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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Canary Islands

The Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG) says it has confirmed its first humpback whale match between Ireland’s waters and the Canary Islands.

Images of a fluke and dorsal fin captured by Alex Brenner at Valle Gran Rey on La Gomera were, with the help of Nick Massett, compared with those of a humpback photographed by IWDG member Simon Duggan at Baltimore in early December 2012.

“On matching the images we can confirm that this is indeed the same individual #HBIRL21, whom we’ve not recorded in Irish waters over the interim nine years,” the IWDG says.

The development marks an important new connection between Ireland and the Spanish island chain off north-west Africa, following earlier links confirmed with key humpback whale breeding grounds off Cape Verde further south.

Published in Marine Wildlife

#nmci – The National Maritime College of Ireland (NMCI), in Cork harbour, is the lead partner in the delivery of the Canary Island's first Offshore Survival Training Centre. A ceremony to mark the partnership will be held in Las Palmas on Friday next, March 27th, hosted by Conor Mowlds, Head of the NMCI, in the presence of the Spanish Minister for Industry, Energy and Tourism, Jose Manual Soria, and Ireland's Honorary Consul in Gran Canaria, Victor Aúz Castro.

The NMCI and SEFtec, one of the world's leading suppliers of offshore simulation equipment and training support consultancy, are the lead consultants and manufacturers for the design, manufacture, development and operation of the Grupo Stier Training Centre in Las Palmas. Expertise from the NMCI and SEFtec have combined to support the development and operation of this centre and are now recognised as world leaders in the sector.

Simon Coveney, TD, Minister for Marine, Agriculture and Defence said, "This is a fantastic example of how Ireland's public and private maritime sectors can work together to deliver manufacturing and consultancy services overseas, creating jobs and revenue for the country and promoting Irish niche-sector expertise on a global platform."

Grupo Stier, who will operate the Offshore Survival Training Centre, have had a presence in the Canary Islands since 1994. Its training arm, Centro de Estudios Marítimos del Atlántico (CEMA) offers practical and innovative training for the next generation of maritime professionals based on the island. For over 20 years CEMA has developed and delivered various programmes, and activities, with an emphasis on maritime studies. The company has trained more than 2,500 alumni from all over the world.

"This project is one of the most exciting we have been involved in, the professionalism and focus of the Group Stier Team is truly impressive and the location of the Training Centre is unequalled. We have committed the full resources and expertise of the NMCI in support of this fantastic initiative and we are proud to be associated with both Group Stier and the Canary Islands" says Conor Mowlds, Head of the NMCI (& MD SEFtec NMCI Offshore Ltd.)

"The NMCI is to the fore in maritime research in Ireland, making it a global leader," said Sean Sherlock, TD, Minister of State for Development, Trade Promotion and North-South Co-operation at the Department of Foreign Affairs.

"Our goal is to further develop a thriving maritime economy, enabling economic growth and creating jobs in our ocean economy. The work of the NMCI complements that goal. Projects like this in the Canary Islands strengthen international bonds and relationships that will lead to even further advancement in the years to come."

The Centre will be located in the Puerto de Taliarte, on land leased to it through a co-operation agreement with the Cabildo de Gran Canaria: it will be completed by April and fully operational by September 2015 providing approved offshore survival training in support of the Canaries growing offshore industry.

Ida Stier, CEO Grupo Stier said: "After 20 years providing training services in the shipping market, Grupo Stier is very excited to develop this project with the support of NMCI, SEFtec and the Cabildo/City Hall de Gran Canaria, as this will give the opportunity to train local people for the offshore business and will contribute to the Islands in the development of the offshore industry."

"It is always exciting to work with ground breaking companies who are willing to introduce new products and services" said Darren O'Sullivan, Director SEFtec, "It is my strong belief that the Canaries and the Oil gas sector will benefit greatly from Grupo Stiers investment and vision"

Published in Cork Harbour

#CruiseLiners - The Guardian reports that five crew members on a British-operated cruise liner in the Canary Islands have died after a lifeboat fell 17 metres from the side of the ship and overturned during an emergency drill.

The crew - believed to include Indonesians, a Filipino and a Ghanaian - are thought to have been on board the lifeboat as it was being lowered from the vessel at the time of the incident.

Lifeboat launch drills are notorious for accidents, according to seafarers' union Nautilus International, who added that "there's been research which suggests that more people are dying in lifeboat drills than are being saved by lifeboats."

The Canary Islands are a popular holiday destination for people from Ireland and all over Europe seeking some winter sunshine. Reports say 2,000 passengers were on the cruise ship at the time but none were involved in the emergency drill.

The Guardian has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Cruise Liners

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020

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