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Displaying items by tag: Baltimore

#lifeboat – On a sunny Easter Sunday Morning, 20th April 2014, both the all weather lifeboat and inshore lifeboat were called upon to give assistance. A yacht had grounded on rocks at a treacherous stretch between Cunnamore Pier and Heir Island in West Cork on a falling tide. The 35ft yacht had 4 people on board at the time. The yacht was well aground when the lifeboats arrived.
The inshore lifeboat RIB crew went aboard the stricken vessel first. A line was secured to the yacht's stern and another line to the masthead. Helm Tadhg Collins on the inshore lifeboat RIB pulled on the masthead line, heeling the yacht over to reduce her draught. Then Coxswain Aidan Bushe on the allweather lifeboat towed the yacht astern to release her from the rocks on which she was wedged.The lifeboat established a tow to bring the yacht to safety. There were no injuries. Winds were fresh North North Easterly.

On the allweather lifeboat Coxswain Aidan Bushe, Mechanic Cathal Cottrell, Eoin Ryan, Ronnie Carthy, Brian MacSweeny, Sean McCarthy, Jerry Smith

On the inshore lifeboat Helm:Tadhg Collins, John Kearney, Jason Pavry

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#Shipping - A cargo ship captain has been fined by Cork District Cork over failing to immediately inform the Irish Coast Guard of engine difficulties suffered by his vessel late last month.

As the Irish Examiner reports, the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport brought the case against Turkish national Mehmet Kaya, captain of the 140m Begonia G that was travelling from Foynes to the Port of Cork with its fertiliser cargo on the evening of 27 February when it lost engine power in poor weather some eight miles off Baltimore.

The court hard that the vessel began to drift towards shore, but Valentia Coast Guard was only made aware of the incident independently some two hours after it began.

Kaya's solicitor entered a guilty plea on the charge of breaching a vessel traffic directive in not informing the coastguard of his ship's loss of manoeuvrability.

The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#dancingRNLI – Despite its battering at the hands of the winter storms Baltimore's maritime community made the best of things by producing an upbeat video to show how resilient the little village is.Filmed on 16th February 2014 hours after storms had ravaged West Cork - this coastal community turned out to dance. Look out for a cast of familiar faces, including a dancing RNLI Lifeboat crew. 

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - Baltimore RNLI assisted three crew members on board a 20m fishing trawler which got into difficulty off West Cork on Monday night (20 January).

The volunteer lifeboat crew was requested to launch their all-weather lifeboat by the Irish Coast Guard at 11.10pm following a report that a 20m trawler had lost steering three quarters of a mile south west of Cape Clear.



The lifeboat, under coxswain Aidan Bushe, launched at 11.18pm and made its way to the scene. Weather conditions at the time were described as blowing force four to five south westerly winds and there was a three metre swell.



Having established a tow line, the lifeboat brought the vessel safely back to Baltimore.



Speaking following the call out, Baltimore RNLI lifeboat operations manager Tom Bushe said: "The vessel encountered difficulties late last night when it was dark and the weather conditions were fairly challenging.

"We were delighted to be able to assist and help the crew bring their vessel to safety." 

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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#RNLI - While most of the country was taking refuge from storm-force winds today (6 January), the volunteer lifeboat crew from Baltimore RNLI was called upon to assist in a medical evacuation from Sherkin Island in West Cork.

The call for assistance came at 12.23pm today when an elderly man suffered a badly broken leg.

The all-weather lifeboat, which is designed for severe weather conditions, safely made its way across Baltimore Harbour to the island, but considerable seamanship skills were required in the transfer of the stretchered casualty as a consequence of the large draw at Sherkin Pier.

Prior to transfer, the man had received medical attention and was strapped to a stretcher immobilising the injured leg.


Baltimore RNLI coxswain Kieran Cotter brought the injured man ashore at the new RNLI station at Bull Point in Baltimore. The man was transferred to an ambulance for further medical attention.


Volunteers onboard the lifeboat with Cotter were mechanic Cathal Cottrell and crew members Aidan Bushe, Jerry Smith, Micheal Cottrell, Pat Collins and Tadgh Collins. Shore crew included Tom Kelly, Ronnie Carthy, Diarmuid Colins and Colin Whooley.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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#rnli – The role of Baltimore in the rescue of 23 people from a steamship called Alondra which was wrecked off the West Cork village in late 1916, is to be featured in an RNLI touring exhibition commemorating the centenary of World War One (WW1). The charity's exhibition, funded by Arts Council England, is called Hope in the Great War and will honour the courage and bravery of the lifeboat crew who risked their lives to save others during WW1.

While a lot of people will be familiar with the sinking of the Lusitania off the Cork coast in 1915, not as many will be aware of this rescue which took place in Baltimore a year later.

A decision by the RNLI charity to establish a lifeboat station at Baltimore was made in 1913 but its actual opening took place in 1919, having been delayed by the First World War.

It was on the 29 December 1916 that the SSAlondra was wrecked on the Kedge Rock, off Baltimore. Sixteen of her crew left in one of the ship's boats, but drowned before reaching the shore. The Venerable Archeacon John Richard Hedge Becher (Honorary Secretary of Baltimore RNLI) and some volunteers launched a boat but it failed to reach the vessel. They returned to Baltimore but put off again as some of the ship's crew had made the rock. Failing to reach the wreck they put back to shore again. At daylight they set out with rocket apparatus. About the same time, two Royal Navy trawlers came upon the scene and the efforts of all, saved 23 survivors some of whom were lowered down a 150 foot cliff.

RNLI Silver Medals for Gallantry were awarded to Archdeacon Becher and Lieutenant Sanderson for their role in helping to rescue the 23 men fromAlondra.

Baltimore's lifesaving story has been chosen to feature alongside five other RNLI lifeboat services that took place in communities across Ireland and the UK. Opening in February 2014 at the Henry Blogg Museum in Norfolk, Hope in the Great Warwill start a four year tour around RNLI museums, lifeboat stations and other museums.

Now the RNLI is asking the local community in Baltimore to get in contact if they know of any details such as family memories, photographs, letters or artefacts connected to the rescue. The most relevant items may be selected to feature within the exhibition allowing the fullest story of the rescue to be told nationally.

Becky Fletcher, RNLI Heritage Project Co-ordinator said: 'The outstanding efforts by Baltimore's RNLI volunteers to save lives in WW1 will now be given a voice. Although little details are known about the SSAlondra rescue, finding any connections would undoubtedly be of further inspiration.'

To pass on any family memories, anecdotes, photos or letters, please [email protected] or call the RNLI Henry Blogg Museum on 01263 511294.

Locally meanwhile, Baltimore RNLI is teaming up with members of the Baltimore Amateur Drama Group to create a piece of artwork for the tour. The group is creating a short film about the rescue which will feature within the exhibition.

Olan Marten, spokesperson for the drama group explains: 'With so many members of the RNLI supporting our productions over the years, as either cast members, crew or audience it is a great honour to do something for them and also to honour the brave men involved in the Alondra rescue. It's an unusual production as the crew and the director will meet for the first time on the first day of filming. Not only that but the film will travel all over Ireland and the UK for four years introducing these local amateur actors to a huge audience.'

Baltimore RNLI will be the second Cork lifeboat station to mark the role it played during World War One. The Courtmacsherry RNLI Lusitania Centenary Committee has already appealed to the public for artefacts, stories and memorabilia to be part of a major exhibition to commemorate the centenary of the sinking of the Lusitania off the Cork coast in 1915. They are also calling on any family members of those lost or saved in the Lusitania tragedy to contact them to share their stories, which will then be compiled and included in the exhibition.

The commemoration will be held on the May Bank holiday weekend 2015 with the centrepiece being a Lusitania Exhibition in Courtmacsherry RNLI Lifeboat Station and other local venues. Courtmacsherry lifeboat responded to the tragedy in 1915 and to coincide with the exhibition, the lifeboat crew will re-enact the call to service and row out to the site of the disaster.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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#RNLI - The role of Baltimore in the rescue of 23 people from the steamship Alondra, wrecked off the West Cork village in late 1916, is to be featured in a touring RNLI exhibition commemorating the centenary of the First World War.

Hope in the Great War, funded by Arts Council England, will honour the courage and bravery of the lifeboat crew who risked their lives to save others during WWI.

While many will be familiar with the sinking of the Lusitania off the Cork coast in 1915, fewer will be aware of this rescue, which took place in Baltimore a year later.

A decision by the RNLI charity to establish a lifeboat station at Baltimore was made in 1913 but its actual opening took place in 1919, having been delayed by the war.

It was on the 29 December 1916 that the SS Alondra was wrecked on the Kedge Rock, off Baltimore. Sixteen of her crew left in one of the ship’s boats, but drowned before reaching the shore.

The Venerable Archeacon John Richard Hedge Becher - honorary secretary of Baltimore RNLI - and some volunteers launched a boat but it failed to reach the vessel. They returned to Baltimore but put off again as some of the ship’s crew had made the rock. Failing to reach the wreck, they put back to shore again.

At daylight they set out with rocket apparatus. About the same time, two Royal Navy trawlers came upon the scene and the efforts of all, saved 23 survivors some of whom were lowered down a 150-foot cliff.

RNLI Silver Medals for Gallantry were awarded to Archdeacon Becher and Lieutenant Sanderson for their role in helping to rescue the 23 men from Alondra.

Baltimore’s lifesaving story has been chosen to feature alongside five other RNLI lifeboat services that took place in communities across Ireland and the UK.

Opening in February 2014 at the Henry Blogg Museum in Norfolk, Hope in the Great War will start a four-year tour around RNLI museums, lifeboat stations and other museums.

Now the RNLI is asking the local community in Baltimore to get in contact if they know of any details such as family memories, photographs, letters or artefacts connected to the rescue. The most relevant items may be selected to feature within the exhibition allowing the fullest story of the rescue to be told nationally.

RNLI heritage project co-ordinator Becky Fletcher said: “The outstanding efforts by Baltimore’s RNLI volunteers to save lives in WW1 will now be given a voice. “Although little details are known about the SS Alondra rescue, finding any connections would undoubtedly be of further inspiration.”

To pass on any family memories, anecdotes, photos or letters, please email [email protected] or call the RNLI Henry Blogg Museum on 01263 511294.

Locally, meanwhile, Baltimore RNLI is teaming up with members of the Baltimore Amateur Drama Group to create a piece of artwork for the tour. The group is creating a short film about the rescue which will feature within the exhibition.

Olan Marten, spokesperson for the drama group, said: “With so many members of the RNLI supporting our productions over the years, as either cast members, crew or audience it is a great honour to do something for them and also to honour the brave men involved in the Alondra rescue.

“It’s an unusual production as the crew and the director will meet for the first time on the first day of filming. Not only that but the film will travel all over Ireland and the UK for four years introducing these local amateur actors to a huge audience.”

Baltimore RNLI will be the second Cork lifeboat station to mark the role it played during the First World War.

The Courtmacsherry RNLI Lusitania Centenary Committee has already appealed to the public for artefacts, stories and memorabilia to be part of a major exhibition to commemorate the centenary of the sinking of the Lusitania off the Cork coast in 1915.

They are also calling on any family members of those lost or saved in the Lusitania tragedy to contact them to share their stories, which will then be compiled and included in the exhibition.

The commemoration will be held on the May Bank holiday weekend in 2015, with the centrepiece being a Lusitania Exhibition in Courtmacsherry RNLI Lifeboat Station and other local venues.

Courtmacsherry lifeboat responded to the tragedy in 1915 - and to coincide with the exhibition, the lifeboat crew will re-enact the call to service and row out to the site of the disaster.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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#RNLI - The crew of Baltimore Lifeboat Station are inviting the public to an open day on Sunday 29 September from 2.30pm to 5.30pm. 

Visitors on the day will have an opportunity to see the redeveloped station house at Bullpoint and the co-located lifeboats operating from there. 

The inshore lifeboat Atlantic 75 RIB Alice and Charles is housed inside the station house on a carriage and the Tamar class all-weather lifeboat Alan Massey lies alongside in a newly excavated berth. 

Crew will be on hand to show people around the station house and the lifeboats as well as giving a first hand account of rescues at sea. Information on RNLI Sea Safety resources will also be made available. 

All are welcome to the open day, which is free of charge.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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#rnli – The Baltimore RNLI inshore lifeboat went to the assistance of a motor cruiser whose engine failed near Horse Island in West Cork this afternoon Tuesday 20th August. The alarm was raised at 15:05 and within minutes the lifeboat was underway. Helm John Kearney and his crew proceeded through the islands of Roaring Water Bay to rendezvous with the stricken vessel which had subsequently anchored between Horse Island and Castle Island.The 6.5m day cruiser whose engine had overheated had a party of 2 men, 2 women and 2 dogs on board at the time and had been on passage from Baltimore to Schull. The lifeboat crew passed a tow to the vessel and took her in tow returning her to her moorings in Baltimore Harbour.

Helm John Kearney commended them for staying calm, he said 'They did everything right, they were wearing life jackets and anchored promptly to secure their safety when her engines failed'.

Helm John Kearney, crew Ger O"Brien and Peter Losberg. Slip crew John O'Flynn, Colin Rochford and Declan Tiernan.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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#RNLI - Two red flare sighting in recent days prompted launches by the Baltimore RNLI volunteer lifeboat crew - the first from the new station at Bullpoint.

On Saturday last (27 July) a red flare was reported after 8pm in the area of Inisbeg on the Ilen River, near Skibbereen in West Cork.

Helm Micheal Cottrell and his crew carried out a search as far upriver as the rowing club, making inquiries with vessels on the river. With no trouble found, the search was stood down and the lifeboat returned to the station at 9.10pm.
 


Then on Tuesday night (30 July) the alarm was raised when a member of the public reported sighting a red flare to the southwest of Tragumna Beach just before 11pm.

The all-weather lifeboat proceeded to Tragumna Bay, where a local fishing boat had already begun a search. Coxswain Kieran Cotter spoke by mobile phone with the observer of the flare, and the lifeboat searched west along the shoreline towards Tragumna Beach in response to the observer's directions.

By midnight nothing had been found, and the search was stood down as all indications were that this was most likely a firework or chinese lantern launched from the headland southwest of Tragumna.
 


Baltimore RNLI lifeboat operations manager Tom Bushe commented that he was "delighted with how the new carriage launching system worked" and thanked the volunteer crew and shore crew for all their hard work in learning new procedures.

Furthermore he advised that if people are setting off fireworks or releasing chinese lanterns in coastal areas to notify the coastguard of their intent.
 


Volunteer crew on board the inshore lifeboat were helm Micheal Cottrell, Tadhg Collins and Connor Dempsey, with shore crew comprising Jerry Smith, Rianne Smith and Seamus O'Driscoll. Volunteer RNLI crew on board the all-weather lifeboat were coxswain Kieran Cotter, mechanic Cathal Cottrell, Jerry Smith, Sean McCarthy, Tadhg Collins, Shane McSweeeny and Eoin Ryan.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Page 14 of 20

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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