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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Disabled Sailing

#Paralympics - The decision to drop sailing from the 2020 Paralympic Games still stands, following a review of the organisers' controversial move by the ISAF Executive.

Sailing joined seven-a-side football on the chopping block when the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) announced its list of 22 sports for the Tokyo Paralympic Games in five years' time.

It means that next year's Paralympic Games in Rio will be the last time sailors take part for the foreseeable future.

The Irish Sailing Association (ISA) expressed its disappointment with the move "at a time when the development of Sailablity Ireland is more active than ever before."

Indeed, Ireland has been at the forefront of disabled sailing, with multiple-time Paralympian John Twomey holding the presidency of the sport's world governing body, and Kinsale hosting the IFDS Paralympic Worlds in 2013.

There were hopes that the ISAF's review of the IPC's announcement would see the decision overturned - especially following the merger of the IFDS with the ISAF late last year.

But those appear to have been quashed with the conformation that the process to select sports for Tokyo 2020 has officially ended.

The ISAF says it "will continue to work hard to reinstate sailing in the 2024 Paralympic Games and also pursue the slimmest possibility of sailing being included at Tokyo 2020."

The ISAF website has more on the story HERE.

Published in Olympic

#disabledsailing – Galway Bay Sailing Club (GBSC), for the first time in it's history, very proudly hosted an "All Ireland" sailing event for sailors with a disability. This national event brought together the largest collection of disabled sailors ever assembled in Galway and in Ireland for a great weekend of competitive sailing.
This was the first time in Irish Sailing history that both juniors and adults with a disability competed together in races over Saturday and Sunday 19th and 20th July.
Due to its stability the Hansa 303 is ideal for disabled sailors. Sailing is one of the very few activities for people with a disability that achieves parity with able bodied peers on the water. The thrill, excitement and freedom experienced by all sailors becomes universal.
The weekend stared off with very light winds. 15 boats registered; 19 sailors with a disability competed. The first signal handed race was run over both days. The winner was Georgina Griffin from Kinsale, second Caolan McCarthy, Kinsale and third Gary Allen from GBSC.
Winners in the other categories were: Shane Barker, Dun Laoighaire; Lia Teahan O Connor, Kinsale and Isobel keane GBSC.
Integration was the real winner – all sections of Galway Bay sailing club got involved – the race experts, sailors from dingy to cruising to juniors got stuck in so that we had every eventuality covered.
Without our sponsors this event could not have been possible:
The week before our event wheelchair users found the boat yard more accessible thanks to very generous sponsorship from Cold Chon Ltd who tarred a large section of the dingy park making it more accessible and wheelchair friendly. Delicious beef burgers and smoked salmon was provided by the Castlemaine Droney Group and KPW did all the design and print. Along with this sponsorship a defining element of the weekend success was the warm welcome, vibrancy and support from the 50 + volunteers!

Our legacy?

Well for starters we all have made a bunch of new friends. We have raised the profile of sailing in general and in particular for those with disability. We have mixed junior and adult sailors and are able to offer sailing to adults now with the new hoist loaned for this occasion. (We are seeking sponsorship to retain this hoist). We've broken through some personal internal and external barriers!

Final word over to the sailors:

Kerry Mussen "Amazing, 1st thing I've found that makes me want to go out the door"

Sean had a wonderful time - to quote him "Best Weekend Ever".

On behalf of Belfast Lough Sailability I would truly like to thank you all for hosting such a great event over the weekend. Our sailors and helpers had a wonderful time and we look forward to welcoming you to Carrickfergus next year.

Anne Taylor
Chairperson
Belfast Lough Sailability

Published in Racing

#gbsc – Galway Bay Sailing Club, for the first time in it's history, is very proudly hosting an "All Ireland" sailing event for sailors with a disability writes Lorraine Scully This national event will bring together the largest collection of disabled sailors ever assembled in Galway for a great weekend of competitive sailing. GBSC  have 17 boats entered from Cork, Dublin, Belfast and Galway with 19 competitors.

The All Ireland HANSA 303 Nationals is in it's third year. 2014 in Galway will be the first time in Irish Sailing history that both juniors and adults with a disability will compete in various races over Saturday and Sunday 19th and 20th July.

Dave Vinnel, GBSC commodore, is very excited to bring these Nationals to Galway – while the club has experience of running many national sailing events this is the first time we will do so for disabled sailors. With the help of our very generous sponsors and a strong band of volunteers we are all really looking forward to welcoming sailors from all over Ireland, North and South.
Due to its stability the Hansa 303 is ideal for disabled sailors. Sailing is one of the very few activities for people with a disability that achieves parity with able bodied peers on the water. The thrill, excitement and freedom experienced by all sailors becomes universal.

For the past number of years GBSC has had growing participation from junior sailors with a disability working closely with Galway Speeders the Galway based multi-sport club for children with a physical disability whose aim is to promote sport for young people with a physical disability. GBSC now has 7 boats for use by sailors with disability and demand still out strips supply!
Just this week wheelchair users will also find the GBSC boat yard more accessible thanks to very generous sponsorship from Cold Chon Ltd who tarred a large section of the dingy park making it more accessible and wheelchair friendly.

Racing will take place from 1-4pm on Saturday and 11.30-2:30 on Sunday and all are welcome to come and visit.

Registration from 9.30 Saturday 19th for competitors

Club house open to all visitors all weekend

For more information phone Bridgette Brew 086 335 9962.

Published in Galway Harbour

#GalwayBay - Galway Bay Sailing Club (GBSC) will host the 2014 National Disabled Sailing Championships, it has been announced.

According to the Galway Advertiser, the decision to give the event to the City of the Tribes was swayed by its successful Access sailing programme for young people with disabilities.

IFDS president John Twomey - also Afloat.ie's Sailor of the Month for August - was in the city recently to see some of those young sailors compete at the helm of Hansa 303 dinghies in GBSC's first Access Autumn Series.

The series features members of the Galway Speeders, a sports club set up for young people with disabilities that's currently seeking funding for equipment that will help its sailors get in and out of their boats more easily.

The Galway Advertiser has more on the story HERE.

Published in Galway Harbour

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020