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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Enniskillen

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels and waterways users on the Erne System in Northern Ireland that a section of the navigation channel will be closed between the Killyhevlin Hotel and the Ardhowen for NIE works on the overhead power lines on Tuesday 5 March from 10am to 4pm.

Masters of vessels are advised to adhere to all signage and direction of safety boats, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters and owners of vessels on the Erne System in Northern Ireland that the Erne Eights Head of the River rowing race will take place this Saturday 2 March.

The event will start upstream of the Killyhevlin Hotel and will race through to Enniskillen Royal Boat Club.

Rowing boats and craft will be on the water from 9am to 5pm. There will be around 80 rowing crews participating in the event. The downstream sections of the Round ‘O’ jetty will be closed for the duration.

Masters of vessels should adhere to all instructions given by race marshals on the day and keep the race course clear, especially during racing.

Masters of vessels are also asked to keep wash to minimum when passing rowing crews and race marshals, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels on and users of the Erne System in Northern Ireland that the Henry Street Jetties in Enniskillen will be closed this Friday 23 to Saturday 24 February.

This is to accommodate the annual Fishing Tackle and Bait angling open weekend taking place in the Co Fermanagh town, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels on and users of the Erne System in the Enniskillen area that the power bollards at the Round ‘O’ and Carrybridge will be isolated on Wednesday 8 November for the winter period.

Power will be reconnected at the start of the 2024 boating season, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels and waterway users on the Erne System that the 2023 Hydrobikeathon will take place around the town of Enniskillen on Friday 8 and Saturday 9 September.

The event will involve groups of hydrobikes completing laps of Enniskillen town and Castle Island for a period of 24 hours from 5pm on Friday to 5pm on Saturday.

Masters of vessels and waterway users are advised to proceed with additional caution, to be aware of small non-motorised craft involved in the charity event and to comply with the instructions of safety boats.

To facilitate this charity event, the Castle Museum jetty will be closed from noon on Friday 8 to 6pm on Saturday 9 September, adds the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways.

Published in Inland Waterways

Enniskillen RNLI’s inshore lifeboat John and Jean Lewis was launched at the request of Belfast Coastguard on Wednesday afternoon (9 August) to assess a boat breakdown near Portoa Lock.

The Shetland cruiser with two people onboard had reported encountering mechanical issues, and was found adrift when the lifeboat arrived on scene.

The lifeboat crew assessed those onboard and found them to be safe and well and wearing lifejackets.

After its mechanical issues were remedied, the vessel made its way to the Round ‘O’ jetty followed by the lifeboat crew and it was safely secured at its berth.

Speaking following the call-out, Alan Shaw, volunteer helm at Enniskillen RNLI had advice for all boat users in the summer season.

“Carry out regular maintenance checks on your vessel. Make sure you have the relevant charts required before starting your journey, lifejackets for all on board and a means of calling for assistance if you find yourself in trouble.

“If you see someone in trouble on the water or are in difficulties yourself the number to dial is 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Enniskillen RNLI volunteers launched their inshore lifeboat at 2pm on Monday (3 July), following a request from Belfast Coastguard to check a 17ft fishing boat reported to have all fishing equipment onboard and drifting close to Hare Island.

Winds were westerly, Force 4 at the time and visibility was clear on Lower Lough Erne in Northern Ireland at time of launching.

Arriving on scene, the crew observed the boat with no one onboard. The lifeboat, helmed by Paul Keown and with three crew onboard, subsequently conducted a search of all the islands in the area including the shoreline.

The owner of the boat was meanwhile contacted and found to be safe and well. It transpired that the boat had broken from its moorings.

Speaking following the call-out, Keown said: “While the boat had broken from its moorings, there was an initial concern that someone may be missing as the equipment was onboard.

“We would like to commend the member of the public who raised the alarm when they were concerned, that is always the right thing to do. We would always much rather launch and find that all is safe and well than not launch at all.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Volunteers at Enniskillen RNLI will host a dual celebration at 2 pm next Saturday, 1 July, when the charity’s new state-of-the-art lifeboat station will be officially opened on Killadeas Road.

The charity’s Atlantic 85 class lifeboat, John and Jean Lewis, will also be officially named during a special ceremony. The lifeboat, which has been on service on Lower Lough Erne since 2018, was funded by a legacy from the late John and Jean Lewis from Birmingham.

John Arthur Lewis (1922 – 2013) was a major influence in both model yacht and full-size sailing yacht design with a career spanning 81 years. His interest in model boats began as a boy in Bournville when he used to race model sailing yachts successfully and later began to design and build his own. Success in the model design world eventually drew the attention of the ocean racing fraternity and several full-scale designs were produced. He went on to publish two books of designs. John’s lifelong interest in sailing was shared by his devoted wife, Jean. It was, therefore very much their joint decision that the RNLI receive a legacy to finance a lifeboat. While the extended family are unable to attend the ceremony next week, they are delighted that this wish has come to fruition in the purchase and active service of a lifeboat on Lough Erne.

The lifeboat, which has been on service on Lower Lough Erne since 2018, was funded by a legacy from the late John and Jean Lewis from Birmingham.The lifeboat, which has been on service on Lower Lough Erne since 2018, was funded by a legacy from the late John and Jean Lewis from Birmingham

Despite being on service for the last four and a half years, where the John and Jean Lewis has launched 97 times and brought 205 people to safety, the naming ceremony has been consciously held off to coincide with the completion and official opening of a new station, now home to the lifeboat and her volunteer crew.

After being housed in temporary accommodation for 21 years, volunteers at Enniskillen RNLI were handed the keys to their new state-of-the-art building on the Killadeas Road at Gublusk in November last year.

The modern purpose-built lifeboat station is located close to the lough to allow for an efficient inshore lifeboat launch. The station also houses the associated launching tractor and equipment, full crew changing facilities, a workshop, office and training room.

The Omagh-based company Woodvale Construction carried out the build, which took little over a year to complete.

A generous contribution towards the cost of the build was made by Ann Johnson, family of the late Alfred Russell Wallace Weir from Bangor in County Down, in his memory.

The building is designed with a heating system which allows the heat to be drawn from the ground and produced inside, keeping the temperature at an ambient 16 degrees Celsius. The excess is used to heat the water for showering, washing, and cleaning the vessels. The building is also fitted with solar panels on the roof to generate electricity.

In 2001, Lough Erne became home to the RNLI’s first inland lifeboat station. However, due to the overall size and complexity of the lough and its high leisure usage, the decision was taken by the RNLI in 2002 to base a second lifeboat on the upper lough at Carrybridge that would work in conjunction with the original lifeboat station on the lower lough at Killadeas. Today, Lough Erne is home to two separate lifeboat stations, Enniskillen and Carrybridge RNLI.

Speaking ahead of next week’s special event, Gary Jones, Enniskillen RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager, said: ‘This day has been a long time coming, and I am delighted for the whole volunteer team that we can officially open this wonderful new station, home to our equally wonderful lifeboat. The new station is a testament of the RNLI’s commitment and dedication to the community here locally and a credit to our crew’s efforts in continuing to bring people to safety on Lower Lough Erne.

‘We are now well settled in our new station but can still be overwhelmed with the structure and facilities we now have when we come together for call-outs and training; it really has made such a difference. We would like to thank everyone who has helped us to get to this stage, including the Weir family from Bangor in County Down and the Lewis family from Birmingham. We will look forward to showcasing our new station and officially naming our lifeboat next week when we can share the occasion with our families, friends, and invited guests.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Tagged under

Waterways Ireland advises all masters and users of the Erne System in Northern Ireland that the channel east of Castle Island in Enniskillen will be closed from this Wednesday 7 June to 30 September 2023.

This is for the creation of a water activity zone in the area, similar to that created last year. The designated area will be clearly marked by floating buoys.

Access to Castle Museum Jetty will be maintained when approaching from the north of Castle Island.

Mariners should use the navigation channel to the west of Castle Island and proceed at slow speed with minimum wash, adhering to any instructions or displayed signage.

Mariners should also be aware of small non-motorised craft also operating in the navigation, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels and waterway users on the Erne System in Northern Ireland that the Castle Museum and Henry Street jetties in Enniskillen will be closed to mooring over the coming days to facilitate the Erne Classic coarse angling competition.

The Henry Street Jetty will close from 8am on Saturday 6 May while the Castle Museum Jetty will close from 8am on Tuesday 9 May. Both will reopen from 6pm on Friday 12 May.

Masters of vessels and waterways users are requested to proceed with additional caution in the vicinity of the fishing competition and to be aware of possibility of fishing lines in the water, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

Published in Inland Waterways
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020