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Displaying items by tag: Inland Fisheries Ireland

#Fishing - Fishermen wishing to apply for oyster dredging licences for the 2017 season must apply with the official form via the relevant River Basin District Office before 12 noon on Friday 25 November.

Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) say this process became necessary due to the many Special Areas of Conservation and Natura 2000 sites in Ireland that also contain oyster fisheries.

As the exploitation of these fisheries will requires dredging, appropriate assessment of these fishing activities will have to be undertaken.

In the absence of appropriate assessments, against predetermined conservation objectives, it is necessary to ensure that no intensification of the fishing activity for oysters be permitted.

This has been further strengthened by the issuing of a direction from the Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine in accordance with Section 278 (5)(a) of the Fisheries (Consolidation) Act 1959 as amended and the Habitats Directive as transposed by European Commission (Birds and Natural Habitats) Regulations 2011 (SI 477/ 2011).

For further information on the official application procedure, visit the IFI website HERE.

Published in Fishing

#Angling - A new fund to support projects for sustainable and accessible angling in Ireland has been launched by Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI).

The Capital Works Fund of €500,000 is available for angling groups and clubs who are looking to improve access and infrastructure for angling.

The fund is aimed specifically at capital improvement works, with grants available to all groups and individuals including local development associations, tidy towns, angling clubs and others looking to improve access to angling.

The types of projects eligible for funding must provide for public access and include the following:

  • Clearing and fencing along rivers/ lakes to allow access for angling.
  • Disability-friendly angling stands.
  • Car parks to improve access for anglers (new car parks and upgrades to existing carparks).
  • Walkways to improve access for anglers.
  • Stands, styles, footbridges and boat slips.
  • Accessible angling boats.

Sean Kyne TD, Minister of State with responsibility for the inland fisheries sector, said: “Accessibility for people of all abilities is a priority if our inland fisheries are to be enjoyed by everyone.

“I welcome the investment which will open angling activity to a wider range of participants and I would encourage the community based groups to apply for funding.”

The funding scheme forms part of IFI’s National Strategy for Angling Development which aims to ensure that Ireland’s fish stocks and angling infrastructure are protected and enhanced for the economic value and recreational benefit which they offer to communities across Ireland.

The fisheries resource is worth €836 million to the Irish economy annually and supports upwards of 11,000 jobs, often in rural and peripheral communities.

IFI head of business development Suzanne Campion added: “We are now inviting applications for funding for ‘shovel-ready’ projects which will improve access to angling.

“This is a vital step in developing facilities for the 273,600 anglers currently in Ireland and the 163,000 international visitors who fished here in 2015. By improving access, we can help grow domestic participation in angling and encourage more visitors to our country every year.”

Campion said the National Strategy for Angling Development “aims to grow the annual economic contribution of angling by €96 million over the next five years, creating an additional 1,800 jobs and attracting 40,000 more tourists annually.

“We are calling on angling development groups to apply for funding through this scheme. Together, we can ensure our angling infrastructure is developed and we can help remove any barriers to participating in this valuable activity.”

Applications for funding should be submitted via the online application form.

Applications will be evaluated in light of the objectives of IFI’s National Strategy for Angling Development, which aims to make angling accessible and attractive through information, infrastructure and support, to develop tourism through the promotion of angling and to establish recognition of angling as an important leisure and recreational pursuit. The closing date for applications is Tuesday 8 November.

IFI said it expects to continue funding in this area in 2017, and invites expressions of interest (open till the end of November 2016) from those wishing to develop more complex projects to deliver on the National Strategy for Angling Development.

Published in Angling

#Angling - Judge Marie Keane has convicted Belfast man John Beales of illegal fishing and obstruction of fisheries officers over an incident on the Clare River in Claregalway on 13 July 2015.

Beales was convicted for failure to attach a gill tag to a wild salmon under Section 3 of the Wild Salmon and Sea Trout Tagging Scheme Regulations and for obstruction under Section 301(7) of the Fisheries (Consolidation) Act, 1959.

Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) officers Conor Dennedy and Paul Reynolds attended court and gave evidence of events to Judge Keane at a sitting of Galway District Court on the 30th of September.

Officer Dennedy told how they were on a foot patrol on the Clare River on the date in question he saw an angler, later identified as Beales, fishing downstream of the bridge. When Beales noticed the fisheries officer, he concealed his fishing equipment and walked towards him.

Beales denied he had been fishing when questioned by Officer Dennedy. However, upon inspection of Beales’ van, Officer Dennedy found two salmon, one trout and two mounted fishing rods. One of the salmon had a tag for the Foyle Fisheries Area issued to Beales affixed to it, which is only valid in the Foyle area.

Beales became aggressive when questioned by fisheries officers and was later directed to leave the area by gardaí under the Public Order Act.

Initially, IFI issued Beales with a fixed charge penalty notice for the offence, but despite reminders, he did not pay. As a result, Beales was prosecuted and brought to court.

Judge Keane accepted the evidence of the fisheries officers in court and imposed fines totalling €900, as well as costs of €500. She also made a Forfeiture Order in respect of all items seized on the day from Beales.

Published in Angling

#Angling - Whitechurch Youth Group from Rathfarnham in Dublin has once again taken up angling as part of Inland Fisheries Ireland’s Dublin Angling Initiative (DAI).

The youth group recently embarked on lessons in the basics of fly fishing, one of the most popular forms of angling.

Students picked up the basics of fly fishing equipment, fly tying and fly casting very quickly. And after a couple of lessons on dry land in Whitechurch, they were ready to go to the river bank and put their skills into practice at a popular angling spot in Milltown.

That’s where Matthew McDonald caught a wild brown trout assisted by his friend Nicky O’Hagan on their first fishing trip with the DAI.

Whitechurch Youth Group previously ran a fly-tying programme for fly fishing during the Winter months for several years. After a two year break from fly-tying, they have decided to re-introduce it to the youth group’s programme over the next few months.

IFI’s initiative offers young people from national and secondary schools, summer projects and youth services the opportunity to attend fishing courses throughout the summer.

Among them are young people from the Sphere 17 youth group in Darndale, North Dublin, who took part in a nighttime fishing event in Maynooth recently.

To date, thousands of young people have been introduced to sea, coarse and game angling and the initiative has been a catalyst in setting up fishing clubs for young people throughout the country.

“We have partnered with Whitechurch Youth Group for many years in showing young people what fishing is all about,” said DAI co-ordinator Oisin Cahill. “Fly Fishing is a particularly enjoyable type of fishing and it was great to see how quickly the youth group members picked up the art of fly tying and casting.

“Fishing is a hobby which can be enjoyed at any age. It is fantastic to see so many young people take up angling through the Dublin Angling Initiative.

“We would encourage anyone interested to try it out and discover a pastime which will have a positive impact on your health and wellbeing as well as being good fun.”

For further information on the DAI, visit www.fisheriesireland.ie or contact Oisin Cahill at [email protected]

Published in Angling

#Angling - Inland Fisheries Ireland’s Dublin Angling Initiative (DAI) recently hosted its first nighttime fishing event at Meadow View Fisheries in Maynooth, Co Kildare.

A group of young people from Sphere 17 youth group in Darndale attended the event and fished for six hours from 7pm until 2am, enjoying good catches of roach, rudd and perch.

Nighttime angling equipment and techniques were introduced to the young people, who took little time to master the pursuit. During the event, the DAI also provided a barbecue to feed the hungry anglers.

The DAI aims to promote, develop and improve angling in the greater Dublin area. During the summer months, young people from national and secondary schools, summer projects and youth services are taken out on fishing courses.

To date, thousands of young people have been introduced to sea, coarse and game angling and the initiative has been a catalyst in setting up fishing clubs for many of these young people.

Oisin Cahill, DAI co-coordinator at Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI), said: “Night fishing is an entirely different type of fishing, which the group from Sphere 17 had not experienced previously.

"We were delighted to show them the techniques required and provide them with the right equipment to enable them to try it out.

"Feedback on the night was very positive and another such event is already being planned."

The DAI welcomes enquiries from all groups or individuals interested in its programmes and services. For further information, visit www.fisheriesireland.ie or contact Oisin Cahill at [email protected]

Published in Angling

#FishFarm - Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) has announced an extension of its public consultation on freshwater trout production.

Intended to facilitate the fullest possible consideration by the Board of IFI of stakeholders' views, the consultation period originally due to close on 19 August has now been extended to 19 September.

Stakeholders are encouraged to make a submission through the consultation process, the findings of which will be comprehensively reviewed and considered by IFI, with a report made to Minister of State Seán Kyne’s department, before any further steps are taken. There will be no disruption to the supply of fish during this process.

Information on the consultation is available on the IFI website or from any IFI office. Submissions should be made in writing on or before 5pm on Monday 19 September to [email protected] or by post to Fish Farm Consultation, Inland Fisheries Ireland, 3044 Lake Drive, Citywest Business Campus, Dublin D24 Y265.

Published in Fishing

#FermoyWeir - Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) is consulting with Cork County Council regarding emergency works required at Fermoy Weir.

Low water levels, damage to the weir cap below the bridge and a strong run of salmon on the Munster Blackwater have resulted in large numbers of migrating fish becoming trapped below the weir.

IFI protection officers are closely monitoring the situation to minimise the risk to migrating fish. It's anticipated that the council will begin work to create a natural channel to direct fish towards the fish ladder.

IFI will advise stakeholders on the Munster Blackwater once the scope of works and timeframe is agreed.

Published in Inland Waterways

#FishKill - Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) has successfully prosecuted Irish Water over a chemical discharge on 18 August last year that causing a significant fish kill on a tributary of the Tullamore River.

At a sitting of Portlaoise District Court on Friday 15 July, Judge Catherine Staines heard evidence from Michael Fitzsimons, a senior fisheries environmental officer with IFI, that following a pollution report received from Irish Water, IFI carried out a detailed investigation on the Clodiagh River.

Over 3,000 fish mortalities were estimated over a 4km stretch of the river, consisting predominantly of trout along with other species such as salmon, lamprey, minnow and stoneloach.

The fish kill was as a direct result of a chemical discharge from an accident at the Irish Water plant in Clonsalee, Co Laois. Irish Water entered a guilty plea.

Judge Staines directed Irish Water to pay IFI’s legal costs of €5,016 and to cover the full cost of the rehabilitation works to be carried out downstream of the incident area. A development plan will be formulated by IFI in the coming weeks.

The judge did not impose a fine on the basis that it would be the Irish taxpayer paying for the incident. She also instructed Irish Water to carry out a full review of its Waste Water Treatment Plants (WWTP) and provide a report to her by 21st July 2017.

Judge Staines stated that she did not want to see an incident like this happening again.

“This was a serious pollution incident which will take a considerable number of years for the river to recover," said Amanda Mooney, Shannon River Basin District director with IFI.

"I am pleased with the outcome of the case and the provision for vital rehabilitation works to assist fish stocks to recover naturally.”

Judge Staines adjourned the case until 21 July 2017 to allow sufficient time for the rehabilitation works and WWTP review report to be concluded.

In other news, submissions are open for the consultation on plans to phase out fish farming at three of four IFI facilities it currently operates around Ireland.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, operations in Roscrea, Co Tipperary; Cullion in Mullingar, Co Westmeath and Lough Allua in West Cork are affected by the restructuring plan.

Facilities at Cong in Co Mayo will be retained or research and stocking purposes, but rainbow and brown trout will no longer be farmed for sale.

Submissions should be made in writing before 5pm on Friday 19 August to [email protected] or Fish Farm Consultation, IFI, 3044 Lake Drive, Citywest Business Campus, Dublin D24 Y265.

Published in Angling

#Angling - Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) is seeking submissions from interested parties in relation to proposals to introduce two bye-laws on the Clare River system, and a bye-law defining the upstream and downstream boundaries of the Cong Canal/River – both in the Western River Basin District.

The proposals currently under consideration for the Clare River sysrem are to request the minister to introduce two bye-laws as follows:

  • Revoke bye-law 841 of 2008 to permit all legal angling methods on the Clare River from Daly’s Bridge in the townland of Corrandrum to a point 300m upstream of the footbridge at Anbally in the townlands of Anbally and Turloughmartin, Co Galway. This section of river is currently fly-only and the proposed bye-law will bring it into line with the rest of the Clare River.
  • Extend the closed season for all angling on the Abbert and Grange Rivers by two months to cover the period 1 September to 31 March annually. This bye-law is being proposed as a conservation measure having regard to the very significant contribution of both of these rivers to wild brown trout stocks in the Clare River system and Lough Corrib.

Meanwhile, the proposal under consideration for the Cong Canal/River is to request a bye-law that would clearly define the upstream boundary between Lough Mask and the Cong Canal and the downstream boundary between the Cong River and Lough Corrib.

The purpose of the proposed bye-law is to enable the effective enforcement of legislation governing the open angling seasons for trout and salmon on the Cong Canal/River as these differ from the open seasons for these species on Loughs Corrib and Mask.

If considered necessary, IFI may decide to arrange a public consultation meeting on any or all of the proposed bye-laws. All submissions must be received in writing and will be published on the IFI website.

Submissions should be marked 'Public consultation- Clare River system' or 'Public consultation - Cong Canal/River' respectively, and be submitted by email to [email protected] or by post to:

The Director,
Inland Fisheries Ireland,
Teac Breac,
Earl’s Island,
Galway

The public consultation period will run for four weeks and the closing date for receipt of submissions is 5pm on Thursday 11 August 2016.

Published in Angling

#Jobs - Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) is recruiting a Fish Community Modeller on a temporary basis (circa 18 months) to work in its research department based in Citywest with occasional requirement to travel to Queens University Belfast (QUB) as part of the role.

The successful candidate will report to a senior research officer and will be tasked with developing a realistic mathematical model of predator-prey interactions in lake fish communities.

The model will take account of existing knowledge relating to focal species, including population dynamics, life-history strategies, feeding ecology, behaviour and physiology and will be used to evaluate the ecological consequences of fisheries management strategies.

They will also be required to contribute to publication of peer review papers and disseminate results at conferences and stakeholder groups; to add to modelling capacity at IFI and contribute to relevant research activities as appropriate; and to participate in the fisheries modelling group at QUB.

The successful applicant will be expected to:

  • Quickly understand the management context of the project and available data.
  • Design, build in software and test a two-species model of fish population dynamics.
  • Interact productively with staff in the IFI research team and contribute to the fisheries modelling group at QUB.
  • Produce publications and material to support and promote the correct use of the model in fisheries management and policy.
  • Have proven ability to build and test quantitative computation models in software, including coding in at least one third-generation language (C, C++, etc) and a mathematical scripting language (Matlab, R, etc).
  • Perform other duties as may be allocated by the senior research Officer or his/her nominee.
  • Have a Bachelor's degree in a relevant area.
  • Be available from 1 September 2016.
  • Have a full driving licence valid in the State.

The successful candidate will ideally possess:

  • A PhD in a relevant area.
  • Evidence of successful peer review publication.
  • Excellent interpersonal skills with an emphasis on communication of science to diverse stakeholders.

This is a temporary appointment, estimated to be for a period of 18 months. Salary range is on the HEO Salary Scale (as of 1 November 2013), €40,675-€57,405, 11-point scale including 2 LSIs (appointment will be made on the first point of the scale).

Applications for this role should be submitted in the form of a cover letter and CV quoting reference ‘Modeller’ to [email protected] by 5pm on Monday 18 July 2016.

Applications will be shortlisted on the basis of information provided in the cover letter and CV. Late applications will not be accepted. Canvassing will disqualify. Inland Fisheries Ireland is an equal opportunities employer.

Published in Jobs
Page 15 of 27

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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