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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Erne System

Waterways Ireland advises that Portora Lock on the Erne System near Enniskillen will be closed to boat traffic on Tuesday 19 and Wednesday 20 January to accommodate essential maintenance works to the lock gates.

Masters of vessels on this inland waterway are asked to heed all instructions from safety personnel who will be in the area.

Published in Inland Waterways

A series of consultative workshops on the feasibility of an iconic Pilgrim Way between the Shannon Navigation and Erne System took place earlier this month.

In late 2018, West Limerick Resources in partnership with Waterways Ireland and 13 local development companies (LDCs) and associated local authorities commissioned SLR Consulting and Alan Hill Tourism Development to investigate the feasibility of developing a 350km cross-border Pilgrim Way along the inland waterways.

The area under consideration is a 20km-wide corridor which uncovers a unique and vast pilgrim heritage on and along the inland waterways, from the Shannon estuary in Co Kerry northwards through the Shannon Navigation, Shannon-Erne Waterway, and Erne System in Co Fermanagh to Co Donegal.

The aim is to develop an iconic international ‘Pilgrim Way’ based on the rich early Christian and Viking heritage of the Early Medieval period in Ireland.

Well known ecclesiastical sites include Scattery Island, Iniscealtra (Holy Island, Clare), Clonmacnoise (Offaly), Quaker Island (Lough Ree), Boyle Abbey (Roscommon), Devenish Island (Lough Erne) and the iconic pilgrimage site at Lough Derg (St Patrick’s) in Donegal, among others.

Many more, lesser known sites are included in the overall analysis for a total of more than 100 sites in total. Waterways Ireland has more information about the project.

Published in Inland Waterways

#InlandWaters - Waterways Ireland advises that the electricity supply to power pedestals and the supply of water to taps on public moorings on the Shannon Navigation will soon be disconnected for the winter period.

The move is being made for environmental reasons and to reduce maintenance costs. Services will be restored prior to the commencement of the 2019 boating season.

Shore power supply at the Round ‘O’ and Carrybridge public moorings on the Erne System, as well was water supply to taps throughout that system, was already disconnected or winter as of Wednesday 7 November.

Published in Inland Waterways

MARINE NOTICE

No. 76 of 2013

ERNE NAVIGATION

UPPER LOUGH ERNE

TEMPORARY CLOSURE OF PUBLIC JETTY

Derryvore

Trial Bay

Waterways Ireland wishes to advise masters and owners that the mooring jetty at the above location has been temporarily closed to the public to facilitate emergency repair works.

Waterways Ireland apologises for any inconvenience caused during these works.

Charles Lawn
Inspector of Navigation
25 Jun 2013
Tel: 00 353 (0)90 6494232
Fax : 00 353 (0) 6494147

Published in Inland Waterways
Tagged under

MARINE NOTICE

No. 56 of 2013

Erne System Jetty & Slipway

Closures for G8 2013

13th-19th June

Marine Notice No 27 of 2013 refers

Waterways Ireland wishes to advise all users of the Erne System of the following:

The Waterways Ireland public slipways at Camagh Bay and Rossclare will be closed from Thursday 13th June to Wednesday 19th June.

14th-19th June

Waterways Ireland Headquarters jetty will be closed

from Friday 14th June to Wednesday 19th June.

16th-19th June

The Waterways Ireland public jetties located within the area covered by the PSNI G8 Marine Plan will be closed for the duration of the Marine Plan i.e. mid-day Sunday 16th June to midnight Tuesday 18th June:

• Camagh Bay

• Carrickreagh

• Devenish East

• Devenish West

• Hay Island

• Lough Erne Resort

• Rossclare

• Trory

In addition the Killyhevlin Hotel jetty will be closed from Sunday 16th June to Tuesday 18th June.

Further Information on Navigation on the Erne System visit www.waterwaysireland.org or contact the Lough Erne Warden on +44 (0)28 6632 2836.

For more information on the G8 Summit and the PSNI G8 Marine Plan visit www.g8ni2013.com/faqs and www.facebook.com/PSNI.G8

Charles Lawn

Lt Cdr (rtd)

Inspector of Navigation

12 Jun 2013

Tel: 00 353 (0)90 6494232

Fax :00 353 (0)90 6494147

 


Published in Inland Waterways
Tagged under

#InlandWaterways - Waterways Ireland has advised all masters and users of the Erne system that the channel east of Castle Island near Enniskillen will be closed till Tuesday 11 June to facilitate a number of events on the water.

Mariners are directed to follow the marked navigation channel and signs to the west of Castle Island and proceed at a slow speed and with minimum wash. They should note any advise or instructions given by event organisers when in this section of the navigation.

Public jetties in the vicinity will remain accessible throughout, though some minor restrictions may be in place as and when required. Further information is available from the Lough Erne warden at 028 6632 3004.

Elsewhere, there will also be restricted mooring for masters and owners on the River Shannon at Carrick-on-Shannon to facilitate spectator viewing of the Carrick 400 event.

On Sunday 2 June the quay wall from the downstream face of the town bridge to the floating moorings will be out of bounds for mooring from 7pm till midnight.

In other waterways news, recent water quality testing has shown the harbour at Kilcock on the Royal Canal to now be within normal bathing water standards.

Published in Inland Waterways
Waterways Ireland has released revised navigation guides to the inland waterways; the Shannon Erne Waterway and the Erne System as well as two free guides; the What's On Guide 2011 and Publications Catalogue.

The Shannon-Erne Waterways Charts have been updated to take account of the upgrade works that have taken place in recent years along the navigation. The revision of the navigation guides for Lough Erne have been facilitated by the survey work undertaken recently on the lakes by Waterways Ireland in joint partnership with OSNI. Staff from Operations and the Inspectorate have also been closely involved in the revisions. The price of the new guides remains unchanged.

waterwayspublications

The new inland waterways publications

The Whats On 2011 is a free guide to all the events taking place along the waterway corridors in 2011. The Publications Catalogue (free) highlights the publications Waterways Ireland has for sale and for free with Navigation, History and Activity sections covering a wide range of interests. A photographic book for Lough Erne has just been published and is also for sale through Waterways Ireland.
All the publications are available from the Waterways Ireland webshop www.shopwaterwaysireland.org or from retailers, hospitality outlets and Tourist Information Centres along the navigations.

Published in Inland Waterways

Erne System, Lower Lough Erne, Kesh Marina Jetty

Waterways Ireland wishes to advise masters of inland waterways vessels that approximately 15m of this jetty in now available for use while the remainder is closed for repair. Access from the jetty to the car park is also available.

A further marine notice will issue when repairs have been completed.

Any inconvenience that this may cause our customers is regretted.

Charles Lawn
Lt Cdr (rtd)
Inspector of Navigation
12 Jan 2011
Tel: 00 353 (0) 90 6494232

Published in Inland Waterways
Erne system users on the inland waterways have been advised by Waterways Ireland that the channel east of Castle Island on Lough Erne will be closed from Monday 21st to June 30th. The full notice is attached.
Published in Inland Waterways

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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