Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Granuaile

Following a recent re-enactment to retrace Granuaile, the Irish Pirate Queen's voyage from the west of Ireland to London where she met the Virgin Queen in 1593, the Irish will again be present in the UK capital as part of a major maritime event next week, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The event is the London International Shipping Week (9-13th Sept.) though only first held in 2017, LISW returns to the Thames and is regarded as one of the largest maritime events in the world. During the week, major announcements will be made by industry and government on the future of the UK’s £40bn maritime sector.

Aptly a present day Royal link is connected also with maritime matters as Princess Anne is to launch LISW19 along with senior British Cabinet ministers including Minister for Maritime, Nusrat Ghani MP, when they officially welcome 500 of the world’s leading maritime executives, diplomats and heads of government. 

Among the packed-filled event programme of seminars, conferences and receptions is the LISW19 International Maritime Cluster Round Table Debate which is to be sponsored by the Irish Maritime Development Office. The IMDO is an Irish government office which provides support to national and international maritime businesses in Ireland in addition the agency works to provide independent advice and guidance on EU funding initiatives.

The LISW debate will involve maritime clusters represented from those in the UK, Singapore, Monaco, Hong Kong, US, Ireland, Norway, Greece, Cyprus and Malta. Leaders of these maritime clusters from around the world will discuss and debate key issues facing the way clusters operate independently. In addition the debate will provide an opportunity as to how they can improve cooperation between themselves.

Following the debate and discussion session will be lunch held on Wednesday (11th Sept.) at the offices of Norton Rose Fulbright, 3 More London Riverside. The morning invitation only held event has a target audience representing shipowners, managers, brokers, insurance related businesses, ports, regulators and financial services. For further information about LISW19, this can be found on the event's dedicated website here and event guide. 

The venue of London Riverside as the name suggests is within sight of Tower Bridge, Pool of London where the re-encactment of Granuaile (Grace O'Malley) voyage (as alluded above) took place at the historic setting of the Pool of London. Afloat will have more from this tourist attraction during the course of the event week.  

Completion of the re-enactment trip to the UK capital involved ocean-race boat, Believe in Grace which was solo sailed by Joan Mulloy from County Mayo, whose ancestor was Grace of Malley also known as the Pirate Queen of Mayo.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#FORMER IRISH LIGHTS TENDER -With the Guardian 8 preparing to set sail from her builders homeport of Arklow this month, as previously reported on Afloat.ie, her owners Gardline Marine Services also operate a former Commissioners of Irish Lights tender, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The Great Yarmouth based company operate a multi-purpose fleet which includes the survey vessel Ocean Seeker (PHOTO). She was a familiar sight as the ILV Granuaile (1970/1,943grt) while serving for three decades from the Irish Lights marine depot in Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

Built by Fergusan Brothers of Port Glasgow, she was the last traditional tender for CIL in that her working deck was positioned forward. Apart from the short career of the Gray Seal, the 2000 built successor ILV Granuaile (the third to carry the name of the Mayo pirate queen) was the first custom built tender for CIL to introduce a radical design with an aft end work deck.

Published in Lighthouses

It would not have been a problem if the 80-metre Irish Lights Vessel Granuaile moored in Scotsman's Bay was the only obstacle for the Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC) fleet to overcome tonight. It was obvious though – as soon as the first guns sounded – there were bigger issues for course setters as the evening's timid easterly breeze started to die.

As the flags drooped on DBSC's Spirit of the Irish committee boat shorter courses were set for the 17 classes – and 200 or more competing boats – but to no avail, the fickle light wind was not going to hold out.

As the Dragon and SB3 classes started their race it was apparent that even the fetch from the back of the East pier to East mark was going to be a big ask with such adverse tide.

After all but one of the white sail fleet failed to cross the start line the Race officer was forced to rule them out of time.

Even though it looked like there was breeze out beyond the Burford bank there was nothing in the inner bay area;  crews sat to leeward, spinnakers collapsed and the first race of the 128th DBSC sailing season was abandoned.

 

Published in DBSC

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020