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Displaying items by tag: IMDO

#Forum - The 2017 Maritime Commerce Forum will take place as a lunch-time event held in Dublin on Thursday 9th March. The time for the forum is from 12.30pm – 2.30pm and will be held at The Marker Hotel, Grand Canal Square. The venue is located in the capital's 'Docklands' quarter. 

The event will follow on from a series of meetings held last year to discuss opportunities for Ireland in the area of ship leasing, maritime finance and maritime taxation. Given important developments, such as Brexit, which have occurred since the last meeting, the Forum looks forward to bringing this group together to discuss key opportunities for Ireland in light of a changing global environment. To launch the Forum this year and as a guest speaker is Mr. Alan Dukes, Chairman, Asia Matters.

Alan Dukes is the Chairman and co-founder of Asia Matters. He was a member of the Dáil (lower House of the Irish Parliament) for twenty-one years and during his political career served as the Irish Minister for Agriculture, Finance, Justice and Transport and Energy and Communications.

Alan was Leader of the Fine Gael Party for three years and was Chairman of the Irish Parliament’s Foreign Affairs Committee. He is a former Governor of the International Monetary Fund and a former Governor of the World Bank.

In his work at Asia Matters, he is strongly committed to the importance of two way benefits in Asia Ireland bilateral trade relations.

To reserve a place at the event from the Irish Maritime Development Office, RSVP to [email protected] by this Thursday 2nd March.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#iShipIndex - The latest iShip Index published by the Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) shows that shipping and port activity in the Republic of Ireland fell by 2% in the fourth quarter of 2016 when compared to the corresponding period of 2015 .

This contraction is largely explained by a 7% contraction in Bulk traffic which was in turn driven by a 10% fall in Dry Bulk freight. At the same time, Lift-on Lift-off (Lo-Lo) and Roll-on Roll-off (Ro-Ro) volumes, which are more closely correlated with consumer demand, rose by 6% and 5% respectively.

Breaking down the figures

Roll-on Roll-off (Ro-Ro) Traffic:

Over 80% of ROI Ro-Ro traffic moves between the United Kingdom (UK) and the Republic of Ireland (ROI). And is a reliable proxy for to the performance of trade between both economies.
In Q4 2016, total Ro-Ro traffic in the ROI grew by 7% , with volumes between the ROI and the UK Ro-up by 6%, while Ro-Ro traffic between ROI and Continental Europe saw a 10% rise against Q4 2015.

Lift-on Lift-off (Lo/Lo) Traffic:

In Q4 2016, laden Lo-Lo traffic in the ROI grew by 5% year on year. On a full year basis, laden Lo-Lo traffic increased by 6% compared to January – December 2015. Laden imports were up by 4%, while laden exports increased by 7%. When Northern Irish ports are included, laden Lo-Lo traffic growth was 5%. This figure was driven by laden import growth of 3%, and laden export growth of 7% for the island as a whole.

Bulk:

Total Bulk traffic for the ROI contracted by 7% in the 4th quarter of 2016. When Northern Irish ports are included, the contraction in total Bulk traffic for the island of Ireland was 4%.

The 7% drop in ROI bulk traffic was driven primarily by a 10% drop-off in Dry Bulk traffic. This market segment was particularly affected by a decline in volumes of coal and animal feed, down 51% and 9% respectively. Liquid bulk traffic in the ROI fell by 4% in Q4 2016, while ROI Break Bulk traffic saw 3% growth.

Offsetting the contraction in ROI Bulk, Northern Irish ports saw 6% growth in Total Bulk traffic in Q4, which meant that all island total bulk traffic fell by 4% when compared to the previous year.

There was a 2% drop in all-island Liquid bulk and a 5% drop in all-island Dry Bulk. All-island break bulk however, saw 5% growth, driven by an 11% increase in Northern Ireland Break Bulk traffic.

The Central Bank in its most recent bulletin noted that to date, due to the absence of any weakening in the U.K economy, the impact on the Irish economy has been through the volatility of the euro/sterling exchange rate. Forecasted GDP growth remains positive.

The Central Bank went on to say that while consumer sentiment (as measured by the ESRI consumer sentiment index) declined in Q4 2016, it has rebounded to its highest level since June 2016.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#BlueEconomy - The Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) is inviting tenders for the supply of services to develop a new ‘umbrella style’ brand identity for Ireland’s ‘blue economy’.

The new tender from the IMDO – the Government agency responsible for the development, promotion and marketing of the Ireland’s maritime sector – would involve the development of a brand story, guidelines and video to communicate Ireland’s overall marine offering on a B2B basis, both nationally and internationally.

The new brand identity is to be developed in support of the recently established Marine Development Team (MDT), a specific-purpose, Government-funded task force that will work in collaboration with a number of Government development agencies with the overall goal of developing Ireland’s ocean economy.

The closing date for responses is Tuesday 14 February. Find out more about this tender HERE.

Published in News Update
Tagged under

#Forum - The Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) hosted an inaugural meeting of the Ship Commerce Forum as the first industry event of 2016. The event was held on Thursday 18th of February at Wilton Park House in Dublin.

The event entitled ‘Maritime Finance: Opportunities for Ireland’ was well attended with a broad spectrum of representatives from professional services firms, financial institutions, international shipping companies as well as representatives from international asset leasing companies based in Ireland.

The round table event was created to initiate an industry focused debate on the current opportunities for Ireland in the maritime finance industry as well as the barriers that exist. Discussion also considered how Ireland could become a centre for maritime finance leveraging on the established leasing support services and expertise available here.

The IMDO Director, Liam Lacey, put forward some broad questions centred around Ireland’s potential as a maritime finance hub. He spoke at length about Ireland’s strength as a location for Foreign Direct Investment and success in other industries, whilst at the same time drawing attention to the opportunities inherent in Ireland’s current underperformance in the Maritime sector.

After a period of intra table debate and presenting back ideas Yvonne Thompson, Tax Partner at PwC gave a summation of the night’s discussion and highlighted some of Ireland’s strengths which make us an ideal location for companies involved in Maritime Commerce.

Growth and development of Ireland’s Maritime Commerce sector is an important initiative which ties into government ambitions outlined in Harnessing Our Ocean Wealth, the IMDO aims to create a forum through which industry views can be channelled and lessons learned.

The forthcoming Harnessing Our Ocean Wealth will take place in Galway on the 1st of July as part of the Marine Institute’s 3rd annual event SeaFest 2016. 

Published in Ports & Shipping

#iShipIndexQ3 - Shipping and port activity in the Republic of Ireland rose by 12% in the third quarter of 2015 when compared with the same period in 2014.The figures are from the latest quarterly iShipIndex* published by the Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO).

The latest analysis also indicates that all of the five principal freight segments grew during that period.

Unitised traffic, which consists of Roll-on/Roll-off (Ro/Ro) and Lift-on/Lift-off (Lo/Lo) traffic, continued to rise steadily and has now shown consistent growth for an extended period, with an average growth rate of 6% per quarter in unitised traffic since Q2 2013 as measured by the iShip Index.

The majority of Ro/Ro traffic moves between Ireland and Great Britain and this freight segment is a simple but reliable indicator of the level of trade between both economies. Encouragingly, the Ro/Ro freight sector saw volume growth of 6% in the third quarter to 254,068 units.

Lo/Lo laden imports have now risen for eight consecutive quarters, reaching 96,828 teu in Q3, 2015. Lo/Lo laden exports grew 0.4% from the previous quarter to reach 68,249 teu in Q3, 2015. Overall, Lo/Lo container traffic increased 2% to 165,076 teu in the same period.

When reviewing unitised traffic, it is worth noting that both Lo/Lo and Ro/Ro freight move in an all-Island setting. Therefore, when Northern Irish ports are included, all-island Ro/Ro volume grew by 5% in Q3 2015. All Island traffic in the Lo/Lo laden sector grew 3% overall, with imports rising 3% and exports by 4% for Q3 2015.

The overall bulk traffic segment saw tonnage volumes increase by 19%, excluding transhipments, when compared to the previous year. Liquid bulk increased substantially by 31%. However, this increase was driven to a large extent by a temporary anomaly in the market in Q3 2014. Break bulk, which largely consists of imports of construction and project related commodities, increased by 6%. Break bulk has now seen ten consecutive quarterly increases.

There was a 12% increase in dry bulk traffic for Q3 2015 with trade in cement and animal feed showing significant growth. However, there is a high degree of fluctuation in traffic volume typical in the dry bulk market when viewed on a quarterly basis.

Note: *The iShip index is a volume index for all freight traffic moved to and from the Republic of Ireland. This does not include passengers, and transshipment activity.

Note: All freight and passenger comparisons are done on a quarterly basis (Q3 2015 v Q3 2014).

 

 

Published in Ports & Shipping

#ShippingVolumes - Irish ports and shipping activity rose by 7% in the fourth quarter of 2014 when compared to the corresponding period of 2013.

The figures released today are from the quarterly iShip Index* published by the Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO).

The latest analysis also indicates that four of the five principal freight segments grew in the second quarter of 2014.

The Ro/Ro freight segment experienced volume growth of 4% in the fourth quarter to 429,814 units and is the eighth consecutive quarterly increase in Ro/Ro traffic, the majority of which moves between Ireland and Great Britain and is a simple but reliable indicator of the level of trade between both economies.

Container traffic (Lo/Lo) grew by 8% to 157,077 units. Encouragingly, container imports have now risen for five consecutive quarters. Container exports continued to grow, increasing by 4% to 67,888 units.

The overall bulk traffic segment saw tonnage volumes increase by 7% when compared to the previous year. Break bulk, which largely consists of imports of construction and project related commodities, increased by 16%.

Break bulk has now seen seven consecutive quarterly increases. Liquid bulk also rose by 16% and dry bulk increased by 1%, having both experienced negative growth in recent quarters.

For a breakdown of figures for the previous quarter, Q3 of 2014, click HERE

*The iShip index is a volume index for all freight traffic moved to and from the Republic of Ireland. This does not include passengers or trans-shipment activity.

Note: All freight and passenger comparisons are done on a quarterly basis (Q4 2013 v Q4 2014).

Published in Ports & Shipping

#IrishTonnageTax - The Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) has released a report Irish Tonnage Tax: Opportunities for the International Shipping Industry.

The Irish tonnage tax regime has been established for over 10 years and offers one of the most competitive on-shore corporate tax rates to international shipping companies.

The tonnage tax report was produced by independent experts PwC and details the benefits of locating a maritime operation in Ireland. The report provides an update on Ireland's extensive double tax treaty network.

Ireland's role is highlighted in its expertise in asset leasing and for having a well developed structured finance regime which can be directly applied to international maritime financing.

The Irish tonnage tax is derived from a 'notional' profit calculated based on the tonnage of a vessel, which is then subject to the Irish corporate tax rate of 12.5%.

The IMDO is the Irish government agency which provides support and advice to Maritime companies setting up operations in Ireland. In his forward to the report, IMDO Director Liam Lacey says 'this publication provides independent validation of Ireland's status as a world class location in which to conduct business and more particularly, sets Ireland apart as a hub for maritime commerce'.

As a country, Ireland continues to maintain its reputation as a pro-business environment that has attracted investment from some of the world's largest companies over the past three decades.

In Forbes' 2014 annual ranking of the Best Countries for Business, Ireland was named number one country in the world for business.

More recently, figures released by the Irish Central Statistics Office (CSO) show that the national economy grew by more than seven times the EU average between April and June 2014. This is the strongest growth rate recorded in Ireland since the early 2000's, showing a strong and stable recovery.

Continuing in this vein, the Irish Economic and Social Research Institute (ERSI) predict that Ireland's GNP is to grow by approximately 5% in 2014 and 5.3% in 2015.

Irish Tonnage Tax: Opportunities for the International Shipping Industry is available to download by clicking HERE

For more information on the report and locating a maritime operation in Ireland, contact Rebecca Wardell by calling +353 (0)1 476 6518 / +353 (0)87 798 0089 or email: [email protected]

 

Published in Ports & Shipping

#IrishMaritimeForum – The inaugural Irish Maritime Forum recently held in Cork was attended by more than 150 delegates representing the shipping industry, various stakeholders and departments and the Irish government agency, the Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO).

According to the IMDO, they were delighted to join an exciting line up of speakers for the event's main seminar entitled 'Developing the Dynamic Future of Ireland's Maritime Sector' which was hosted by the Port of Cork in partnership with the Irish Ports Association.

Combined they gathered industry leaders from across the Irish maritime sector to the conference that was opened by Minister Sean Sherlock TD, who spoke of the importance of ports as strategic points for trade growth, both nationally and internationally. The minister also drew attention to the recent uplift in port volumes as indicated by the IMDO's iship index.

A cross section of the Maritime world was in evidence with port operators, department representatives, pilots, stevedores, European officials, educators, mariners and many more all contributing to meaningful debate during the conference and well into the break out times.

Speaking at the event, the IMDO's Business Development Manager Rebecca Wardell, emphasised the necessity for ports to look at potential areas of innovation, efficiency in work practices, competition across services and planning the means to meet future capacity demands over a 20 year plus horizon.

She also stressed the IMDO's commitment to be involved in an on-going collaborative process to assist ports in this regard.

The importance of a forum such as this cannot be underestimated, creating a unique opportunity for those in the industry to come together and develop ideas for the future of the sector. This is particularly relevant at present with significant government support for the development of the sector evidenced by the cross departmental strategy, Harvesting Our Ocean's Wealth.

On a related note, another major conference Our Ocean Wealth was held last June in Dublin, for more details about the work of 'harvesting' our national resources, visit: www.ouroceanwealth.ie

Following the conclusion of the Irish Maritime Forum, a Gala Dinner that evening was hosted by the Irish Institute of Master Mariners, for further details about the IMM: www.mastermariners.com

For further information on the role of the IMDO including the iShip Index and much visit: www.imdo.ie

 

Published in Ports & Shipping

#VacancyIMDO – The Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) which was established by Statute in December 1999 and commenced operations in July 2000, is currently inviting applications for the position of Business Development Manager.

The Business Development manager will be responsible for delivering new clients in a pressurised and competitive environment.

For further details of the job description click HERE and as how to apply. Noting the closing date of applications must be received by 17:00 on Friday 23rd May 2014.

 

Published in Jobs

#ShortSea14 – This year's ShortSea European conference will take place in the Portugese capital of Lisbon (12-13 May), and follows previous conferences held in Paris 2013 and Dublin the proceeding year.

It will be supported by the Shortsea Promotion Centres from the Maritime Member States of the EU, and the conference will be an ideal opportunity to keep up to date in developments and trends.

In addition the venue is where you can meet your peers and to network in the industry.

For further information, click to download conference programme.

 

Published in Ports & Shipping
Page 3 of 7

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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