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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Dingle

A Kerry county councillor says it's appropriate that a vessel to be named after Kerry's Antarctic explorer would officially take place in the county.

The Marine Institute has commissioned a new research vessel, which is to be named the RV Tom Crean in honour of the explorer.

In 1893 at the age of 16, Tom Crean departed Minard in Lispole and joined the Royal Navy.

In the early 1900s, he was part of three British expeditions which had hoped to be the first to reach the South Pole.

He received an Albert Medal for his lifesaving efforts during the final expedition.

Last year, the Marine Institute commissioned a research vessel, which they intend to name the RV Tom Crean as revealed by Afloat back in January.

For more on the councillor's call, click onto Radio Kerry's coverage in addition the last update on the newbuild's progress. 

Published in RV Tom Crean

Dingle will host a special commemoration for Fungie the dolphin this month, as the Irish Independent reports.

Fungie took up residence in the Co Kerry harbour in 1983 and over the decades since formed the backbone of the town’s tourism-based economy.

But the bottlenose dolphin disappeared in mid October last year — and marine experts suggest he either died or relocated to waters where he’s yet to be traced.

One year on and a special commemoration day is planned in Dingle on Sunday 17 October to celebrate the dolphin who put the town on the map.

Free boat trips around the harbour entrance will be offered, with donations welcome to support Dingle Coast and Rescue and Mallow Search and Rescue.

“We want to celebrate the magic that Fungie brought to Dingle and to people from all over the world,” said local resident Jamie Flannery.

The Irish Independent has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastal Notes
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It was discussed in the Seanad on Wednesday the fifth of March in 2003…..

Senator Joe O'Toole, a teacher by profession was an Independent Senator, served as General Secretary of the National Teachers Organisation and President of the Congress of Trade Unions… and came from Dingle...

So, he suggested to another Kerryman, then Sports Minister John O'Donogue, that Dingle would be a good base for the Cup to be sailed… It had just been concluded in Auckland, won by Switzerland… It would bring a billion to the west…. marinas in Cahirciveen, Fenit and Kilrush and, of course, Dingle, Would support it, he said.

The America's Cup didn't come to Dingle … The Minister for Sport at the time wasn't rushing to secure it, as I remember covering that story for RTE….

Now I'm tired of being asked to support various campaigns underway to get the AC for Cork and tired too of being described as a "begrudger" when I raise questions about it and also tired of being called "elitist" when defending sailing.

I believe in sailing as a "sport for all" ….. I don't like sailing being described as "elitist" and that is increasing – arising from the AC proposal.

Supporters of the 'AC for Cork' haven't acknowledged 2024 also as an Olympics Year in Paris…. Should the America's Cup, in which no Irish team is likely to be taking part because it couldn't be afforded, get many millions of taxpayer-funded Euros when there is still not enough State support for Irish sailors taking part in the Olympics?

Which would be of more benefit to the sport?

Pointing to the Round the World Race in Galway overlooks that, while big crowds attended the 'festival' around the event --- and there was an Irish boat involved…. it left unpaid bills behind for a while and that caused some resentment ….

Ireland's brigantine Asgard II at the Australian 200th celebrationsIreland's brigantine Asgard II at the Australian 200th celebrations

So, what about the photo of Asgard printed here, which in the past week appeared on social media, posted by the well-known, renowned Gerry Burns…

Asgard at the Australian 200th celebrations – "a great ambassador for Ireland" – the value of teaching hundreds of young people from all sectors of life the wide value of sailing ….and never given enough dedicated State support by the Department of Defence whose responsibility it was and with a Minister, Willie O'Dea, who wouldn't give the insurance compensation money for its sinking to replace it….

If there are millions available for a maritime event, why wouldn't it be put into leisure maritime development around the Irish coast?

The Tall Ships Races brought crowds and economic benefits to Cork, Dublin and Waterford, where there were three Irish tall ships taking part… now we have none actively sailing… so much for the continued support of sailing…

The AC has become a big commercial business, where money dictates more than sailing….. where the attempt seems to be to bulldoze Ireland into taking on a massive cost in a short timeframe … and helping to pay for the New Zealand defence which, if Team New Zealand can't find a location, could end up in another AC legal wrangle…

The America's Cup has become a big commercial businessThe America's Cup has become a big commercial business

If there are millions available for a maritime event, why wouldn't it be put into leisure maritime development around the Irish coast – more public marine leisure facilities, marinas, which might bring many more visitors, more regularly or club development to encourage more public involvement and rid sailing of that 'elitist' tag…..

When the government of the leading sailing nation in the world won't give the AC organisation in its own country the amount of money they want to hold the event in Auckland, I wonder who may end up being mugs for the elite of the AC? 

Published in Tom MacSweeney
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Marine Minister Charlie McConalogue has continued his series of visits to some of Ireland’s main fishing ports, spending yesterday and today (Thursday 16 and Friday 17 September) in Co Kerry.

The minister met with fishers, fishing organisations and other stakeholders as he visited the ports of Dingle, Fenit and Cromane.

These visits follow on from the minister’s trips during the summer to Howth, Kilmore Quay, Dunmore East, Killybegs, Union Hall and Castletownbere.

In Fenit, the minister met with local fishers to discuss fishing matters. The Marine Institute and local stakeholders updated on conservation initiatives and measures for crayfish along the Co Kerry coastline and outlined protection measures for angel shark, skates and rays, particularly in the Tralee Bay area.

A public consultation on the crayfish fishery was launched last month to gather views on measures targeted at eliminating the by-catch of endangered species while seeking to secure a viable and sustainable future for the fishery. The consultation concluded yesterday.

Later the minister visited Dingle Fishery Harbour Centre and met the harbour master. Since 2010, €17.4 million has been invested in the development and maintenance of Dingle FHC under the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine’s Fishery Harbour and Coastal Infrastructure Capital Programme.

In Dingle, the minister also met with local fishers and representatives of the seafood and broader marine sector including the Dingle Innovation Hub and the Dingle Aquarium.

In Cromane, the minster met with, and heard the views of the local community regarding a landing facility.

Commenting on the visits, Minister McConalogue said: “I have had constructive meetings with fishers, aquaculture farmers and other stakeholders during my visit to Kerry today, and I thank everyone for meeting me to discuss matters important to their communities.

“It is a great opportunity for me to hear directly from marine stakeholders who are central in ensuring the long-term vibrancy of our coastal communities.”

Published in Fishing
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Valentia RNLI volunteers launched their all-weather lifeboat yesterday (Saturday 17 July) to assist an 11-metre yacht with two people onboard, which required assistance.

At 4.46 pm the Valentia Coast Guard requested Valentia RNLI’s volunteer crew to launch the all-weather lifeboat to assess the situation of an 11-metre yacht with machinery failure. The yacht with two people onboard was 3 miles southwest of Dingle Harbour. Weather conditions at the time we described as good visibility, one metre swell with a gentle breeze force three south-westerly wind.

At the location, the RNLI crew came alongside the vessel to assess the situation and ensure all occupants onboard were safe. Our Coxswain made the decision that undertaking a tow was necessary and the safest way to assist the casualties. The towed vessel was returned to the nearest and safe and suitable port at Dingle Marina.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Dingle’s boatmen have been hit hard by the double whammy of pandemic restrictions on the tourism trade and the disappearance of Fungie last autumn.

But as the Business Post reports, the boatmen of the Kerry Gaeltacht town have directed their ire at the Government for what they believe is a failure to support their industry — such as the absence of a freeze on harbour fees.

Dingle Sea Safari owner Jimmy Flannery says: “It looks like, once again, when it comes to the marine sector, they don’t give a damn.”

The Business Post has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastal Notes
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A video circulating online of a dolphin frolicking in Galway Bay is “extremely unlikely” to be the missing bottlenose Fungie, as the Irish Examiner reports.

The footage sparked hopes that Dingle’s famous long-term marine wildlife resident had reappeared nearly five months after his last sighting in the Co Kerry town.

But Nic Slocum of Whale Watch West Cork said that while it was impossible to be “absolutely sure”, there were enough indications that it was not the same animal as Fungie, with a smaller body and shorter beak.

“They both jump, and they both jump in that way. And I know everybody got a little bit excited because they thought it might be Fungie showing himself again,” Slocum said.

“From my perspective, I would say that it is extremely unlikely to be Fungie and far more likely to be a short beak common dolphin.”

The Irish Examiner has more on the store HERE.

Published in Marine Wildlife
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Efforts to drive tourism in the Dingle Peninsula may be doing more harm than good, according to a newly published report.

As the Irish Independent reports, the Fáilte Ireland Visitor Experience Development Plan — which was completed before the disappearance of Fungie the dolphin, a major draw for Dingle — suggests that despite “huge” traffic volumes in the region, they result in little spend.

It highlights that Dingle town itself has been the focus of tourism investment at the expense of other communities on the Co Kerry peninsula — and that previous decision-makers had failed to capitalise on the potential for wider heritage and cultural tourism.

Moreover, it warns that the sheer numbers of people passing through in coaches and private vehicles are putting significant pressure on the local environment.

The plan says: “The potential socio-economic benefits of tourism are not currently being realised and it is widely regarded that tourism on the Dingle Peninsula is at a crossroads.”

The Irish Independent has more on the story HERE.

Published in Aquatic Tourism
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A teenage boy has died in a tragic accident after a fall from a coastal cliff on the Dingle Peninsula, as RTÉ News reports.

It’s understood that the 17-year-old slipped and fell while out walking with his family at Cinn Aird, east of Dingle, this afternoon (Sunday 3 January).

A multiagency emergency response was launched, and the crew of the Shannon-based Irish Coast Guard helicopter Rescue 115 located the teenager at the foot of the cliffs.

Cinn Aird, east of Dingle in Co Kerry (Photo: OpenStreetMap)Cinn Aird, east of Dingle in Co Kerry | OpenStreetMap

The body was subsequently recovered by Valentia RNLI and transferred to University Hospital Kerry in Tralee for post-mortem.

In a statement on social media, the lifeboat crew said: “The thoughts of everyone at Valentia RNLI are with the family at this sad time.”

Published in Coastguard
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Poor weather off the Kerry coast has put on hold the search for Fungie the dolphin who has been missing from his Dingle home for almost a week, according to the Guardian.

Yesterday, Sunday 18 October, RTÉ News reported that divers from Mallow Search and Rescue has joined the search to explore coves around Dingle Harbour amid growing concern for Fungie’s wellbeing.

The bottlenose dolphin has been resident in the village harbour since 1983, rarely straying far from its environs — and never for this length of time.

There was an unconfirmed report of a sighting last Thursday, as local fisherman Gary Hand suggested the marine wildlife favourite was feeding with other dolphins further out in Dingle Bay.

That’s one of the theories being shared by local boatmen — some of whom also suggest that the solitary Fungie may be in hiding from dolphin pods and whales encroaching on his usual inshore waters.

“There’s still hope,” said boatman Gary Brosnan. “If Fungie has died there’s a good chance we’d have found him in one of the inlets or caves. No news is good news.”

Published in Marine Wildlife
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020