Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Faroe Islands

#Fishing - Mackerel quotas will be the focus of discussions among European fisheries ministers in Brussels today as Ireland seeks a reduction of Iceland's share.

As RTÉ News reports, Marine Minister Simon Coveney will seek "strong and decisive action" against Iceland and the Faroe Islands unless the European Commission reports progress in talks over the realignment of mackerel catch limits.

Iceland's quota for mackerel increased from 2,000 tonnes in 2009 to a whopping 146,000 tonnes just two years later as stocks of the staple fish soared - partly due to migration from more southerly European waters.

But Minister Coveney has blasted Iceland's move as "irresponsible and unacceptable fishing".

The talks come in the wake of fruitful reform of the Common Fisheries Policy led by the minister as president of the EU Fisheries Council during Ireland's EU Presidency in the first half of this year.

Published in Fishing

Passengers embarking in Dublin Port for a cruise next month will firstly spend their first night onboard while docked in the capital, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The classic cruiseship Saga Ruby will welcome her passengers and after checking in they can explore the 4-star rated vessel followed by dinner, marking the first evening of an eight-night cruise of the Faroe, Orkney & Outer Hebridean Islands.

On the following day passengers can remain onboard and enjoy the facilities or take an optional tour of Dublin or Wicklow prior to returning to the cruiseship for the evening departure on 24 July.

Prices start from €1,159pp in a twin inside cabin, for more information on other cabin categories and the cruise from John Galligan Travel click here.

Saga Ruby is one of the last traditionally built cruiseships, featuring spacious wooden decks in particularly on the tiered decks overlooking her cruiser stern. The 24,492 tonnes vessel joined Saga Cruises in 2005 after a $17m refit and was at one stage was the Caronia of Cunard Line, but she started her career as Vistafjord for Norwegian America Line as a combined cruise-liner /cruise-ship when built in 1973. To read more about the classic ship click here.

She can take over 600 passengers and is currently operated by the Saga Cruises which caters primarily for the UK over-50's market noting passengers can be accompanied by adults over 40.

Published in Cruise Liners
The crew of sailors, artists, musicians and historians on board Ar Seachrán - who are retracing the famous voyage of St Brendan - were refused permission to land on Skellig Michael, it has emerged.
The Kerryman reports that though some visitors are understood to have landed on the island in recent weeks, the OPW refused the Brendan's Voyage crew on health and safety grounds.
A spokesperson for the OPW said it requires at least 10 days notice to make preparations for any visitors and repair damage to pathways and buildings occurring over the winter months.
Dr Breandán Ó Ciobhán of the voyage party described the news as "very disappointing".
Ar Seachrán, a 45ft yacht owned by Paddy Barry - himself a veteran of unique ocean voyages - will continue on its journey up the west coast of Ireland and Scotland, by the Orkneys, Shetlands and Faroe Islands to Iceland.

The crew of sailors, artists, musicians and historians on board Ar Seachrán - who are retracing the famous voyage of St Brendan - were refused permission to land on Skellig Michael, it has emerged.

The Kerryman reports that though some visitors are understood to have landed on the island in recent weeks, the OPW refused the Brendan's Voyage crew on health and safety grounds.

bon_voyage_a_danny

Photo copyright: Robert Brummett


A spokesperson for the OPW said it requires at least 10 days notice to make preparations for any visitors and repair damage to pathways and buildings occurring over the winter months.

Dr Breandán Ó Ciobhán of the voyage party described the news as "very disappointing".

Ar Seachrán, a 45ft yacht owned by Paddy Barry - himself a veteran of unique ocean voyages - will continue on its journey up the west coast of Ireland and Scotland, by the Orkneys, Shetlands and Faroe Islands to Iceland.

Published in Coastal Notes
At today's Council of Agriculture and Fisheries Ministers Meeting in Brussels, Sean Connick TD, Minister of State at the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, welcomed the opportunity to prepare for negotiations on the current international impasse with Iceland and the Faroe Islands with regard to the management of the mackerel fishery in the North East Atlantic.

Minister Connick said "I want to see a fair deal to resolve this issue and secure the future for our fishermen and fish factories. However, I made it clear that I will not accept a deal at any price."

Currently Iceland and the Faroe Islands are acting unilaterally and outside of normal fishery management protocols and their actions pose a serious threat to the well being of the mackerel stock which economically, is Ireland's most important stock. The item was placed on today's agenda in advance of the intensive negotiations on mackerel management due to commence in October and as a follow up to the June Council where Ireland lead the debate.

Minister Connick reiterated his dismay at the continuing irresponsible fishing by Iceland and the Faroes on the mackerel stock, and his desire to see a resolution to the situation. So far in 2010, Iceland has caught about 115,000 tonnes which is more than 25 times their catch four years ago. In the case of the Faroes, their 85,000 tonnes is more than 3 times their catch in 2006. Ireland's quota in 2010 is 62,000 tonnes.

The Minister said "Ireland has consistently supported the need to reach an international agreement on mackerel management. However we can only accept an agreement that is fair and proportionate. We consider that the current fishing levels by Iceland and the Faroes are totally unjustified and that any eventual agreement must involve much reduced levels of fishing by these countries. We must robustly put our case and minimise the final cost to our fishermen."

The long term stability of the lucrative mackerel stock is of paramount importance to Ireland and in urging for increased intensification of efforts to reach a solution the Minister advised the Council that "It is my opinion that a joint approach with Norway, considering our long term agreement with them, would have added weight and would be more likely to succeed".

Minister Connick said, "I was heartened by the widespread support of my EU colleagues for the concerns that I first raised on this issue at the June Council".

There will be intensive negotiations over the autumn and the Minister committed that Ireland would work closely with other Member States and the Commission to consider all options to make progress and find a basis for a long term agreement. The Minister emphasised the critical importance of securing fair and equitable arrangements at international level that will deliver a sustainable mackerel fishery for the Irish fleet and ensure the continued prosperity of the seafood processing sector in coastal communities.

Published in Fishing

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020