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Displaying items by tag: IMDO

#Ports&Shipping - The Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) the State agency responsible for the development, promotion and marketing of the shipping and services sector, have produced a report, "Implications of Brexit on the Use of the Landbridge".

Published online yesterday by the IMDO, the report uses quantitative and qualitative methods to determine the volume of Irish imports and exports that use the UK landbridge on an annual basis.  In addition the report proposes seven Government recommendations to mitigate against any negative impacts of Brexit on Irish economic sectors and transport routes.

The report was carried out under terms of reference set by the Department of Transport,Tourism and Sport. The study quantifies the volume of Irish import and export traffic that uses Landbridge. It also establishes the drivers of the choice to use the landbridge

Assisting the report study were the Irish Exporters Association (IEA), the Irish Road Haulage Association (IRHA), the Freight Transport Association of Ireland (FTA Ireland), Dr.Stephen Hynes, economics lecturer at NUI Galway, and director of the Socio-Economic Marine Research Unit (SEMRU), Dr. Andreas Tsakiridis, research associate in marine economics at SEMRU.

To view and or download the Report, click here.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#Ports&Shipping - Take the opportunity to enter the Export Industry Awards 'Maritime Competitive Edge Award' sponsored by the Irish Maritime Development Office.

The IMDO posted an update yesterday to highlight the award among 11 categories at the annual Export Industry Awards organised by the Irish Exporters Association (IEA). The awards recognise the remarkable achievements of companies working in the export industry. Companies can enter from 11 Categories and be in with a chance to be selected as the 2018 Exporter of the Year. 

To meet the criteria for consideration for the IMDO sponsored 'Maritime Competitive Edge Award', the company must be able to demonstrate how their service has led to export success in the maritime shipping services sector.

There is no application fee, however voting looms as it closes this Sunday 16th September.

For further information on the Award's objective and criteria click here and with a link to enter online.

All winners will be announced at the Gala Dinner on Friday, 16th November, held at the Clayton Hotel, Burlington Road in Dublin.

Tickets are available by clicking here.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#Ports&Shipping - The Irish Maritime Transport Economist, a report produced by the Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) on Ireland’s maritime freight industry, was launched recently in Dublin.

The report now in its 15th year, shows that in 2017, total port traffic increased by 6%, with growth driven predominantly by unitised trade, Roll-on/Roll-off (RoRo) and Lift-on/Lift-off (LoLo) traffic, both of which grew by 4% in 2017.

The report also highlights a 14% increase in the number of cruise vessel calls into ports across the island of ireland, with 324 calls recorded in 2017.Passenger numbers between the island of Ireland, Great Britain and continental Europe reached 4.29 million passengers in 2017.

Key figures

  • 6% increase in total Irish port traffic recorded in 2017
  • 4% increase in Irish RoRo traffic to 1,120,438 freight units
  • 4% increase in Irish LoLo traffic to 731,451 TEUs*
  • 6% increase in total Irish bulk traffic
  • Overall, passenger ferry traffic slightly increased at less than 1% in 2017 to 4.29 million
  • 14% increase in cruise vessel calls recorded to ports on the island of Ireland.

Freight traffic

There was a 6% increase in overall shipping activity in 2017, with positive growth across all four quarters. Growth was driven by the LoLo and RoRo sectors, with activity increasing in both sectors by 4%. Ro/Ro traffic is a reliable indicator of the trade between Ireland and the UK. The UK accounted for 26% of ROI’s EU exports (+2% compared to 2016), a total of €16 billion. For EU imports, the figure from the UK is higher at 39% (+3%), amounting to €17 billion in value terms.

Total Bulk volume for the ROI grew by 6% to 30.3 million tonnes in 2017. This is the second consecutive year of growth, exceeding the 29.8 million tonnes figure recorded for 2015. All twelve ROI ports recorded increases in traffic for 2017. The last time Total Bulk through ROI ports recorded year-on-year growth was from 2010 – 2012.

Passenger traffic

Passenger numbers between the island of Ireland, the UK and Continental Europe saw only marginal growth of less than 1% in 2017. A total of just over 4.29 million passengers travelled on the Central, Continental, Northern and Southern Corridors. Just over 18,000 additional passengers were recorded to have travelled on these routes in 2017. This follows two years of decline in this market in 2016 (-2%) and 2015 (-3%).

Ireland’s cruise industry, however, has recorded steady growth since 2011, with 2014 as the only year recording a decrease in calls. An average of 9% increase in traffic has been observed throughout this period. 2017 was the highest year for calls into ports on the island of Ireland, a 61% increase from 201 calls to eight ports in 2011, to 324 call into ten ports in 2017. Passenger numbers have increased by 93% from 214,623 in 2011 to 415,115 in 2017.

Moving Forward

The IMDO is undertaking a number of important studies in 2018. Concerns have been raised about the likely impacts of Brexit on landbridge traffic and the flexibility that exists within the maritime industry to deal with significant modal shifts.The IMDO has undertaken research to address these concerns. The second study being undertaken is to look into the capacity of Ireland’s ports network. The third study undertaken is to examine the current capacities, infrastructure, facilities and services that ports must offer the developing offshore renewable energy sector, to include wind, wave and tidal energy resources.

The Irish economy remains heavily dependent on seaborne transport, with more that 90% of our merchandise trade moving by sea. Our maritime industry has shown itself to be responsive to changing market conditions and capable of flexing capacity to meet demand. It is noteworthy that there are major redevelopment projects underway in our Tier 1 ports. Dublin Port is currently constructing approximately 3km of quay walls and deepening the harbour basin and channel to accommodate larger vessels. The Port of Cork is working towards the relocation of much of the port’s traffic to a purpose built facility in Ringaskiddy that will accommodate larger vessels and increase capacity to meet the growing demands of the region. Shannon Foynes Port Company (SFPC) has, through its Master Planning Exercise, identified opportunities to increase the port’s capacity, particularly in relation bulk cargo flows and recognises the potential that exists within the Shannon Estuary to service the needs of the agricultural and energy sectors amongst others, building on the potential that deep water and available development land can offer various industrial users. Together, Irish ports are preparing for the future and meeting the objectives set out in National Ports Policy (2013) by leading the development of port capacity to facilitate economic growth.

Speaking at the launch of the 15th edition of the Irish Maritime Transport Economist, Liam Lacey, Director, IMDO, said: “2017 has been a successful year for the Irish maritime industry and although 2018 will bring challenges related to Brexit and other geopolitical factors, the ability of the industry to respond to such challenges was not in doubt. Our ports, shipping companies and policy makers have shown themselves to be responsive and adaptable in a very competitive environment and that experience lends confidence to their ability to meet future challenges.”

A full copy of the report can be accessed here.

Published in Irish Ports

#ports&shipping - Following the Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) attendance of last week's LISW17, the Irish government shipping agency will also be attending the Connecting Europe Conference taking place this week in the Estonian capital of Tallinn.

The IMDO will also be exhibiting at the two-day event held at the Nordea Concert Hall between 21-22 September.

The event is being organised by the European Commission, Directorate-General for Mobility and Transport (DG MOVE), in cooperation with the Estonian Presidency of the Council of the European Union and Ministry of Economic Affairs and Infrastructure of the Republic of Estonia.

At the Connecting Europe Facility Conference in Tallinn, a number of key Irish ports and enterprising marine companies in areas of ICT and digitalisation will exhibit together with Ireland’s Marine Development Team and the Irish Maritime Development Office to communicate Ireland’s marine opportunity.

Our delegation is keen to build connections for potential collaborations in future projects, especially in the in the area of research, and to discuss Ireland's strengths in areas such as Digital Ocean, Smart Ports and the development of Ireland's ICT cluster.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#ferry - Afloat last week featured Dublin Discovered Boat Tours, the capital's only dedicated operator on the Liffey, among it's London counterparts are MBNA Thames Clippers which introduced brand new craft but also commissioned to transport commuters, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The newbuild Jupiter Clippper with capacity for 172 passengers is the youngest member of MBNA Thames Clippers having entered service last month following debut of sister Mercury Clipper. They join a fleet providing rapid transport services through central London on various routes based between Putney in the west to Royal Woolwich Arsenal in the east.

Both craft represent (as Afloat reported last year) the largest fast commercial passenger ferries contracted from a UK shipyard in over 25 years and to serve in the nation's coastal waters. The pair made the 200 nautical mile delivery passage from Wight Shipyard Co Ltd on the Isle of Wight to the Trinity Buoy Wharf in east London.

Combined the passenger catamarans form a £6.3 million investment in London’s port and transport infrastructure to provide an additional 14% capacity and increased frequency cross the River Thames network. They are the most technically advanced and energy efficient fast ferries so far for MBNA Thames Clippers that now totals a fleet of 17 craft. The operator expects by the end of 2017 to have carried over four million commuters and tourists alike on Old Father Thames.

The build process took 10 months to complete Jupiter Clipper and Mercury Clipper and this led to the creation of over 75 new jobs across the Isle of Wight and London in the process. The 35m long catamarans are of the Hunt Class Mark 2, designed by Australian naval architects One2Three based in Sydney. They are built to ultra-high specifications among them incorperating a low-wash hull design likewsise of near sisters Clipper Neptune and Galaxy Clipper of the Hunt Class. These slightly smaller 150 passenger capacity craft having only entered service in 2015, make up the most modern and largest fleet on the Thames.

Also as part of river developments before the end of this year will be the completion of three piers added to the MBNA Thames Clipper commuter network. The locations are Plantation Wharf Pier, Westminster Pier and Battersea Power Station Pier.

MBNA Thames Clippers are committed to making the river as accessible to as many people as possible. Also their support of the Port of London Authority (PLA) Thames Vision of doubling the number of people travelling by river and its target of 20 million commuter and tourist trips every year.

As part of the last week's London International Shipping Week attended by the IMDO, a private charter of Thames Clipper was planned by LISW17 for delegates to take a special excursion of the PLA terminals. Among them in London's east docklands is located in Erith (Conway's berth for aggregates) and where during LISW17 Afloat had tracked down cargoship Arklow Resolve (see rare Dublin Cargoship Call to 'Docklands')

It was at this same berth in Erith, that Afloat had also followed Arklow Resolve make a previous call in late August, having finally departed Dublin Port notably where the 2,999grt cargoship had made a rare layover period of more than a month. This took place in the capital's old inner port that is referred as the 'Docklands' quarter, the Irish equivalent of London's Canary Wharf occupied by the financial services sector.

Published in Ferry

#ports&shipping - Mr. Adrian O'Neill the recently appointed Ambassador of Ireland to the UK hosted a joint reception with the Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) on Wednesday during London International Shipping Week, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The IMDO which is the Irish government's development, promotional and marketing agency for the shipping and shipping services sectors held the evening networking reception for clients of LISW at the Irish Embassy in Grosvenor Place.

Ambassador O'Neill welcomed international shipping firms and related sectors of the industry to the Embassy. Also attending the event was an Irish delegation from Government agencies and industry representatives.

The annual ‘must attend’ international event is worth £22bn alone to the UK Maritime sector. This year more than 160 industry functions and unique networking opportunities for leaders across all sectors of the industry were organised.

Those taking part from the industry were– regulators, charterers, ship owners, ship managers, bunker suppliers, lawyers, ship brokers, bankers, insurers, insurance brokers, commodity traders and brokers, ship suppliers, port operators, shipping service providers and many more.

 

Published in Ports & Shipping

#Shipping - Shipping and port activity in the Republic of Ireland rose by 1% in the second quarter of 2017 when compared to the corresponding period of 2016, according to the latest iShip Index published by the Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO).

Unitised traffic — which consists of roll-on/roll-off (RORO) and lift-on/lift-off (LOLO) traffic — continued to rise, growing by 3% when compared to Q2 2016.

The majority of RORO traffic moves between Ireland and Great Britain, meaning this freight segment is a simple but reliable indicator as to the level of trade between both economies.

The RORO freight sector for the Republic of Ireland saw volume growth of 3% in the second quarter of 2017. This is the fifth consecutive Q2 increase in this freight category.

As for LOLO (containership) traffic, exports in the Republic of Ireland (ROI) rose by 7.4% compared to Q2 2016, while imports remained relatively unchanged — rising by 0.9%. Overall, LOLO traffic in ROI increased by 3.7% to 184,673 TEU.

When reviewing unitised traffic, it is worth noting that both LOLO and RORO freight segments move in an all-island setting. Therefore, when Northern Irish ports are included, all-island RORO volumes grew by 2% in Q2 2017.

All-island LOLO traffic grew by 3.5%, with all-island imports and exports rising by 1.1% and 6.6% respectively compared to Q2 2016.

NI RORO volumes grew by 2%, while NI LOLO traffic grew by 2.8%. This was driven primarily by 4% growth in NI LOLO exports.

The bulk traffic segment saw tonnage volumes decrease by 1% (excluding transhipments) in the Republic of Ireland when compared to the same period last year. This was driven primarily by a 3% fall in Dry Bulk tonnage.

Break bulk volumes grew by 3%, while liquid Bulk traffic remained stable compared to Q2 2016.

Summary of Shipping Volumes for Republic of Ireland:

Summary of Shipping Volumes for Republic of Ireland Q2 2017

Published in Ports & Shipping

#iShipIndex- According to the iShip Index recently published by the Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) shipping and port activity in the Republic of Ireland rose by 7% in the first quarter of 2017 when compared to the corresponding period of 2016.

The latest analysis indicates that all five of the principal freight segments saw volume increases in the first quarter of 2017. Unitised traffic - which consists of Roll-on/Roll-off (Ro/Ro) and Lift-on/Lift-off (Lo/Lo) traffic - continued to rise, growing by 5% when compared to Q1 2016.

The majority of Ro/Ro traffic moves between Ireland and Great Britain, meaning this freight segment is a simple but reliable indicator as to the level of trade between both economies. The Ro/Ro freight sector for the Republic of Ireland saw volume growth of 7% in the first quarter of 2017.This is the fifth consecutive Q1 increase in this freight category.

As for Lo/Lo (containership) traffic, Lo/Lo exports in the Republic of Ireland (ROI) rose by 6% compared to Q1 2016, while Lo/Lo imports remained relatively unchanged – rising by 0.5%. Overall, Lo/Lo traffic in ROI increased by 3% to 174,248 TEU.

When reviewing unitised traffic it should be noted that both Lo/Lo and Ro/Ro freight segments move in an all-island setting. Therefore, when Northern Irish (NI) ports are included, all-island Ro/Ro volumes grew by 6% in Q1 2017. All-island Lo/Lo traffic grew by 0.7%, with all-island imports and exports rising by 0.4% and 1% respectively, compared to Q1 2016. NI Ro/Ro volumes grew by 5%, while NI Lo/Lo traffic contracted by 6%. This was driven primarily by an 11% drop in NI Lo/Lo exports.

The Bulk traffic segment saw tonnage volumes grow by 8% (excluding transhipments) in the Republic of Ireland when compared to the same period last year. This was driven primarily by an11% increase in Dry Bulk tonnage, as well as 10% growth in Break Bulk volumes. This is the largest level of Dry Bulk volume recorded since the iShip index began in 2007. The relatively large expansion in Dry Bulk reflects the fact that a high degree of volume fluctuation exists in this market when viewed on a quarterly basis. As for Break Bulk volumes, this is the largest quarter on quarter increase in this segment since Q2 2015.

*The iShip index is a volume index for all freight traffic moving to and from the Republic of Ireland. This does not include passengers or transshipment activity.

Published in Ports & Shipping
Tagged under

#FerryFigures – According to the 14th edition of the Irish Maritime Transport Economist report launched today, there was a decline of 2.6% in ferry passenger numbers in 2016.

The figure relates to those travelling between the island of Ireland, Britain and continental Europe that amounted to 4.3 million passengers.

The report on Ireland’s maritime industry including freight, produced by the Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) also revealed that the largest decline in the ferry passenger traffic was recorded between the Republic of Ireland and Great Britain. In this operating region the decline in passenger numbers of 5% to 2.2 million was recorded last year.

This decline in sea passenger traffic is in contract to strong growth in air passenger traffic.

Car volumes to and from the island of Ireland also decreased by 1% in 2016, to 1.28 million.

A full copy of the report can be downloaded from this link. 

Published in Ferry

#MaritimeReport - The 14th edition of the Irish Maritime Transport Economist report produced by the Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) on Ireland’s maritime freight industry was launched today. 

The report shows that in 2016, total port traffic increased by 2%, with growth driven predominantly by unitised trade, Roll-on/Roll-off (RoRo) and Lift-on/Lift-off (LoLo) traffic, both of which grew by 7% in 2016.

Also highlighted in the report was an increase of 11% in the number of cruiseship calls to Irish ports, with 274 calls recorded in 2016, while (ferry) passenger numbers between the island of Ireland, Great Britain and continental Europe declined by 2.6% to 4.3 million passengers in 2016.

Key figures

· 2% increase in total port traffic recorded in 2016

· 7% increase in RoRo traffic to 1,073,403 freight units

· 7% increase in LoLo traffic to 916,852 TEUs*

· 5% decline in total bulk traffic, driven by reduced demand for oil, coal and other bulk commodities

· Overall passenger traffic declined 2.6% in 2016, but 11% increase in cruise vessel calls recorded

Freight traffic

The growth recorded in unitised trade, which is closely correlated with consumer demand, points to increased consumer confidence in the Irish economy in 2016. With over 80% of RoRo traffic moving between the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom, the growth in RoRo traffic recorded in 2016 is also a reliable proxy for the performance of trade between both economies, despite economic and political uncertainty in 2016.

In contrast, total bulk traffic, comprising dry bulk, liquid bulk and break bulk, fell by 5% in 2016 to 28.5 million tonnes. Dry bulk volumes fell by 1% to 15.8 million tonnes and liquid bulk volumes fell by 9% to 11.3 million tonnes in 2016, with demand for commodities in these categories such as animal feeds, fertilizer, coal and oil affected by relatively warm and dry weather conditions. Break bulk traffic fell by 5% to 1.4 million tonnes, mainly driven by a 40% decrease in shipment of refuse derived fuel. When these shipments are excluded, break bulk traffic grew by 2% in 2016, with increases recorded in the shipment of commodities such as cement, which underpin growth in the Irish construction sector.

Passenger traffic

Figures for 2016 show a decline of 2.6% in passenger numbers between the island of Ireland, Great Britain and continental Europe to 4.3 million passengers. The largest decline in passenger traffic was recorded between the Republic of Ireland and Great Britain, with a decline in passenger numbers of 5% to 2.2 million recorded in 2016. This decline in sea passenger traffic is in contract to strong growth in air passenger traffic in 2016. Car volumes to and from the island of Ireland also decreased by 1% in 2016, to 1.28 million.

Ireland’s cruise industry, however, recorded growth in 2016 with an 11% increase in vessel calls in 2016. 274 vessels called to Irish ports in 2016 carrying 442,304 passengers and crew. Dublin Port remained Ireland’s busiest cruise terminal with 109 vessel calls carrying 159,124 passengers and crew, a 7% increase in passenger traffic from 2015.

Speaking at the launch of the 14th edition of the Irish Maritime Transport Economist, Liam Lacey, Director, IMDO, said: “As a maritime nation and an economy, we are heavily dependent on seaborne transport to link Ireland to world markets. While 2016 was a challenging year for business, the overall increase in port traffic and strong growth in unitised trade demonstrates the resilience of Ireland’s maritime industry in continuing to meet the needs of our growing economy. While the impact of Brexit on the trading environment is not immediately apparent in bilateral trade volumes recorded between Ireland and the UK in the second half of 2016, our maritime industry is influenced by factors such as exchange rate fluctuations that will continue to evolve in 2017.”

A full copy of the report can be accessed here.

Published in Ports & Shipping
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020