in Ports & Shipping

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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