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Displaying items by tag: Fisheries Local Action Group

A third tranche of grant awards worth €558,039 to 33 local community groups and micro-enterprises were made today by the Minister for Agriculture Food and the Marine, Charlie McConalogue T.D. See the full breakdown of awards below.

In the South, Ring Rowing Club got an 80% grant of €5,200 for equipment. Likewise, Courtmacsherry Rowing Club was awarded €7,988

Baltimore Community Council’s Croí Na Mara project got €14,940 towards its memorial to commemorate those lost to the sea in the coastal village in West Cork

In the North, Donegal County Council were awarded €15,840 for Harbour facilities.

The awards by five of the Fisheries Local Action Groups were established under Ireland’s European Maritime and Fisheries Fund Programme. The grants are co-funded by the Government of Ireland and the European Union.

Announcing the third tranche of awards, Minister McConalogue said, “I am delighted to announce today a further 33 coastal projects to benefit from EMFF funding through the Fisheries Local Action Groups established as part of my Department’s EMFF Programme supporting the development of our seafood sector and coastal communities. These latest grant awards mean a total of €3.3 million FLAG funding has been awarded this year alone to 188 coastal projects.”

Minister McConalogue added, “These projects will provide valuable economic and social benefits to our coastal communities during a difficult period for many. This is just one of the ways in which my Department’s EMFF Programme is making a positive difference to our coastal communities.”

Flag South

Applicant

Project Title

Rate

Total Cost

Grant Aid

Ring Rowing Club

Equipment

80%

6,500.00

5,200.00

Courtmacsherry Rowing Club CLG

Equipment

80%

9,985.00

7,988.00

Oceans of Discovery

Oceans of Discovery Scuba Diving & Marine Education / Promoting Corks Underwater World

50%

20,063.00

10,031.50

Wild Atlantic Glamping Ltd.

Equipment

50%

11,252.00

5,626.00

Clean Coasts Ballynamona

Equipment

80%

31,666.80

25,333.44

Bantry Inshore Search & Rescue Association CLG

Equipment

80%

22,448.00

17,958.40

Gecko Adventures

Watersports Equipment

50%

30,016.00

15,008.00

Ballycotton Development Company Limited

Village Island Mural

80%

1,142.00

913.60

Elln Hutchins 

Seaweed Educational Supports

80%

9,902.00

7,921.60

Baltimore Community Council

Croí Na Mara

60%

24,900.00

14,940.00

         
 

Total

 

167,874.80

110,920.54

       

 


Flag North

Applicant

Project Title

Rate

Total Cost

Grant Aid

Donegal County Council

Harbour Facilities

60%

26,400.00

15,840.00

Coiste Forbartha na Carraige

Footbridge

80%

32,627.12

26,101.70

On the Rocks

Pods

40%

69,800.00

27,920.00

Muileann Coirce Leitir CTR

Siúlóid Abhainn na Timpeallachta (Environmental River Walk)

80%

43,803.32

35,042.66

         
 

Total

 

172,630.44

104,904.35


FLAG Northwest

Applicant

Project Title

Rate

Total Cost

Grant Aid

Mayo North Destination Steering Group

Support for Mayo North Tourism promotion and development plan 2020 – 2023

80%

22,623.27

18,098.62

Jasmin Priegelmeir

Cré Clare Island Pottery Shop

40%

14,698.05

5,879.22

Mayo County Council/Belmullet Tidy Towns

Mayo County Council/Belmullet Tidy Towns

33%

150,000.00

50,000.00

Ceide Coast Community

Feasibility study for Ceide Coast Incubation Hub

80%

20,000.00

16,000.00

         
 

Total

 

207,321.32

89,977.84


FLAG West

Applicant

Project Title

Rate

Total Cost

Grant Aid

J & S Ocean Products

Upgrading Processing Equipment

80%

16,549.00

13,239.20

Séamus Ó Flatharta

Inis Oírr Glamping and Campsite

40%

17,460.00

6,984.00

Oranmore Castle

Oranmore Castle Cultural Centre

40%

42,553.21

17,021.28

Calluragh House Concerts

Workshop Improvements

40%

7,801.00

3,120.40

Loop Head Tourism Ltd

Development of the tourism product on Loop Head peninsula which will have a positive effect on the local communities

80%

4,900.00

3,920.00

Cuan Beo CLG

Cuan Beo - Implementing a holistic approach to sustainability in Galway Bay 2020

80%

16,191.55

12,953.24

Spiddal Craft & Design Centre

Online marketing campaign

80%

6,500.00

5,200.00

Owen O Connell

Training

50%

2,000.00

1,000.00

Údarás na Gaeltachta

Slí Chonamara Trail

100%

43,070.58

43,070.58

         
 

Total

 

157,025.34

106,508.70

         
 

Overall Total

 

887,011.50

558,039.12

 

Published in Coastal Notes

Fisheries Local Action Groups (FLAGs) from across Europe will be meeting in Bantry next month to discuss “smart” ways to tackle coastal challenges.

The Smart Coastal Areas seminar, hosted by FLAG South and Bord Iascaigh Mhara at the Westlodge Hotel from Tuesday 2 to Thursday 4 April, aims to provide ideas and guidance on ‘smart’ development — including activities, development models and ways of working to boost the fisheries industry and coastal regions in an innovative way.

In 2017, the GDP of the Irish seafood sector was estimated at €1.15 billion. More than 14,000 people are employed in Ireland’s seafood sector, many of whom work and live in rural coastal communities.

Fisheries and coastal areas are impacted by factors such as depopulation, ageing population, climate change and economic decline.

The EU’s European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) was set up to support initiatives by local fisheries communities through Community-Led Local Development (CLLD). FLAGs can use this money to implement projects that support sustainable small-scale fisheries and aquaculture production, and coastal communities.

However, funding is not the only answer, as creativity and strategic action is also needed.

The Smart Coastal Areas seminar will highlight:

  • Smart partnerships (creating win-win situations between different interest groups)
  • Smart resource use (optimising local resources and production systems)
  • Smart financing (reaching small-scale beneficiaries: micro-credit, etc)
  • Smart services (adapting services to ensure their viability: smart harbours, connecting remote areas, etc)

The seminar will include presentations on FLAG projects in EU countries that demonstrate smart approaches to rural sustainability and development. Local examples from the Cork coast are Courtmacsherry Community Shop and Schull Bait Bins, both supported by Ireland’s FLAG South.

Also included with the seminar will be a field visit to local fisheries-related businesses as well as Whiddy Island to view the progress of a tourism-related project.

Published in Fishing

#Fishing - Marine Minister Michael Creed has announced details of grants worth €1.5 million under Ireland’s European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) to more than 100 coastal-based projects.

The grants support a total investment of €2.4 million in these additional 106 projects within Ireland’s seven Fisheries Local Action Groups (FLAGs).

“The FLAGs initiative is proving a fantastic success and the grants awarded to the 247 local coastal projects to date in 2018 will be a hugely important boost to these coastal communities,” Minister Creed said.

Successful projects included investments in micro seafood enterprises, marine tourism and marine leisure projects, heritage projects, small harbour facilities, and environmental and training projects.

The grants are co-funded by the Government and the European Union under the EMFF Operational Programme for the seafood sector.

Details on the FLAG scheme and on how to apply can be found on the Bord Iascaigh Mhara website.

Published in Fishing

#Fishing - Marine Minister visited Ballycotton Harbour in Co Cork yesterday (Thursday 8 June) to announce a range of successful projects that will deliver a total investment of €3.6 million covering 153 projects under the Fisheries Local Area Action Group (FLAG) Strategy for Ireland’s seven coastal regions.

The FLAG Scheme is co-funded by the Exchequer and the EU under Ireland’s European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) Operational Programme 2014-20. Over the duration of the EMFF programme, the FLAG Scheme will deliver €12 million in funding to Ireland’s coastal communities.

Speaking in Ballycotton at the event to announce the FLAG grant offers, Minister Creed said: “It is testament to the hard work and dedication of our volunteer FLAG Board members in each of our seven FLAG regions that this year’s programme has delivered so many projects that will enhance the economic and social wellbeing of our coastal communities.”

Over 200 project applications were received under the FLAG Scheme this year, with the final 153 selected by the FLAG Boards for their contribution to community rejuvenation, enterprise, innovation, job creation and skills enhancement across the fishing, aquaculture and maritime industries.

Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM) worked closely with the FLAG Boards around the coast as they developed and implemented their own local strategies, added its chief executive Jim O’Toole.

“Seafood and its wider role in the community is at the core of this innovative programme and it is the diverse nature of the projects funded under the scheme that illustrates the true value of the seafood industry to our coastal communities and also the potential for further growth in the years ahead,” he said

Finian O’Sullivan, board chair of FLAG South, shared his delight that the Cork region “has approved funding for 17 projects ranging from marine tourism, seafood development and production, community-led initiatives, and supports for small-scale coastal fishermen.

“Of the 17 projects approved today, €250,000 in grant aid has been awarded with an overall value to the economy of the South FLAG area of over €500,000.”

Last month, Minister Creed announced the award of more than €1.3 million in grants to 19 seafood enterprises in nine different counties under the EMFF Operational Programme of the seafood sector.

Published in Fishing

#FISHING - Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM) recently convened a Fisheries Local Action Group (FLAG) with representatuves from the fishing and tourism industries, community groups and county councils to discuss ways to boost revenue in the Galway and Clare region.

As the Galway Advertiser reports, the Western region FLAG comes after the official launch of the 'Axis 4' programme for sustainable development of fishery-dependent areas, which aims to empower communities that rely on fishing or aquaculture to further develop the marine resources at their disposal.

It also comes hot on the heels of the Government's 'ocean wealth roadmap' launched by Marine Minister Simon Coveney earlier this month, which is specifically geared towards exploiting Ireland's potential for 'blue growth'.

The six FLAGs established in key coastal areas around Ireland are responsible for formulating a development strategy for funding suitable local projects. To qualify for funding support, such projects must satisfy a list of critera, such as having a clear marine connection or providing specific benefit to a fishing area.

The Galway Advertiser has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Fishing

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020