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2022 was a special year for Kinsale Yacht Club’s St. Stephens Day race for the Gunsmoke Bell Trophy. This year marked thirty years of race sponsorship by long-standing club member Sammy Cohen.

For the nine boats that took part this year, they were lucky enough to sail in perfect sailing conditions for this time of year with blue skies and a steady southwesterly breeze which died at the end, leading some boats to struggle to get to the finish line.

The Race Officer, Denis Kieran, laid a course outside the harbour, and Tom Roche’s Meridian led the fleet out of the harbour and around the course.

Stephen Lysaght, skipper of Reavra Too accepts the  Gunsmoke Trophy from Sammy CohenStephen Lysaght, skipper of Reavra Too, accepts the  Gunsmoke Trophy from Sammy Cohen

As the wind died close to the finish off the marina in Kinsale, three boats (Meridian, Reavra Too and Chancer) battled it out for line honours, with all three being just over a minute apart.

In the end, it was Stephen Lysaght’s Reavra Too that won the trophy on Echo, with Chancer in second place and Meridian in third place.

Published in Kinsale
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Maeve Cotter will act as the regatta director for Kinsale's staging of the Dragon Gold Cup in 2024.

Cotter is a former Commodore of Glandore Harbour Yacht Club and the current Rear Commodore of Kinsale YC. She takes up the role with an experienced committee acting alongside her.

The event will run from 6th to 13th of September 2024.

Matthias Hellstern, Commodore of Kinsale Yacht Club, welcomed Maeve commenting, “I have worked with Maeve on a Management Committee level for over 4 years, and I have seen first-hand her ability and dedication that I have no doubt she will apply to this role. As an experienced Dragon sailor, Maeve also understands the class and what is required to make this an exceptional event.”

Kinsale Yacht Club is a long way into its planning of the 2024 event with Astra Construction already on board as the headline sponsor. The Gold Cup is the pinnacle event of the dragon season, and excitement is already mounting in Kinsale following the disappointment of having to the cancel the event in 2020 due to covid.

Dragon racing at Kinsale Yacht Club Photo: Bob BatemanDragon racing at Kinsale Yacht Club Photo: Bob Bateman

Asked for her thoughts on the role and regatta, Maeve added “I have sailed Dragons since I was a teenager and love the boat and class. My brother Michael campaigned Dragons for many years and my two sons, Daniel and Sean will be racing in the event on our boat “Whisper” so no doubt I will have plenty of suggestions and feedback! We are lucky that Kinsale is such a destination town, with the yacht club located in the heart of it, coupled with the phenomenal race area at the beginning of the wild Atlantic way. It’s really exciting for the Irish class to have such a big event to look forward to ”.

Published in Dragon
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In the time-honoured tradition at Kinsale in West Cork, the end of the season at Kinsale Yacht Club is marked by the Laying Up Dinner. This event allows members to come together to celebrate the season passed and look forward to the upcoming season. This year broke all records with tickets selling out in under three hours, such was the demand from members to attend.

2022 was a very successful year for Kinsale YC, including the inaugural Inishtearaght Race, three boats competing in the Round Ireland Race, two new National Champions this year, and the extremely successful Under 25’s Kinsailor J/24.

The Kinsale initiative is reviewed by Afloat's WM Nixon in an article entitled; Kinsale’s Pace-Setting In Nurturing Ireland’s Young Sailing Talent

Kinsale Yacht Club's inaugural Inishtearaght Race in May Photo: Bob BatemanKinsale Yacht Club's inaugural Inishtearaght Race in May Photo: Bob Bateman

Squib Champions

Ian Travers was the Regatta Director for the Squib National Championships, and the event saw 55 Squibs from across the UK and Ireland competing in Kinsale. Ian, along with Keith O Riordan took the Squib Irish National Champion title and now joins Kinsale’s list of National Champions.

Irish Squib National Champion Keith O Riordan (left) and Ian Travers of Kinsale Yacht Club Photo: Bob BatemanIrish Squib National Champion Keith O Riordan (left) and Ian Travers of Kinsale Yacht Club Photo: Bob Bateman

Irish Squib National Champion Ian Travers and KYC Commodore Matthias HellsternIrish Squib National Champion Ian Travers (left) and KYC Commodore Matthias Hellstern

Dragon Champions

Former Commodore Cameron Good, along with current Commodore Matthias Hellstern and Henry Kingston took the title of Dragon National Champion at the event in Dun Laoghaire, which had eluded Kinsale YC for 32 years.

Cameron Good, along with current Commodore Matthias Hellstern and Henry Kingston on their way to Dragon class victory at Dun Laoghaire Photo: Afloat.ieCameron Good, along with current Commodore Matthias Hellstern and Henry Kingston on their way to Dragon class victory at Dun Laoghaire Photo: Afloat.ie

Irish Dragon National Champions Cameron Good, Henry Kingston and Matthias Hellstern with KYC Vice Commodore, Tony ScannellIrish Dragon National Champions Cameron Good, Henry Kingston and Matthias Hellstern with KYC Vice Commodore, Tony Scannell

Under 25’s Kinsailor project

The Kinsailor Under 25 crew from Kinsale Yacht Club had a fantastic year afloat Photo: Bob BatemanThe Kinsailor Under 25 crew from Kinsale Yacht Club had a fantastic year afloat Photo: Bob Bateman

The Club Member of the Year was awarded to former Commodore, Dave O’Sullivan. This award is made annually to someone who has gone to exceptional lengths to further the goals of Kinsale YC. This year’s recipient was given a suggestion which he ran with, putting a lot of time and effort into it. He used his power of persuasion to get others involved and very quickly Dave O’Sullivan had the Under 25’s Kinsailor project up and running and he agreed to be the mentor for the developing team.

Kinsale Yacht Club's Dave O’Sullivan - the under 25’s Kinsailor project up mentor Kinsale Yacht Club's Dave O’Sullivan - the under 25’s Kinsailor project mentor Photo: Bob Bateman

With an enthusiastic youthful squad, many of whom attended the Laying Up Dinner, Dave set up a training schedule and fundraising events to be carried out by the squad who he said had to take ownership of the project.

A squad of 14 was put together and training began.

The Kinsailors competing at the J24 European Championships in Howth in late August where they took third overall Photo: Christopher HowellThe Kinsailors competing at the J24 European Championships in Howth in late August where they took third overall Photo: Christopher Howell

The boat and crew performed well enough in the midweek series but it really took everyone’s attention at the J24 European Championships in Howth in late August. Despite technical difficulties with a broken mast, the boat finished overall third in Europe separated from first by a single point and the best-performing Irish boat. They certainly left their mark, and hopefully, this was the first successful year of many to come.

Published in Kinsale
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David Riome’s Valfeya won Saturday’s third race of the McCarthy Insurance October/November White Sails League at Kinsale Yacht Club in Fleet 1, both IRC and ECHO from John Stallard’s Siboney.

Overall, Valfreya is on six points in IRC, one ahead of Siboney on seven. Michael Carroll’s Chancer is third on nine. 

In ECHO handicap, the same trio tops the league - Valfreya on 5 points, Siboney 8 and Chancer 12.

Fleet 2 IRC leader is Patrick Beckett’s Miss Charlie on 5 points from Sallybelle (Albert O’Neill) 6, with Dominic Falvey’s Swift on 10.

In ECHO, Sallybelle (6 points) leads from Swift and Miss Charlie who are both on 10.

Published in Kinsale

Kinsale skipper Conor Doyle is lying third in class four after the first 24 hours of the Rolex Middle Sea Race

The Irish XP-50 Freya from Kinsale Yacht Club was 30 minutes behind the Podesta family’s Maltese First 45 Elusive 2 through the Strait of Messina and is ranked third in class.

On board Freya – the sole Irish boat in the race – is a high-powered crew that includes Kelvin Harrap, Rory Harrap, Will Byrne, Barry Hurley, Nick Jones, Malcolm McCormick, Cian Guilfoyle, James Lyons, Conor Doyle and Nin O'Leary.

The Ireland Freya crew skippered by Conor Doyle from Kinsale ready for the start of the 2022 Middle Sea Race this morning in Valetta harbour includes Kelvin Harrap, Rory Harrap, Will Byrne, Barry Hurley, Nick Jones, Malcolm McCormick, Cian Guilfoyle, James Lyons, Conor Doyle and Nin O'LearyThe Ireland Freya crew skippered by Conor Doyle from Kinsale ready for the start of the 2022 Middle Sea Race this morning in Valetta harbour includes Kelvin Harrap, Rory Harrap, Will Byrne, Barry Hurley, Nick Jones, Malcolm McCormick, Cian Guilfoyle, James Lyons, Conor Doyle and Nin O'Leary

This time last year, the race reporting was struggling to keep up with the pace of the frontrunners. The Maxi Multihulls had scorched 450 nautical miles of the 606nm course. What a difference a year makes: same or similar boats, polar opposite conditions. The story so far of the 43rd Rolex Middle Sea Race is one of determination and true grit, grinding out the miles one by one, sometimes taking more than hour to do so. Accepting pats on the back and slaps on the face from the wind is par for this edition. The fleet is currently spread between the Aeolian Islands north of Sicily, 220nm along the track, back to just north of Syracuse, a mere 83nm into the race. If it makes for hard watching from the shore, imagine life onboard.

The MOD 70s Zoulou skippered by Erik MARIS and to leeward Snowflake skippered by Frank Slootman in the Rolex Middle Sea Race Photo: Kurt ArrigoThe MOD 70s Zoulou skippered by Erik MARIS and to leeward Snowflake skippered by Frank Slootman in the Rolex Middle Sea Race Photo: Kurt Arrigo

Currently, the MOD70 Mana, just north of Filicudi, is doing just over 7 knots, 2nm ahead of Maserati Multi70. Meanwhile, Zoulou, another MOD70, looks to have dived south towards Snowflake, perhaps to stay in or find better pressure. All four are well north of the rhumb line. The leading monohulls are right among them. The monohull maxi Bullitt, sailing parallel with Maserati at a similar speed, leads the larger Leopard 3 by about 3.5nm. According to the tracker, the French Ker 46 Daguet 3 – Corum – at Stromboli - is leading overall in the battle for the Rolex Middle Sea Race Trophy under IRC time correction, but this is really just an indication with so much of the race still to run.

Yesterday’s start from Grand Harbour was a foretaste of the 24 hours that would follow. The wind continually dropped in and out. Some boats were able to make fast progress out through the breakwater into open water. For others it was more miss than hit. The 55nm passage north to Capo Passero, on the southeast corner of Sicily, followed a similar pattern among all classes: head northeast out of the harbour for about 20nm before choosing the right moment to turn north to Sicily. Boat speeds went up and down with the wind strength until about halfway across the channel when the five racing trimarans took off, posting speeds in excess of 20 knots. The Maxi Monohulls did their best to keep pace hitting mid to high teens (at least according to the tracker). Mid-size boats also profited from this welcome respite from the light airs.

The relief did not last. While the multihulls kept in good breeze all the way to the beginning of the Messina Strait, which they reached around midnight, the wind dropped across the rest of the fleet as the leading monohulls reached Etna. In the darkness spotting what wind there was from signs on the water became nigh impossible. Sailing into traps seems to have been frequent and being the lead boat on the water was not always the best position.

Chocolate 3, for example, had sailed exceptionally off the start and Bouwe Bekking reported in during the early evening: “It’s a beautiful sunset, and up to now we’ve been sailing a very good race. François (Bopp) did a very good job at the start, wiggling ourselves through that, the crew work was good and, right now, Bullitt, one of the biggest in the fleet, is only one and a half miles ahead of us, so we can’t complain.” A few hours later at 0300 CEST, after making solid progress up the eastern seaboard of Sicily in line abreast with her IRC 2 class competitors, the Swiss boat looks to have hit a hole and had reason to complain. The boats further offshore just kept on moving, leaving Chocolate 3 behind. It has taken much of the day to get back on terms, and the crew will shortly be rounding Stromboli in a pack of other IRC 2 yachts.

Life onboard the fastest yachts in the fleet was easier until halfway to Stromboli. Having negotiated the narrow Strait in relatively good shape, exiting at 0130 CEST on Sunday morning, Paul Larsen reported in at dawn on the approach to Stromboli: “It’s oily calm conditions. We are holding on by our fingernails to a very tentative lead on the good ship Mana. The sun is just rising and behind us we can see Zoulou, Maserati and Snowflake. We are trying to hang on to every little gust we can get, as we glide along at 3.5 knots which, believe me, is hard fought for and very much appreciated.”

Christopher Sherlock's Leopard 3, a Farr 100 is competing in ORC: X, IRC: Class 1 in the Rolex Middle Sea Race Photo: Kurt ArrigoChristopher Sherlock's Leopard 3, a Farr 100 is competing in ORC: X, IRC: Class 1 in the Rolex Middle Sea Race Photo: Kurt Arrigo

For a long time, Leopard 3 looked to have the legs on the slightly shorter Bullitt. Their passage up the coast of Sicily was harder than for the multihulls, but easier than for many yachts behind. Reaching the beginning of the 20nm strait at about 0300 CEST, the two did well to get through it in two hours. Then shortly after exiting the Strait of Messina at around 0500 CEST on Sunday morning, Leopard appears to have got into difficulties, coming to a near standstill and losing 5nm to her Italian rival, a gap which has not changed greatly in the intervening hours.

The fight at the front of IRC 3 has been no less intense, with Lee Satariano and Christian Ripard on Maltese yacht Artie eking out a lead over Tonnerre de Glen from France and sistership Ino XXX from the United Kingdom. Just before midnight, off Syracuse, Artie and Tonnerre appeared to get stuck in glue while Ino XXX further offshore kept moving. Artie made better work of the conundrum than Tonnerre, but lost significant ground to Ino XXX. While these two have stretched away from the rest of their class, Artie has not yet been able to claw back lost ground as they approach Stromboli. Ripard and Satariano have done the race enough to know it is not over and if the forecast wind ahead of them is as tricky as it looks, there will be plenty of opportunities.

Yves Grosjean’s French Neo 430,NeoJivaro, also in IRC 3, gave a flavour of the experience so far for most of the crews: “It’s been a long night, we have been done a lot of sail changes… spinnakers, genoas, really everything. There isn’t a single sail we have not tried.”

The night to come does not look any easier, with a light easterly wind forecast for much of the hours of darkness, patchy throughout and diminishing over time. There will be no respite for any of the crews as they work hard to harness every puff and gain any advantage.

DAY 2 CLASS UPDATE 1700 CEST


IRC 1 AT STROMBOLI TRANSIT (12 YACHTS AROUND)
All but two of IRC 1 have passed the northernmost transit. Hungarian entry, Marton Jozsa’s Wild Joe is ahead of Jean Pierre Barjon’s French Botin 65, Spirit Of Lorina, on corrected by only 22 minutes, with Niklas Zennstrom’s CF520 Rán from Sweden a further five minutes back. On the water, Andrea Recordati’s Wally Yacht Bullitt from Italy holds a 3.5nm lead over the Spanish Farr 100 Leopard 3 led by Chris Sherlock, which in turn is 7nm ahead of Wild Joe. All are now sailing west from Stromboli at between seven and eight knots.

IRC 2 AT STROMBOLI TRANSIT (3 YACHTS AROUND)
The German TP52 Red Bandit skippered by Carl-Peter Forster, Eric de Turckheim’s French NMYD 54 Teasing Machine… and Gerard Logel’s French IRC 52 Arobas2 hold the top three spots separated by an hour on corrected time. Meanwhile Hagar V (ITA), Daguet 3 – Corum (FRA), Maverick (AUS) and Chocolate 3 (SUI) are close behind very near to passing the Stromboli transit.

IRC 3 AT MESSINA TRANSIT (5 YACHTS THROUGH)
Only five yachts have made it past the Messina transit. James Neville’s British HH42 Ino XXX holds the lead from Maltese entry Artie, co-skippered by Lee Satariano and Christian Ripard, by 23 minutes. Gilles Caminade’s Ker 40 Chenapan 4 (FRA) is in third, three hours off the current pace. Tonnerre De Glen (FRA) and Mahana (FRA) are the other two through. Ino XXX and Artie are approximately 22 nautical miles from their next transit at Stromboli.

IRC 4 AT MESSINA TRANSIT (3 YACHTS THROUGH)
The leading boats on the water in IRC 4 were registering over nine knots of boats speed on exiting the Strait of Messina, but slowed as they entered the open water north of Sicily. The Podesta family’s Maltese First 45 Elusive 2 has made it through the narrow strait and is ranked in pole position after time correction. Philippe Frantz’s French NMD 43 Albator was the first in class to exit the Strait of Messina and is ranked second. Conor Doyle’s Irish XP-50 Freya from Kinsale YC, was 30 minutes behind Elusive 2 through the Strait and is ranked third in class.

IRC 5 AT MESSINA TRANSIT (1 YACHT THROUGH)
Gianrocco Catalano’s Italian First 40 Tevere Remo Mon Ile is the first boat in the class to exit the Strait of Messina and is likely leading by a substantial margin after IRC time correction. According to the tracker, second in class and on the water is Ed Bell’s British JPK 1180 Dawn Treader. Johnathan Gambin’s Maltese Dufour 44 Ton Laferla lies in third in class. A special mention for Beppe Bisotto’s Fast 42 Atame racing two-handed with Catherine Jordan, which is currently fourth in class.

IRC 6
It has been slow going in IRC 6 with most of the fleet due east of Etna having raced less than 100 miles in the first 24 hours. However, a leading pack of four boats has made a significant gain after finding good breeze at around midday. Massimo Juris’ Italian JPK 1080 Colombre leads the class on the water, about 10 nm from the exit to the strait. Maltese J/99 Calypso, skippered by Seb Ripard, is about two nm behind Colombre, but according to the tracker is ranked first by about an hour after IRC time correction. The double-handers Ludovic Gérard’s French JPK 1080 Solenn for Pure Ocean and the American Sun Fast 3300 Red Ruby, raced by McKee and Strum-Palerm, are in a close-fought duel. Solenn is just ahead on the water, but appears behind Red Ruby after time correction.

See live tracker below

Published in Middle Sea Race

Kinsale Yacht Club has reminded members to submit their entries for the ‘Boat Log of the Year’ award. The closing date is Friday, October 28

Published in Kinsale
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Two races have been sailed in the McCarthy Insurance October White Sails League at Kinsale Yacht Club, with close competition in both IRC and ECHO handicaps.

Michael Carroll’s Chancer leads Class 1 IRC on four points. John Stallard’s Siboney and David Riome’s Valfreya are next on five points each. Five yachts are racing under IRC.

Under the ECHO handicap, Valfreya and Chancer are tied at the top on four points each, with Siboney third on six. Seven boats are racing ECHO handicap.

In Class 2 IRC, Patrick Beckett’s Miss Charlie maintains a lead of two points at the top, on a total of three, from Albert O’Neill’s Sallybelle, which is second on five.  Third is Dominic Falvey’s Swift on seven points.

Sallybelle leads under ECHO, on five points, from Dermot Lanigan’s Privateer and Miss Charlie, which are tied on seven. Eight yachts are entered in ECHO Class 2, four racing under IRC.

Published in Kinsale
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Kinsale Yacht Club began its October/November White Sails League on Saturday with John Stallard's Siboney winning Class 1 IRC, Michael McCarthy’s Chancer in second place and David Rione’s Valfreya third.

Class 2 winner was Patrick Beckett’s Miss Charlie; second Sallybelle (Albert O’Neill), third Chameleon (Padraig O’Donovan).

In ECHO 1, Siboney also leads. Privateer (Dermot Lanigan) leads ECHO 2.

Published in Kinsale
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Micheal O Suilleabhain may well be the name that goes into the records books.

But he will be the first to point out that not only was it a team effort, in fact, it was an entire Kinsale Yacht Club effort to start putting together an exemplary challenge – initially in times of pandemic and post-pandemic - for the J/24 Europeans 2022 at Howth, when the event itself was still a distant speck on the uncertain future horizon. But a widely-supported campaign on the ICRA K25 model was launched and maintained, gradually building momentum until they reached the big one itself.

There, many proven international stars were so busy keeping tabs on their familiar rivals that the rapidly-improving young Kinsale crew went into the final race with a fighting chance, and they emerged firmly in the podium frame, clearly also the best-placed Irish boat.

Published in Sailor of the Month
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Michael Carroll’s Chancer won Kinsale Yacht Club’s ECHO Cruisers Spinnaker Fleet Race in the 'At Home' Regatta on Sunday.

Second was Samuel Cohen’s Gunsmoke II, and third Stephen Lysaght’s Reavra Too. Albert O’Neil’s Sallybelle won Whitesails ECHO with Anthony Scannell’s Hansemer second and Patrick Beckett’s Miss Charlie third.

Mixed Dinghies winners were Sarah Thuillier and Lucy Foster. Second Phelim Hanley and Matthew Keane, third Ollie Lyons & Will Burges.

The Topper fleet was won by Matt Mapplebeck. Second Emma Fitzgerald. Third, Charlotte Collins. The Optimist Class winner was Annabelle Wilson. Second, Oscar Dillon. Third, Ollie Cronin.

The event was sponsored by Victoria's Antiques.

Published in Kinsale
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020

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