Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Howth

HOWTH YACHT CLUB. BRASS MONKEYS SPRING (RACE) 20/02/2011 Class 2 HPH: 1, Maximus P Kyne; 2, Papillon B O'Halloran; 3, Rum Doodle D Byrne; Class 3 HPH: 1, Just Good Friends M Carroll; 2, Invader G Glynn; 3, Scullduggery G Forde; Class 1 Non Spinny HPH: 1, Arcturus P & D McCabe; 2, Out & About T McCoy; 3, Walter Mitty S & D Mullaney; Class 3 Non Spinny HPH: 1, Stromcrow D Cronin; 2, Hippocampus B O'Loughlin; 3, Suaimhneas Grant/McDonaldB. LASER FROSTBITE SPRING (O'ALL) 20/02/2011 LASER STANDARD: 1, Daragh Kelleher SSC (23.00); 2, Daragh Sheridan HYC (25.00); 3, Evan Dolan NYC (27.00); LASER STANDARD APPRENTICE: 1, Darach Dineen HYC (13.00); 2, Conor Murphy HYC (15.00); 3, Brendan Costello MYC (25.00); LASER STANDARD MASTER: 1, Daragh Kelleher SSC (18.00); 2, Evan Dolan NYC (20.00); 3, Conor Greagsbey NYC (31.00); LASER STANDARD GRAND MASTER: 1, Daragh Sheridan HYC (9.00); 2, Stephen Quinn HYC (19.00); 3, Robin Hegarty HYC (30.00); LASER RADIAL: 1, Ciaran Costello MYC (11.00); 2, Vincent Varley MYC (14.00); 3, Robert Ferris HYC (16.00)
Published in Howth YC
23rd January 2011

Sheridan Wins HYC Laser Race

HOWTH YACHT CLUB. LASER FROSTBITE SPRING (O'ALL) 23/01/2011 LASER STANDARD: 1, Daragh Sheridan HYC (16.00); 2, Evan Dolan NYC (18.00); 3, David Quinn HYC (19.00); LASER STANDARD APPRENTICE: 1, Conor Murphy HYC (6.00); 2, Darach Dineen HYC (12.00); 3, Conor Hopkins HYC (17.00); LASER STANDARD MASTER: 1, Evan Dolan NYC (12.00); 2, David Quinn HYC (12.00); 3, Daragh Kelleher SSC (13.00); LASER STANDARD GRAND MASTER: 1, Daragh Sheridan HYC (5.00); 2, Robin Hegarty HYC (11.00); 3, Conor Costello MYC (19.00); LASER RADIAL: 1, Robert Ferris HYC (8.00); 2, Vincent Varley MYC (8.00); 3, Ciaran Costello MYC (23.00)

Published in Howth YC
Tagged under

In the three decades and more of the Mitsubishi Motors/Irish Independent "Sailing Club of the Year" assessments, there has never been an organization only seven years old winning the title.

In fact, seniority has often won the day, though in a country in which the oldest sailing clubs date from 1720 (Royal Cork) and 1770 (Lough Derg), it's difficult to find clubs and associations which are anything less than centenarians, let alone not yet in double figures.

But it was only as recently as June 2003 that the Irish Cruiser Racing Association came into being. It was at the biennial Sovereign's Cup series in Kinsale that Fintan Cairns of Dun Laoghaire, enthusiastically supported by the late Jim Donegan of Cork and other key personnel, successfully launched the idea of a nationwide organisation to co-ordinate the racing sport of "boats with lids".

At the time, it was a leap of vision. Having successfully headed Dublin Bay Sailing Club at a time of rapid growth, he was able to see the picture more clearly than those who reckoned that offshore racing organisations should be related to bodies of water rather than a land mass, for all that we're on an island.

Then too, the new association was envisaged as using established clubs and their facilities to stage its championship. In other words, the ICRA organising team would be the travelling people of the Irish sailing scene. On top of that, handicap competition with cruiser-racers was derided as "truck racing" by the white hot one design and dinghy sailors.

Yet the idea took hold, and the annual championship was successfully staged at venues as various as Crosshaven, Tralee, Howth, Kinsale and Dun Laoghaire, with Denis Kiely the essential ace number-cruncher in the back office. And in May 2010, with the mighty machine of the Royal St George YC in Dun Laoghaire providing the administrative centre, the Liebherr Irish Cruiser Nationals in Dublin Bay attracted a fleet of 117 boats, with great sailing.

On that event alone, ICRA would have been among the front runners for Club of the Year. But the best was yet to come. In recessionary times, getting a three boat team together to make a worthwhile challenge for the biennial Rolex International Commodore's Cup was a matter of making the best of limited resources. But ICRA – currently under the leadership of Barry Rose of Cork - was up to the job.

The team of Anthony O'Leary's Antix, Dave Dwyer's marinerscove.ie, and Rob Davis and Andrew Creighton's Roxy 6, had a convincing win. Thus ICRA in one season had catered very well for general run of boats and crews at home, and had come out tops at the top level internationally. It doesn't get better than that, and we salute them as Sailing Club of the Year 2011.

Published in ICRA

A little fleet of boats based in Howth has sailed through three centuries to become the oldest one-design yachts in the world still racing. How did they do it? The answer is an "extraordinary love story" of passion, pride and dedication that is chronicled in "A Century of Sailing". This half-hour documentary follows the 112-year-old Howth 17 fleet through a season of challenges, including the revival of 100-year-old boat-building skills to expand the fleet for the first time in nearly a century. Filmed in high definition against a beautiful scenic backdrop, a DVD of this documentary will be launched with a special screening in Howth Yacht Club next Saturday.

Time: 4pm, Saturday, December 18

Location: Howth Yacht Club, Howth, Co. Dublin

Published in Maritime TV
12 marina managers from Ireland, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Turkey and the UK attended an 'Advanced Marina Managers' course held in Dun Laoghaire last week. The course was organised by the British Marine Federation (BMF) for the Certified Marina Managers organisation. During the course delegates visited marinas in Dun Laoghaire, Howth and Malahide.

As part of the course the group developed a marina scheme for Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club.

By basing the course in Ireland delegates were able to experience at first hand Irish facilities, some for the first time. Sarah Dhandar, Director of Training at the BMF expressed her delight at the venue, "superb facilities, conveniently close by".

Published in Irish Marinas
LASER FROSTBITE WINTER (O'ALL) 14/11/2010 LASER STANDARD: 1, Conor Greagsbey NYC (13.00); 2, Robin Hegarty HYC (21.00); 3, Colm Cunningham HYC (21.00); LASER STANDARD APPRENTICE: 1, Brendan Costello MYC (7.00); 2, Conor Murphy HYC (7.00); 3, Brian Tyrrell HYC (13.00); LASER STANDARD MASTER: 1, Conor Greagsbey NYC (11.00); 2, Colm Cunningham HYC (14.00); 3, Daragh Kelleher SSC (21.00); LASER STANDARD GRAND MASTER: 1, Robin Hegarty HYC (7.00); 2, Michael Evans HYC (10.00); 3, Stephen Quinn HYC (12.00); LASER RADIAL: 1, Darragh Peelo MYC (17.00); 2, Simon Revill HYC (17.00); 3, Ciaran Costello MYC (20.00)
Published in Laser
HOWTH YACHT CLUB. BRASS MONKEYS WINTER (RACE) 14/11/2010 Class 2 HPH: 1, Papillon B O'Halloran; 2, C'est la Vie Flannelly/Others; 3, Maximus P Kyne; Class 3 HPH: 1, Tobago Hanna/Others; 2, Runaway Higgins/Others; 3, Just Good Friends M Carroll; Class 1 Non Spinny HPH: 1, Thar Saile C O'Laoi; 2, Puffin Eile F & P Newport; 3, Demelza Ennis/Laudan; Class 3 Non Spinny HPH: 1, Sunchaser M Marr; 2, Hippocampus B O'Loughlin; 3, Midnight Sun Howard/Others. 
Published in Howth YC
1st November 2010

Cull Wins Howth Laser Opener

HOWTH YACHT CLUB. LASER FROSTBITE WINTER (O'ALL) 31/10/2010 LASER STANDARD: 1, Joe Cull HYC (2.00); 2, David Quinn HYC (6.00); 3, Evan Dolan NYC (6.00); LASER STANDARD APPRENTICE: 1, Brendan Costello MYC (2.00); 2, Conor Hopkins HYC (4.00); LASER STANDARD MASTER: 1, David Quinn HYC (4.00); 2, Evan Dolan NYC (4.00); 3, Conor Greagsber NYC (7.00); LASER STANDARD GRAND MASTER: 1, Joe Cull HYC (2.00); 2, Michael Evans HYC (6.00); 3, Robin Hegarty HYC (6.00); LASER RADIAL: 1, Darragh Peelo MYC (2.00); 2, Simon Revill HYC (4.00); 3, Ciaran Costello MYC (6.00)

Published in Laser
Ireland's biggest Laser sailing dinghy series starts in over a week and organiser Dave Quinn has been in touch with ten good reasons to race in the 2010 Howth Laser Frostbite series on Sunday 31st October. We're sure there's many more but here's Dave's top ten:

1) This is the biggest series in Ireland, typically with over 50 entries

2) Howth welcome - great pre and post race social atmosphere in club.
3) Great Racing - Two short races per day, in open water just outside the harbour with committee boat starts. Great way to work on your helming and tactics over the winter.
4) Mix of competition - Sailors range from top 5 ranked sailors all the way through to beginners and casual racers. Ages range from 15-65.
5) Laser Round the Island and Lunch - A legendary, not to be missed end of season race, and party in March.
6) Great value - €4 per race, which covers the lunch in March also!
7) Free boat parking - entry fee also covers parking your boat in Howth the the full winter.
8) Dedicated race course - No other classes racing. Mix of windward leeward and triangle courses.
9) Full Rig, Radial and 4.7 fleets all supported
10) Friendly advice, guidance and help make it a great introduction to dinghy racing

Enter online at www.hyc.ie. For enquiries contact David Quinn 086 2835671

Published in Howth YC
At the weekend's end of season Optimist dinghy class Championships (aka the Gorman Trophy) held at the National Yacht Club in Dun Laoghaire local helmsman Sean Donnelly was a popular win in a fleet of 66 boats. Second was Sean Waddilove from across the bay in Howth and third was Dun Laoghaire's Adam Hyland from the Royal St. George YC. Results HERE.
Published in Optimist
Page 26 of 28

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020