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Displaying items by tag: Dun Laoghaire Dingle Race

It’s only a week since the listings opened for the National YC’s 2021 Volvo Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race scheduled for June 9th, and already 15 definite entries have arrived in with such speed that the organising committee - under chairman Adam Winkelmann – have said they may have to be prepared to look at an upper limit of 50 boats.

The initial lineup includes defending champion Rockabill VI, Paul O’Higgins’ JPK 10.80 which was also first on her debut on 2017, so the O’Higgins team have set the stakes high in aiming for the “Threepeat” in this classic 280-mile challenge which always provides competitors with a remarkable variety of sailing.

As this list shows, many of the great and the good in Irish offshore racing have led the way in putting themselves into the mix, including the star boat of 2020's two significant race, the Murphy family’s Grand Soleil 40 Nieulargo from Cork, victor in both the Kinsale-Fastnet-Kinsale Race, and the Fastnet 450 from Dublin Bay round the Fastnet and back to Cork Harbour.

And even at this early stage, there’s an international element, as Solent-based Royal Irish YC member Niall Dowling – overall winner of the 2018 Round Ireland with the Ker 43 Baraka GP – has entered with the Ker 40+ Arabella.

See race entries here

Niall Dowling’s Ker 43 Baraka GP at the start of her doubly-successful 2018 Round Ireland Race from Wicklow. Niall Dowling returns, this time  for the D2D 2021, with the newer Ker 40+ ArabellaNiall Dowling’s Ker 43 Baraka GP at the start of her doubly-successful 2018 Round Ireland Race from Wicklow. Niall Dowling returns, this time for the D2D 2021, with the newer Ker 40+ Arabella. Photo: Afloat.ie/David O’Brien

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

Previous race entrants will be offered an early entry option into June's 2021 Volvo Dun Laoghaire-Dingle Race before entry is opened to others boats to allow up to a maximum of 50 for the 280-miler. 

The next edition of the biennial offshore race will start on Wednesday 9th, June 2021, ​a date that has already prompted Afloat's WM Nixon in his first look at the 2021 season, to predict 'it could become symbolic of the emergence from pandemic'. 

The timing of the National YC's biennial offshore race – a week after Howth Yacht Club's Lambay Race on June 4th – is designed so boats participating can use the race to get south in time for O'Leary's Sovereigns Week in Kinsale (June 23 – 26) and then be back well in time in Dun Laoghaire for the Volvo Dun Laoghaire IRC Regatta (July 8 -11).

The National YC's biennial Volvo Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race, currently scheduled for June 9th 2021, could become symbolic of the emergence from pandemic. The start of 2019's race shows overall winner Paul O'Higgin's JPK 10.80 Rockabill VI (left) showing briefly ahead of Mick Cotter's 94ft line honours winner and new course record-setter WindfallThe National YC's biennial Volvo Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race, currently scheduled for June 9th 2021, could become symbolic of the emergence from pandemic. The start of 2019's race shows overall winner Paul O'Higgin's JPK 10.80 Rockabill VI (left) showing briefly ahead of Mick Cotter's 94ft line honours winner and new course record-setter Windfall

The 2021 race is also on the RORC and ISORA race calendars and offers boats in those series to accumulate qualifying offshore racing experience for crews participating in the RORC Fastnet Race in August to its new finish in Cherbourg.

"The 2021 race is on the RORC and ISORA race calendars"

A Notice of Race from the Principal Race Officer Con Murphy is expected shortly and online race entry is expected to open at the end of January in line with the timing of previous editions.

2021 Volvo Dun Laoghaire Dingle Race Chairman Adam Winkelmann - 2021 Volvo Dun Laoghaire Dingle Race Chairman Adam Winkelmann - 'We welcome Volvo Cars again as the title sponsor for the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race and would like to thank them for their continuous support'

The 2021 280-mile race will start, as usual, from the National Yacht Club and the race – now part of the Royal Ocean Racing Club calendar – will be limited to a 50 boat fleet following the success of the 2019 edition that attracted a record 43, including the biggest ever entrant, Windfall that set a new course record.

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

Dun Laoghaire Dingle Race Chairman Adam Winkelmann has named the date for the next edition of the biennial offshore race as Wednesday 9th, June 2021.

The 2021 280-mile race will start, as usual, from the National Yacht Club and Winkelmann says the race – now part of the Royal Ocean Racing Club calendar – will be limited to a 50 boat fleet following the success of this month's edition that attracted a record 43, including the biggest ever entrant, Windfall that set a new course record.

Previous entrants will be offered an early entry option in the race before entry is opened to others to allow up to a maximum of 50.

Adam WinkelmannAdam Winkelmann - has set the date for the 2021 race Photo: Dominick Walsh

More on the Dun Laoghaire Dingle Race here.

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

As the last of the 42-boat fleet arrived into Dingle marina in County Kerry after racing 270-miles from Dun Laoghaire on Dublin Bay photographer Dominick Walsh has captured the atmosphere at one of Europe's most westerly marinas.

The 2019 Volvo Dun Laoghaire to Dingle “D2D” Race started from the National Yacht Club in Dun Laoghaire on Wednesday, June 12th and the first finishers arrived in Dingle Co Kerry on Thursday night with a new course record set by Michael Cotter's Windfall and a successful defence of the overall 'D2D' title by Paul O'Higgins' Rockabill VI.

There'll be a full house for tonight's D2D prizegiving in Dingle!

Read WM Nixon's race review here and all the D2D race news in one handy link here 

Photos below by Dominick Walsh

Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 21 1

Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 41 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 41 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 41 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 41 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 41 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 41 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 41 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 41 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 41 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 41 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 41 1Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race 41 1

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

Day #3 - 8am  We concluded last night’s closing roundup of the continuing drama which is the 270-mile Volvo Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race 2019 by noting that for some crews, the race only seemed to become serious once they’d put the Fastnet astern, and the real challenge was getting along that awe-inspiring Atlantic seaboard to the welcoming haven which is Dingle as efficiently and as tirelessly as possible writes W M Nixon

For by this stage, exhaustion is becoming a significant factor, and it’s a case of the tough old dog for the long road. Boats which had been showing well for much of the race just didn’t seem to have the energy in them any more to keep up the relentless pace, whereas boats with experienced crews who knew the focused bit would come in the final seventy miles seemed to keep something in reserve for the last push, while never letting themselves get out of contention as the race progressed.

Rockabill VI 2188The Rockabill VI crew

Thus having been always there or thereabouts throughout the race, Paul O’Higgins’ and his hardened team on board the defending champion Rockabill VI were fourth to cross the finishing line at 03:19 hrs this morning, and this immediately put them into the IRC lead, with second place IRC going Chris & Patann Power Smith’s J/122 Aurelia which finished at 03.23, while third slot has been grabbed by John O’Gorman’s Sunfast 3600 Hot Cookie, in which visiting rockstar Mark Mansfield has found new sources of formidable speed.

As suggested in our concluding report last night, Conor Doyle’s Xp 50 Freya did indeed get through Andrew Hall’s J125 Freya to take second in line honours, but though they were in at 02:09 and 02:13 repectively, they have slipped to 5h IRC for Jackknife and 11th for Freya, with the upper placings on IRC currently held by the J/109 Ruth (Shanahan family) in fourth, Jakckknife fifth, and another two J/109s, Outrajeous and Mojito, in 6th and 7th.

There are still many boats out racing, but those early placings look increasingly firm.

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

Day #2 10 pm – The Line Honours winner, the 94ft Windfall (Mick Cotter) may be finished with a new course record established, but for many boats you get the impression that the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race is only just becoming serious writes W M Nixon.

Even with the drag race in a reaching northerly for much of the south coast, it was an interesting bit of fleet sailing to monitor. But now that the bulk of the boats are beating to windward from the Fastnet Rock towards the finish, it has become utterly fascinating with a massive fleet compression and former leaders demoted by a place or three.

For some boats, the longer it goes on, the better they seem to get. Conor Doyle’s Xp50 Freya may have had a very disagreeable experience with fishing gear off Ireland’s southeast corner, but since then she’s been into the groove with increasing confidence, and has been turning to windward along the West Cork and Kerry coasts in such a convincing style that she may well pip Andrew Hall’s J/125 Jackknife to take second place on the water.

FREYA X Yacht Conor doyle 1980Full Concentration on Conor Doyle's X Yacht, Freya Photo: Afloat

Two other boats which seem to have found unexpected reserves of extra speed are the Shanahan family on the J/109 Ruth from the NYC, and Rupert Barry’s JOD 35 Red Alert from Greystones, with sailmaker Shane Hughes on the strength.

Red alert D2D Race start 2985Rupert Barry’s JOD 35 Red Alert from Greystones

Admittedly with the unstable wind full of holes, some crews have had the exasperation of sitting almost becalmed while another boat within a mile appears to find a private line of breeze, and seemingly within minutes there she is – gone……

Nevertheless, the showing by Ruth has been extra impressive, She was always there or thereabouts, but Johnny Murphy with Outrajeous seemed to keep the rest of the J/109s under control astern. But from the Old Head of Kinsale westward, Ruth provided an increasing challenge, and at the Fastnet itself she swept past, such that as of 2200 hrs she was ahead of Outrajeous by an entire mile, and top of the leaderboard in IRC as she put Mizen Head astern at 6.5 knots.

"Nevertheless, the showing by Ruth has been extra impressive"

Tonight and tomorrow looks like being another period of lovely soothing rain in best June 2019 style, and Kerry will get its fair share and more, so the winds could go anywhere. But the final result is wide open as first one part of the fleet, and then another, finds a brief period of extra-favourable conditions.

Ruth Shanahan family 2671The 2015 D2D champion, Ruth (Shanahan family) is back at the top of the leaderboard Photo: Afloat

We’ll try to make sense of it in the morning, and then do further analysis in Sailing on Saturday on June 15th.

 Read all the D2D Race News in one handy link here

Tracker & Leaderboard here:

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

Day #2 - 2 pm  Mick Cotter’s 94ft Windfall has to average “only” 11.25 knots over the shortest course from Dun Laoghaire to Dingle if she is to break the 24-hour barrier for this classic 270-mile race writes W M Nixon.

And as she passed the Fastnet Rock at 1000 hrs this morning, while it was scarcely looking its best under grey skies above a grey sea with a decidedly grey-green Cape Clear beyond, at least the big silver-grey boat was making a reasonable speed, and many hours of 13 knots and better during the night and early morning as she reached along the south coast were giving grounds for optimism.

Yet as soon as the Fastnet was astern, the wheels came off with the wind heading then fading and finally dying for a while as she lay virtually motionless off Mizen Head.

"Windfall has 37 miles to sail, and 4 hours and 20 minutes to sail it"

But now the breeze is back from the north, she’s laying the course to the next marker off the Bull Rock, and is showing 10.4 knots while the weather predictions are indicating a freshening – albeit northerly –wind for this afternoon.

This isn’t the headwind it might at first seem, as the course to the finish is a zig-zag with an almost 90-degree turn at Skellig Michael. But nevertheless with 40 miles still to go and 1800 hrs rolling remorselessly down the track, it’s a bit fraying for the nerves, and then some.

The rest of the fleet – with IRC leading boat Jackknife now 46 miles astern of Windfall as she reaches past Castlehaven at a modest 6.4 knots – know only too well that they will have a fresh set of problems to deal with off the southwestern seaboard as the afternoon northerly gives way to northwesterlies and then westerlies tonight, falling light in the morning.

Jackknife 2517IRC leading boat Jackknife Photo: Afloat

So there could well be a lot of racing to do yet, after so many miles of knocking off the distance in a soldier’s wind. Astern of Jackknife, Conor Doyle’s Freya is on the pace – admittedly 15 miles astern – with 9 knots on the clock, but overall on IRC the stability of the leaderboard is maintained with Jackknife still first, Rockabill VI comfortably in second, and Outrajeous working it well in third.

Rockabill D2D Race start 2191Rockabill VI lying second on IRC Photo: Afloat

Outrajeous J109 2840Outrajeous is lying third on IRC

Aurelia J122 2893Aurelia lies fourth on IRC

The inevitable duel between The Prof in Aurelia and Mark Mansfield in Hot Cookie has developed very satisfactorily, with Aurelia very close behind Outrajeous in fourth, and currently 17 minutes ahead of Hot Cookie in 5th, the Sunfast 3600’s highest placing so far as Mono seems to have been finding new reserves of speed for Hot Cookie’s regular crew, and they’re currently making 8 knots well seaward of the Old head of Kinsale.

Hot Cookie 2301Hot Cookie has moved up to fifth on IRC

Meanwhile, the attention inevitably swings back to the head of the fleet and Windfall’s battle with time – 37 miles to sail, and 4 hours and 20 minutes to sail it. It sounds eminently do-able. But don’t forget she’s now off the coast of Kerry, where normal circumstances no longer apply...

Tracker is below:

Read all the D2D Race News in one handy link here

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

Rosslare Harbour RNLI Lifeboat came to the aid of eight people whose 10m yacht got into difficulty off the Wexford coast in the early hours of this morning (Thursday 13 June).

The Rosslare Harbour volunteer crew launched their all-weather lifeboat at 2.45am at the request of the Irish Coast Guard following a report that a 10m yacht which was participating in the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Yacht Race had experienced steering difficulties as it approached Tuskar Rock Lighthouse off the south-east Wexford coast.

As Afloat reported earlier, the yacht, which had eight people onboard used emergency steering to continue on towards Kilmore Quay with the Rosslare Harbour RNLI lifeboat escorting alongside to Carnsore Point. At this point, the yacht was able to continue unaided to Kilmore Quay. The Rosslare Harbour RNLI lifeboat returned to its station at 4.15am this morning.

Speaking following the call out, Eamonn O’Rourke, Rosslare Harbour RNLI Coxswain said: ‘This was an early morning call out for our volunteers but we were all delighted to help and ensure that the sailors were safe and well and could safely reach their destination. We would like to wish the sailors all the best as they continue towards Dingle.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Day #2 - 9am The Volvo Dun Laoghaire Dingle racers have left the murkier weather of the east coast astern, and this morning finds them reaching along the south coast in what could best be described as serviceable northerlies writes W M Nixon. It’s not enough to get Conor Fogerty’s Figaro 3 up on the foils and steaming along, but sufficient to have line honours leader Mick Cotter’s 94ft Windfall 45 miles clear ahead of next-in-line Jackknife (Andrew Hall).

Having taken an offshore curve during the night to avoid lighter winds reported in the Cork Harbour area, Windfall is off Toe Head and closing in towards the Fastnet at 13.6 knots, with 87 miles to the line in Dingle, though with the prospect of winds increasingly on the nose as she closes to the finish. The likelihood of a 24 hour time at 1800 hrs this evening is very much touch-and-go.

Fogerty FigaroConor Fogerty’s Figaro 3 Photo: Rachel Fallon Langdon

Forty-five miles back, Jackknife has led the fleet on a course closer to the coast, and is currently off the entrance to Cork Harbour and on line to pass close to the Old Head of Kinsale. She has built up a 12 mile lead on the next group, which includes Conor Doyle’s Freya (despite lobster pot snags), Chris & Patanne Power Smith’s Aurelia, and Paul O’Higgins’ JPK 1080 Rockabill VI, all of them on speeds around the 9 knot level.

Rockabill Spinnaker 2202Good speed - Paul O’Higgins’ JPK 1080 Rockabill VI Photo: Afloat

In IRC overall, Jackknife has held the lead for most of the night, but occasionally Rockabill VI has slipped into the top slot, but either way the top three have continued to be Jackknife, Rockabill VI and the J/109 Outrajeous (Richard Colwell & Johnny Murphy HYC, skippered by Johnny Murphy).

Fourth place is particularly interesting, as it’s held by Windfall, which benefitted from getting swiftly clear of the messy, gusty and increasingly tide-adverse conditions in the Saltees-Tuskar area in the small hours of the morning, and is now sailing in better conditions than the rest of the fleet, fulfilling expectations that she’d be sailing her own race for much of what is now a processional dash to Dingle.

Mansfield Hot Cookie 2335Four-time Olympian Mark Mansfield (right) is aboard John O’Gorman’s Sunfast 3600 Hot Cookie Photo: Afloat

In fact, even as we write Windfall’s happier circumstances have seen her move into third ahead of Outrajeous, which in turn - now in fourth - leads from Aurelia in fifth with the noted talents of The Prof O’Connell and ISORA’s Peter Ryan on board, while nearby Mark Mansfield aboard John O’Gorman’s Sunfast 3600 Hot Cookie has been sailing a course slightly further offshore, and it’s done them no harm at all – Hot Cookie has moved up to sixth on IRC.

Aurelia J122 2114Talented crew - Aurelia in fifth overall Photo: Afloat

The Mini 6.50 Port of Galway (Dan Mill and Yannick Lemonnier) continues to delight with her performance, with this mighty atom at mid-fleet among much larger craft – she’s currently due south of Mine Head and showing a speed burst of 11 knots.

As for the most senior boat in the fleet, Paul Moxon’s 50ft 1939-built Fred Shepherd-designed yawl Amokura, she has been having a good race for a boat of her vintage, and is currently south of Tramore and making 8.3 knots in the right direction.

Amourka Classic 3075Classic - Paul Moxon’s 50ft 1939-built Fred Shepherd-designed yawl Amokura

Today should be a reward for yesterday’s disagreeable weather and the sometimes frustrating rounding of Ireland’s southeast corner, but for the smaller craft there’s the knowledge that for those still racing through Friday, the unstable wind is likely to continue backing, and though it may eventually go round to the southwest to provide a favourable breeze for the final forty miles to Dingle, it will be a matter of luck whether or not you’re best placed to benefit from it.

Yoyo Sinfast3200 2243

Read all the D2D Race News in one handy link here

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

Day #1 8 pm: With Mick Cotter’s 94ft Windfall the on-the-water leader as she puts Cahore Point astern at 2200hrs, it’s intriguing to note that the unstable but brisk northerly airflow is generous if unpredictable in spreading its favours to different sections of the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle fleet at different times writes W M Nixon

We signed off at 2000 hrs with Andrew Hall’s J/125 Jackknife from Wales holding the corrected time lead. But since then for a while defending champion Rockabill VI (RIYC), Paul O’Higgins’ JPK 1080, was running south on the sluicing ebb with most purpose, and took her turn at the top of the leaderboard.

Windfall WicklowThe view from onboard the on-the-water leader -– Wicklow Lighthouse astern of Windfall by 1955hrs Photo: Windfall Crew

Rockabill D2D Race start 2219Defending champion Rockabill VI (RIYC), Paul O’Higgins’ JPK 1080 Photo: Afloat

But now Jackknife is back in business in a big way with a Corrected Time overall lead of 28 minutes over Rockabill, while third - just ten minutes behind the O’Higgins boat - is a new player in the lead role drama, the J/109 Outrajeous co-owned by ICRA Chairman Richard Colwell and Johnny Murphy, with the latter skippering for the dash to Dingle.

Outrajeous D2D Race start 2833The J109 Outrajeous co-owned by ICRA Chairman Richard Colwell and Johnny Murphy Photo: Afloat

Conor Fogerty’s Figaro 3 Raw seems finally to have found her mojo, and is moving into contention – she may be back at 7th overall on CT, but on the water only Jackknife and Windfall are ahead of her.

While most of the fleet have stayed fairly close to the coast, gallant westerners Dan Mill and Yannick Lemonnier in the Mini 650 Port of Galway have tended to embrace the offshore option, and at the time of writing it’s doing them no harm at all, as they’re logging a cracking 12 -13 knots over the ground and are still ahead of the bulk of the entrants.

Early in the small hours, the favourable ebb will begin to lose its power, and when the adverse flood begins to set in, all will depend on how far your boat has got past the Tuskar Rock, if indeed you’ve managed that at all.

Once you get west of the Coningbeg off the Saltee Islands, the tides are no longer so important. But the tidal gate off southeast Ireland could divide the fleet in a way which will have a lasting effect for the remainder of the race. Get clear of it, and the next turn at the Fastnet Rock beckons, as does the prospect of tomorrow seeing a temporary improvement in the weather.

Track Chart below:

Read all the D2D Race News in one handy link here

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020