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Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Dun Laoghaire

#Superyachts - Afloat.ie has learned that superyacht Christopher is moored in Dun Laoghaire Marina this morning (Monday 13 August) after passage from Belfast.

The 46m Ron Holland-designed cruising ketch previously sailed into Dublin Bay in June 2014, when it was considered Dun Laoghaire’s largest ever visiting yacht.

Since then the marina has hosted various other super-sized vessels — including the 35.8m Arcadia, a yacht sturdy enough to transit the Northwest Passage — which prompted Afloat.ie to ask whether a dedicated superyacht berth could be a realistic proposal for Dun Laoghaire.

Published in Superyachts

#RNLI - Dun Laoghaire RNLI responded to a small powerboat with six onboard on Sunday evening (5 August) when their vessel was caught up on a fishing pot marker just off Dalkey.

The volunteer lifeboat crew was requested to launch their all-weather lifeboat at 10.49pm following a report from the Irish Coast Guard. Weather conditions were fair with a slight breeze, and visibility was good.

Two of the volunteer crew members used the XP-class lifeboat to free the vessel from the pot marker. The lifeboat then lifeboat successfully towed the vessel away from the rocks and escorted it back towards Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

Commenting after the callout, Dun Laoghaire RNLI second coxswain Eamon O’Leary said: “It was dark during the callout and in these situations it is so important to raise the alarm as soon as possible and to ensure that everyone onboard is wearing a lifejacket.”

The incident comes only a month after a small yacht with two on board became entangled on a pot marker outside the harbour, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

BreakingNews.ie reports that three people were rescued by Dun Laoghaire RNLI yesterday morning (Saturday 28 July) after their yacht got into difficulty at sea.

The 47ft yacht had its sail caught on the rudder in poor weather conditions five miles offshore. The crew managed to untangle the obstruction as the lifeboat arrived to bring them to safety.

#RNLI - Yesterday afternoon (Sunday 8 July), Dun Laoghaire RNLI responded to a 31ft yacht with two onboard when their vessel became stranded just off Bray Head.

The volunteer lifeboat crew was requested to launch their all-weather lifeboat at 2.18pm following a report from the coastguard. Weather conditions were near perfect with flat, calm seas.

Once on scene, the lifeboat crew of six checked that the two people onboard the stricken yacht were safe and well before successfully towing the vessel back to Greystones Harbour.

Shortly afterwards, on return to Dun Laoghaire Harbour, the lifeboat stopped to help free a small yacht with two onboard that had become entangled on a pot marker.

Commenting after the callout, Dun Laoghaire RNLI cox Mark McGibney said: “In this incident, the skipper of the 31ft yacht had no choice but to call for assistance, which was the correct thing to do. Both onboard had lifejackets.”

Wearing a lifejacket while on or near the water is part of the advice in the recent joint appeal from the RNLI, Irish Water Safety and the Irish Coast Guard to highlight the risk of drowning during the summer months.

#RNLI - Enniskillen RNLI brought two people to safety on Wednesday afternoon (4 July) after their boat they were on showed signs of catching fire.

The two people on board quickly used their fire extinguishers while also phoning 999 to ask for the coastguard.

Belfast Coastguard quickly requested the launch of Enniskillen’s inshore lifeboat Joseph and Mary Hiley, which launched with the rescue water craft to the casualty vessel close to Castle Cauldwell, three miles east of Belleek in Co Fermanagh.

On arrival, Enniskillen RNLI were joined by a passing vessel offering assistance. Conditions at the time were warm and calm and no wind.

The volunteer crew checked that the casualty boat and the owners had extinguished the source of the fire and carried out necessary precautions.

The lifeboat set up a towline and brought the boat and passengers to Magho jetty, where they were met by Northern Ireland Fire and Rescue Service personnel based in Belleek. The boat was checked over again and all were satisfied that the fire was well extinguished.

Following the callout, Enniskillen RNLI helm Adrian Kelly said: “We were happy to assist the vessel back to Magho jetty after the owner had safely deployed his fire extinguishers and prevented serious damage.

“It was encouraging to see that the vessel had adequate safety equipment on board.”

Elsewhere, Dun Laoghaire RNLI responded to a jetskier when his engine failed in Scotsman’s Bay on Tuesday evening (3 July).

The request to launch came in at 7pm after a member of the public alerted the coastguard.

The lifeboat crew of three on Dun Laoghaire’s in-shore lifeboat successfully towed the jetskier safely back to Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

Commenting after the callout, Dun Laoghaire RNLI helm Alan Keville said: “‘It was great to see the jet skier was wearing a lifejacket but he had no means of alerting the coastguard himself. It is essential to always carry a means of communication.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - Dun Laoghaire RNLI responded to a yacht with one man onboard on Saturday afternoon (30 June) when the skipper’s engine failed just outside Bray Head.

The volunteer lifeboat crew were called into action at 16.24pm following a report from the Irish Coast Guard.

The yacht was on passage from Arklow when engine trouble flared just outside Bray Head.

As the country is experiencing a heatwave, weather conditions were near perfect with clear blue skies and good visibility.

The lifeboat crew quickly arrived on scene and successfully towed the yacht and skipper, who was uninjured, safely back to Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

Commenting after the callout, Dun Laoghaire RNLI coxswain Kieran Colley said: “The skipper of the vessel indeed made a good decision in calling for assistance. He was also wearing a lifejacket, which I’m always glad to see. I can’t stress enough how important it is to wear one.”

Later that same day, Lough Derg RNLI launched to assist a family of five on a 25ft cruiser with engine failure in Youghal Bay, off Garrykennedy on the eastern shore of Lough Derg.

Winds were northerly Force 1/2 and visibility was very good when the lifeboat launched at 6.47pm, arriving on scene just four minutes later.

The lifeboat crew — helm Eleanor Hooker, Dom Sharkey and Joe O’Donoghue — found the two adults and three children on board to be safe and unharmed, and wearing their lifejackets. The skipper of the cruiser had dropped anchor to prevent drift.

The cruiser had engine failure that required specialist attention and so the lifeboat volunteer took the casualty vessel under tow to Garrykennedy Harbour, where it was safely tied alongside at 7.13pm.

#CruiseLiners - A boutique yacht-like cruiseship just shy of 10,000 tonnes docked in Dun Laoghaire Harbour this morning as the first of just three callers this season, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The inaugural caller, Star Pride operated by US based Windstar Cruises with 208 guests had sailed from La Pallice, neighbouring La Rochelle on the French coast lining the Bay of Biscay.

On arrival to the south Dublin Bay harbour in the early hours, the former Seabourn Cruise Line vessel berthed at Carlisle Pier. This is where the considerably larger freight ro-ro Stena Carrier as previously reported had initially called first for survey work before again anchoring offshore. Surprisingly, the ship returned to port to enable crew rest until departing earlier this month. 

Guests of the high-end luxury Star Pride are pampered in facilities among them lounges, a club, casino, screening room, computer room and library. As far as leisure facilities are concerned, there is a spa, two whirlpools, a swimming pool and a fitness centre.  Accommodation comprises of 106 suites, all outside with ocean views.

Star Pride given its small size of 134m long, 19m (beam) wide and 5m draft, has the advantage of calling to destinations involving smaller harbours and secluded coves.

The next caller will be a fleetmate, Star Breeze also a sister which is scheduled but not until September with two calls. As both ships are small, there will be no anchorage callers in Dublin Bay to where considerably larger vessels did so of recent years, though last year the season attracted almost thrice the number of callers with 8 ships and all entering the harbour. Of those only one ship was not operated by Windstar, the expedition cruiseship Serenissima of Noble Caledonia, carrying a mere 85 passengers. 

The third and final Windstar sister that visited Dun Laoghaire last year was Star Legend. The Seattle based operator also has a trio of sail-assisted ships, sisters Wind Star and Wind Spirit with four masts each. In addition the larger and impressive Wind Surf featuring five-masts that during calls to Dun Laoghaire has drawn much admiring attention in recent years. 

The 310 guest capacity Wind Surf has became the most frequent to since the Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company made a concerted effort to attract the sector back in 2011, three years before the Stena HSS fastferry service to Holyhead closed. 

 

 

#Flugtag - The long-awaited return of the Red Bull Flugtag to Dun Laoghaire Harbour is just two days away.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the event this Sunday 20 May will see over 50 teams attempt to push the limits of human flight as they launch their handcrafted flying machines in front of over 40,000 spectators.

The National Yacht Club invites its members to enjoy the spectacle “from your club’s best vantage point” with a barbecue as well as live music and entertainment from 1pm to 5pm.

Members should also be aware that there will be an exclusion zone in the Carlisle Basin with two patrol RIBs from the club to help channel the traffic.

It is also advised not bring your boat alongside the pontoons, as masts or high cabins would impede the view of the show.

The NYC’s launch service is not affected by the Flugtag, but there will be no renting of club boats this weekend.

For further details on the event, including road closures, parking and public transport, see the official Red Bull Flugtag event guide.

#Coastguard - Dun Laoghaire Coast Guard was alerted at 10am yesterday morning (Wednesday 16 May) to respond to a woman and her dog who were cut off by the tide on Merrion Strand, near the seaward side of the Dublin incinerator area.

Dublin Coast Guard’s Marine Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC) activated a procedure with consent to ping the location of the casualty’s phone to give co-ordinates to the responding emergency services.

Dun Laoghaire RNLI and the Dublin-based Irish Coast Guard helicopter Rescue 116 responded to the area and were directed in by the Dun Laoghaire coastguard team.

Rescue 116 proceeded to land on the sand bank while Dun Laoghaire RNLI’s inshore lifeboat stood by to assist. A Dublin Fire Brigade RIB from Dublin Port also responded.

The casualty and her dog were airlifted from the sand bank to awaiting coastguard personal on the beach. After checks by Dublin Fire Brigade paramedics, they were taken back from the beach to land.

Dun Laoghaire Coast Guard noted yesterday’s “very fast” spring tide which caught this dog walker unawares. Tide times for Dublin can be found online HERE.

#RNLI - Dun Laoghaire RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat was called out twice in quick succession this afternoon (Wednesday 9 May) to two separate vessels fouled on fishing pots.

The volunteer crew of Dun Laoghaire launched to assist one boat that had been fouled by pots.

Once safely ashore, the crew’s pagers sounded again with a call to assist a yacht that had also become fouled on pots, and towed it into harbour.

Page 6 of 46

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020