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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Dun Laoghaire Bicentenary

#PeopleOnPier - Due to popular demand DLR Libraries “People on the Pier” exhibition has been extended giving the public the opportunity to view the free photographic indoor event.

Afloat had reported of the exhibition launched earlier this month which involved an open-air display of peoples photos beamed onto the outside of the Lexicon Library. These publically contributed images formed the current indoor exhibition on display in the iconic building.

In total the collection of 400 candid photos were taken over the years of families and friends enjoying the pier, which were submitted as part of the 2017 commemorations for the bicentenary of Dun Laoghaire Harbour. 

The display in the Lexicon Library's Lab will also serve the purpose of keeping the dlr Libraries’ Local Studies Collection current. The exhibition continues this week but is only to remain running until 5pm this Saturday 16 December.

Today, this Thursday up to 8 pm

Fri / Sat – 9.30 am – 5 pm

For further details of the People on the Pier project and more click the link here.

#LectureOnHarbour - A lecture by esteemed Heritage architect Grainne Shaffrey, is to be held on Thursday, 30th November as part of the Dun Laoghaire Harbour Bicentenary celebrations.

Grainne and her practice have an extensive knowledge of Dun Laoghaire harbour having worked on the East Pier resurfacing and the restoration of the Victoria Monument.

The talks will describe the remarkable physical qualities of the Harbour in the context of its historic development. In addition to exploring some of the very particular ways in which the Harbour continues to be a special place of cultural heritage.

Event Location: Dun Laoghaire, Ferry Terminal Building

Event Time / Date: 19:00 Thursday 30th November 2017  

Event Registration: to book a free place via Eventbrite click the link here. 

The commemorative event is a partnership between the Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company and the Dun Laoghaire Bicentenary committee, for more details visit: www.dlharbour200.ie 

A little bit about Grainne Shaffrey

Gráinne Shaffrey is a principal architect at Shaffrey Architects based on Ormond Quay Lower. Ms Shaffrey is a Royal Institute of Architects Ireland (RIAI) Grade 1 Conservation Architect and currently President of International Council on Monuments and Sites Ireland.

Shaffrey Associates was established in 1967 by Patrick and Maura Shaffrey. The practice has undertaken architectural, urban design and planning projects throughout Ireland and possess a wide knowledge of Irish towns and cities. Architectural work includes the conservation, adaptation and extension of historic buildings and new buildings in existing urban settings.

#SailFlagship –The presence today of the five-masted flagship Wind Surf in Dun Laoghaire never fails to impress despite been the most regular cruiseship caller to the harbour of recent years, writes Jehan Ashmore.

All five masts of Wind Surf are notably of the same height as they stand at a commanding 221 feet (67.5 meters) high. From these masts she sets seven triangular self-furling computer-operated sails. Together the total surface are is 26,881 square feet (or 2,600 square meters).

Even when without sails aloft, Windstar Cruises magnificent motor-sailing yacht makes an impression while occupying Dun Laoghaire’s Carlisle Pier. It is alongside this pier where the 310 guest cruiseship has accommodation based exclusively of staterooms and luxurious suites. Those on board have plenty of open deck space presenting views as likewise the vantage point taken opposite from the harbour’s East Pier.

This season sees six cruiseships in total calling to Dun Laoghaire Harbour which this year celebrates its Bicentenary year. This significant historical event marks the beginning of the harbour’s construction in 1817. This involved using granite hewn from nearby Dalkey.

Originally the purpose of the harbour was as a place of ‘Refuge’. This enabled sailing ships that encountered tempestuous seas in the exposed expanse of Dublin Bay to take shelter within the harbour piers.

Roll on two hundred years and it is refreshing to have Wind Surf, albeit a wind-assisted vessel make for a graceful visitor within the harbour arms. The majestic flagship is easily the largest caller at more than 14,000 gross tonnage, however unlike previous years there are no deeper draft cruiseships. Such considerarably cruiseships have to date taken anchorage calls offshore.

The call of the luxurious 162m Wind Surf so far represents the third call this season and follows the previous visit of fleetmate, Star Pride, a conventional yet yacht-like cruiseship. Beforehand of that call the season was opened by the elegant veteran Serenissima.

In addition to recapping some details about Wind Surf, below are further facts and figures of this more unusual caller to Irish waters.

CAPACITY: 310 Guests
STATEROOMS: 122 deluxe ocean view staterooms / 31 deluxe Suites ocean view suites
BRIDGE DECK SUITES: 2 deluxe ocean view bridge suites
DECKS: 6 decks
CREW: 201 international staff
SHIP'S REGISTRY: Bahamas
LENGTH: 535 feet (162 meters) at waterline; 617 feet (187meters) including bowsprit
DRAFT: 16.5 feet (5 meters)
TONNAGE: 14,745 gross registered tons (grt)
BEAM: 66 feet (20 meters)
ENGINES: 4 diesel electric generating sets, 2 electrical propulsion motor
SPEED: 10 to 12 knots with engines only; up to 15 knots wind and engine assisted

#Bicentenary - Minister for Jobs & Innovation Mary Mitchell O'Connor today became Patron of the Dun Laoghaire Harbour Bicentenary programme.

Convening in the historic Harbour Lodge in Dun Laoghaire, the Minister met members of the Steering Group, which includes the Pavilion Theatre, DLR County Council, the RNLI, the Coal Harbour Users Group, The National Maritime Museum, Dalkey Heritage Centre, a representative of the 4 Yacht Clubs, the Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company and Dun Laoghaire Business Improvement District (BID).

The Bicentenary Steering Group met to discuss a series of initiatives to commemorate and celebrate the 200 year history of this historic harbour.

May 31st 1817 saw the laying of the first stone in the creation of one of the world’s finest man-made harbours, originally named as "The Royal Harbour of King George IV at Kingstown"

Gerry Dunne, CEO of Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company said " this is an incredibly exciting initiative , of national and international significance. We will be engaging with members of the Irish Diaspora all over the world, so that we can gather relevant stories and memorabilia, and create a legacy both online and physical, a legacy which this special place fully deserves"

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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