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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Canoeing Ireland

Waterways Ireland advises that a Canoeing Ireland selection event will take place this Saturday 3 April on the Grand Canal at the Celbridge Paddlers Canoe Club–Alymer’s Bridge area.

This event is part of the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic qualification pathway and has been deemed an essential activity by Sport Ireland.

Masters of power boats are requested to navigate with due caution and obey all instructions from event stewards.

Published in Canoeing

#Canoeing: The inaugural Canoeing Ireland National Awards at the Spa Hotel in Lucan on Saturday night were a success. The prizes were spread across a range of disciplines, with young competitors to the fore. Jenny Egan and Ronan Foley were honoured in both sprint and marathon categories. One of the most popular awards on the night went to Aido Barber of canoe polo. He was named the volunteer of the year.

 The keynote speaker was the president of the Olympic Federation of Ireland, Sarah Keane.  

Canoeing Ireland National Awards

Freestyle: Senior Male: Dave McClure. Junior Female: Aoife Hanrahan, Junior Male: Sean Noonan.  

Marathon: Sen: Jenny Egan, Barry Watkins. Jun: Ronan Foley

Polo: Sen: Rachel Molloy, Mark McCormack. Jun: Ciara Gurrhy, Zeke Wilson.

Slalom: Sen: Aisling Conlan, Liam Jegou. Jun: Maeve Martin, Tom Morley.

Sprint: Sen: Jenny Egan, Patrick O’Leary (paracanoeist). Jun: Kate McCarthy, Ronan Foley.  

Surf: Sen: Aisling Griffin, Michael Barry. Jun: Megan Gamble, Jamie O’Brien

Whitewater: Darragh Clarke (junior male)

Community Impact: Kilkenny Aqua Canoe Club

Event of the Year: UCD Varsities

Team of the Year: Kilcock Demons

Volunteer of the Year: Aidrian Barber

Published in Canoeing

#Canoeing: Jon Mackey is to head up high performance at Canoeing Ireland. Mackey, who works as training and development officer at Canoeing Ireland, is national coach for Kickboxing Ireland. In this role he guided the Ireland team to fourth place on the medals table at the junior World Championships in Jesolo in Italy in September. He is also studying for a Masters in coaching science in sport at UCD.  

 Mackey said he was looking forward to his new role and that Irish canoeing had some of its best results on the international stage this year. “We have a team with huge potential and I look forward to working along side them as we endeavour to make our mark on the European, world and Olympic stage.”

 Paddy Boyd, the outgoing ceo of Canoeing Ireland, said the appointment addressed a need. “There is undoubted paddling talent in Ireland, borne out by recent results. It is incumbent on Canoeing Ireland to provide the support for our ambitious young athletes.”

Published in Canoeing

#Kayaking - The Irish Times has a preview of Ireland’s largest junior kayaking race — and one of the biggest events in some time for Canoeing Ireland — which takes place on the River Liffey tomorrow (Saturday 19 May).

The Junior Liffey Descent is set to bring more than 160 young paddlers to Leixlip for racing to Strawberry Beds across 19 categories in four boat classes tomorrow afternoon.

Published in Kayaking

#Canoeing: Paddy Boyd, who was previously the chief executive of the Irish Sailing Association, has been appointed as interim chief executive of Canoeing Ireland. The Dún Laoghaire man will run the organisation until a full-time chief executive is apppointed.

Boyd, who is a master mariner by profession, was chief executive of the ISA for 16 years until the end of 2004. Under the Dún Laoghaire man, the sport grew, and he was an important agent in the professionalisation of the association.

From 2009 to 2015 Boyd served as chief executive of Sail Canada.

Sport Ireland hopes that a new, full-time, ceo will be appointed in the medium term. “I’m here to help out for a few months,” Boyd said.

The previous chief executive of Canoeing Ireland was Karl Dunne.

Published in Canoeing

#Canoeing - Richmond Harbour on the Royal Canal in Clondra, Co Longford will be the site of the Canoeing Ireland Club Championships over the weekend of 16-17 April.

As the Longford Leader reports, the event coincides with the second annual Longford Blueway Festival taking place in the town and surrounds.

Up to 500 competitors and their supporters are expected in Clondra for the national canoeing contest which joins a number of events scheduled for the weekend, including cycles and walks of the 10km Camlin Loop of the Shannon Blueway that was launched last year, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

There will also be public 'taster sessions' on the water for those curious about canoeing whether for sport or recreation. Details are available on the Canoeing Ireland website.

The Longford Leader has more on the story HERE.

Published in Canoeing

#Canoeing: Canoeing Ireland has appointed Karl Dunne as its new chief executive. Dunne has been the general manager of the body since March 2012. The recruitment process for the new post was, according to Canoeing Ireland, undertaken by independent HR Consultants as part of an organisational restructuring programme.

 Paul Donnelly, the president of Canoeing Ireland, said: “I am pleased that this important position of CEO of Canoeing Ireland has been filled. One of the CEO’s first tasks will be to finalise the development and implementation of a new Strategic Plan for the organisation to guide its development and expansion into the future. The Board look forward to working in cooperation with the CEO and his dedicated staff in meeting the challenges and opportunities which lie ahead.”

Dunne said: “It is an honour to be appointed to the role of CEO with Canoeing Ireland. Canoeing in Ireland has a proud history of both performance and participation and I look forward to working with the board and staff of the organisation and our partner agencies for the benefit of our members. Canoeing is a fantastic community sport that is very accessible. It is my priority to grow participation levels in the sport across the country.”

 Canoeing Ireland is the governing body for the 70 affiliated clubs in the Republic of Ireland.

Published in Canoeing

#Canoeing - Canoeing Ireland is recruiting a Youth & Club Development Officer to develop youth participation in canoeing and increase both the quantity and quality of canoe clubs in Ireland.


The successful candidate will be in charge of managing the Canoeing Ireland Training Centre with a focus on youth participation, which includes managing delivery of the instructor training initiative in view of club development.

They will also be expected to deliver junior training programmes – and a schools, scouts and youth competition calendar – across a broad range of disciplines.

Managing and delivering adult training programmes to kick start club growth and development will also be part of their remit, as will reviewing and developing new Canoeing Ireland club support materials, including the Club Kick Start Pack, sample constitution and sample SOPs and risk assessments.

Among the biggest requirements will be establishing a Canoeing Ireland Youth Kayaking Academy at the body's training centre at Strawberry Beds as a pilot project to be rolled out to towns and cities nationwide.

The successful candidate will also be expected to contribute at strategic events such as the Liffey Descent and junior and senior Paddlefests, as well as produce content for Canoeing Ireland's print and social media platforms.

Applicants must have at least a level 3 kayak instructorship, a full clean minibus driver's licence, a current CI-recognised first aid cert and a Coaching Ireland tutor qualification, among other requirements. All applications are also subject to Garda vetting clearance.

Full details on this role and how to apply are available via the Canoeing Ireland website HERE - which also has details on a vacancy for an administration officer. Applications must be received by Friday 16 January 2015.

Published in Canoeing

#Canoeing - Canoeing Ireland is one of five sporting organisation to share in a €125,000 grant from the Coca-Cola Thank You Fund, as Business & Leadership reports.

The €25,000 to Irish canoeing's governing body comes via the soft drinks giant's initiative "aimed at encouraging people to incorporate physical activity into their day to day lives".

It's expected that Canoeing Ireland's share of the grant will help train a range of kayak instructors to get more young people interested in taking up the paddle.

Published in Canoeing
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#Canoeing - With para-canoeing set to join the list of sports at the Rio Paralympics in 2016, Canoeing Ireland says it is keen to develop the sport and identify and support athletes with hopes of representing Ireland.

That was the message from Canoeing Ireland's Olympic Sprint chairman Eamon Fleming, who was on hand to thank Paralympics Ireland for accepting Canoeing Ireland into the Paralympics family at an event last week.

"We are very excited to be a part of the Paralympics family and see great potential in growing para-canoeing in the future," he said.

According to Fleming, he and Ireland's canoe sports governing body "were inspired to see para-canoeist Patrick O'Leary finished second in the men's 200m event in very tough conditions" at the first sprint regatta of the year in Nottingham last weekend.

Also now paddling his own canoe for Rio is two-time rowing Paralympian Kevin Du Toit, who is currently training out of Richmond Canoe Club in London – a home away from home for Irish paddlers over the years.

Karl Dunne, CEO of Canoeing Ireland, said: "We are delighted to have had instant success with Patrick's result in Nottingham, He will now compete at the European Championships in Portugal this summer.

"Canoeing Ireland look forward to working with Liam and his team on the road to Rio."

Published in Canoeing
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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