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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Jellyfish

#Jellyfish - Organisers of tomorrow's Ironman triathlon in Dublin Bay are currently monitoring the appearance of Lion's Mane jellyfish in the waters of the swimming course.

According to The Irish Times, the Ironman event is scheduled to begin early on Sunday 14 August with a 1.9km swim across the bay from Sandycove, which has been red-flagged since Wednesday after a number of the dangerous jellyfish washed up on the beach.

The Lion's Mane's powerful sting is known to cause anaphylactic shock, which is potentially fatal – and the sting is still potent even days after a jellyfish has died, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

Published in Dublin Bay

The potentially dangerous Lions Mane Jellyfish which is being washed up on Irish beaches can cause anaphylactic shock.

So far this summer the jellyfish has washed up on beaches at Portmarnock, Malahide, Sutton and Bettystown.

The Irish water safety CEO, John Leech, says 'more jellyfish are likely to appear on our beaches in the coming weeks'.

'The sting from these jellyfish can cause anaphylactic shock and we have had a number of people hospitalised as a result of a sting from these venomous Jellyfish', Leech adds.

The sting from their tentacles lasts many days after they have died.

Members of the public should report the sightings of these two jellyfish to the relevant local Authority Water Safety Development Officer here

For those  who will be using non-lifeguarded beaches then download information on jellyfish, including a photo ID card and First Aid treatment of stings here 

Published in Marine Warning

#Jellyfish - Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council has raised the red warning flag in Sandycove and erected signs warning swimmers of the presence of stinging jellyfish in the water and washed up on the beach. Photographs have been taken and sent off for expert identification of the marine species.

Published in Water Safety

#Jellyfish - Summer may be long gone, but jellyfish attracted by the warmer waters of recent months are still posing a hazard on Galway's beaches, as the Connacht Tribune reports.

Recent weeks have seen Salthill strewn with the remains of hundreds of dead mauve stingers, which can still pack a punch even after death.

Meanwhile, though marine science boffins are not surprised by the sheer numbers of the seaborne creatures in Galway Bay as this period is their mating season, they are concerned that so many are being washed ashore.

The jellyfish warning comes not long after Fáilte Ireland's falling afoul of locals for advising against bathing at Salthill's popular strand.

While recommending the city suburb's famous promenade for walking and sightseeing, the tourism board's Discover Ireland website reportedly stated that "swimming is not recommended" at the adjacent beachs.

No reasons were given for this advice, which has raised the ire of locals including Labour Party city councillor Niall McNelis, who said: “I cannot understand why Fáilte Ireland would warn people not to swim in Salthill. It has a Blue Flag."

Published in Coastal Notes

#Dublin Bay junior sailors turned up to race yesterday on what was arguably one of the best sailing days of the season so far only to learn the first race of their September Series was scubbed due to 'jellyfish reasons'.

It's just the latest shut down of leisure pursuits in the capitals waters after Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council warned against bathing in 'Jelly fish infested waters' at nearby Sandycove.

As a finale to the 2014 season, racing was scheduled for six dinghy classes including the Optimist, Laser Radial and 4.7, Topper, Feva and 420 classes but not even the fact that over 100 junior sailors drawn from the four dun Laoghaire yacht clubs would be on the water rather than in it could stop yesterday's cancellation of the harbour races, such is the risk posed by the Lions mane jellyfish.

Last week Dun Laoghaire Harbour Master Simon Coate wrote to the yacht clubs and classes. ' A considerable number of Lions mane jellyfish have been sighted within the harbour. Please warn your members,' Captain Coate advised.

Published in Youth Sailing

#Jellyfish - The Irish Mirror reported on Friday that 17 dangerous lion's mane jellyfish were removed from Sandycove Beach on south Dublin Bay.

However, that may be just the tip of the iceberg in their numbers as the giant venomous species flocks to Ireland's warming coastal waters from elsewhere in the Irish Sea.

Meanwhile, restrictions on bathing have been lifted from nearby Sandycove Harbour and Killiney Beach after elevated bacterial levels were detected in the water earlier in the week.

Dollymount Strand's temporary bathing ban has also been lifted, as have a number of advisories in North Co Dublin.

However, precautionary notices remain at three locations – Burrow in Sutton, Claremont in Howth and Loughshinny Beach between Rush and Skerries – due to poor results of samples collected from outfalls at those locations.

Published in Coastal Notes

#Jellyfish - West Cork on Thursday (7 August) saw a young girl treated for a severe allergic reaction to a jellyfish sting, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

The Irish Examiner has more on the story of the girl aged between 10 and 12 who's believed to have come in contact with a Portuguese man o'war or similar stinging sea creature at Goleen beach.

Within minutes of the incident the girl was vomiting, spasming and suffering severe difficulty with breathing in what Goleen Coast Guard officer-in-charge Michael O'Regan called a "vicious reaction".

"After 50 years, I thought I'd seen everything," he told the Examiner. "I've done about 30 first aid courses over the years but have never come across anything to prepare us for something like this."

Sightings of dangerous jellyfish in Ireland's warming coastal waters since the beginning of last week have prompted warnings from water safety officials.

These warnings have been reiterated since the predicted arrival of the giant lion's mane jellyfish, which has been spotted off Sutton in North Dublin.

Published in Marine Wildlife

#jellyfish – The CEO of Irish Water Safety, John leech is urging the public to use the Local Authority manned lifeguarded bathing places to ensure that they avoid being stung by two of the most venomous jellyfish that visit our waters. The Lions mane Jellyfish has been spotted in Sutton.

The Lifeguards ensure your safety on our beaches and will be patrolling on their surf rescue boards and on the beaches to ensure that they do not pose a threat to members of the public.

The CEO is also alerting the public that due to the high temperatures in our waters, the prevailing westerly winds and the north Atlantic current, these potentially dangerous jellyfish are likely to appear on more of our beaches in the coming weeks. The Portuguese man o 'war jelly fish was reported on Bunmahon and Clonea strand in Waterford last Tuesday.

Earlier today in Barleycove, West Cork, a young girl was rushed to hospital after suffering an apparent allergic reaction to a sting from a Jellyfish.

 

Published in Dublin Bay
Tagged under

#MarineWildlife - As if this week's warnings against swimming at 12 North Co Dublin beaches weren't enough, The Irish Times brings news of sightings of the dreaded Portuguese man o'war among other stinging sea creatures flocking to Ireland's warmer waters.

As reported earlier this week on Afloat.ie, Irish Water Safety chief John Leech gave warning of sightings at Bunmahon and Clonea strand in Waterford of the dangerous jellyfish-like species, last seen here in big numbers in September 2012.

But the warm currents flowing towards Irish shores are also likely to bring the lion's mane jellyfish, which packs a sting to match its large size - often 2 metres in diameter.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Marine Wildlife

#Jellyfish - A giant jellyfish found beached on Dorset's south coast in recent days could be a harbinger of a future invasion of British and Irish waters.

ITV News reports on the metre-wide barrel jellyfish, also appropriately known as the dustbin-lid jellyfish, which was found by a dog-walker on Portland beach.

Despite its fearsome size, the UK's Marine Conservation Society says the Atlantic-native species is harmless to humans.

But warming waters off the UK and Ireland's southern coasts this summer could see them turn out in huge numbers, thriving in a climate that threatens our native marine species, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

Published in Marine Wildlife
Tagged under
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020

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