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Displaying items by tag: LE Samuel Beckett

Cork Dockyard's latest client is the Irish Naval Service's OPV90 /P60 series LÉ Samuel Beckett (P61) which berthed in the graving dock previously occupied by another Irish flagged ship, the general cargo containership Huelin Dispatch, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The facility (were ship's were built) in Cork Harbour, is these days part of the Doyle Shipping Group (DSG) and where leadship of the series also known as the 'Beckett/ Playwright' class is undergoing work. According to the INS this planned maintenance is for below the waterline.

It is an extremely busy time for the entire ship’s crew (44 incl. 6 Officers), as the process of dry-docking the Offshore Patrol Vessel of 90m in length, offers a rare opportunity to conduct work on the hull where otherwise underwater fittings and fixtures are usually inaccessible.

LÉ Samuel Beckett was one of several in the naval fleet that was often in the news headlines of recent years haven taken part in humanitarain missions in the Mediterranean Sea. This involved rescuing thousands of migrants/ refugees under dire circumstances when in unseaworthy craft deployed by people-smugglers off north Africa.

At the same time these deployments also proved to be challenging for the crew.

Such experiences have also helped those personnel in the Naval Service to assist in the recent Covid-19 testing centres that have since been stood down in Dublin Port and Galway Harbour.

In fact the leadship LÉ Samuel Beckett also became the first of the fleet to fight against Covid-19 as part of Óglaigh na hÉireann’s efforts to generate additional capacity for the HSE. This first took place from mid-March when berthed in the Irish capital.

Published in Navy

Naval Service vessel the LÉ Samuel Beckett arrived in Dublin this morning (Sunday 15 March) as part of Óglaigh na hÉireann’s efforts to generate more capacity to help the HSE during the current Covid-19 response.

The Irish Defence Forces said: “P61’s facilities, resources and crew will be ready when requested by primary response agencies to fight Covid-19.”

The latest guidelines for the public are available on the HSE website HERE.

The Naval Service denies any personnel on the LÉ Samuel Beckett were put in danger by the poor state of equipment used to raise and lower RIBs into the water, as The Irish Times reports.

The statement followed an inspection of the vessel — commissioned in 2014 — by the manufacturer of the davits it uses to winch smaller craft, which was conducted shortly after its return from its deployment in the Mediterranean last summer.

The inspection report, released to MEP Clare Daly, found that the davits were “in a far worst state of repair than initially expected” with signs of heavy corrosion, and “showed little or no sign of maintenance”. The Naval Service denied this was the case and said all issues have since been corrected.

The offshore patrol vessel’s davits have been used extensively in the rescue of migrants in the Mediterranean, where it has been deployed a number of times since 2015.

The Irish Times has much more on the story HERE.

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Naval Service patrol ship LÉ Samuel Beckett (which this week detained a Portuguese fishing vessel) will be open for public tours when it is docked in the Port of Galway tomorrow, Sunday 25 August. 

According to GalwayDaily, Naval Service crew will be taking members of the public on guided tours tomorrow from 10:00-12:00 in addition 14:00-17:00.

The LÉ Samuel Beckett is one of four new patrol vessels build for the Irish Naval Service in the past five years.

The Samuel Beckett the first to roll off the line in 2014, followed by the LÉ James Joyce in 2015, and the LÉ William Butler Yeats in 2016 and LÉ George Bernard Shaw last year.

For more including a photo of the detained Portuguese registered vessel for alleged breach of fishing regulations click here

Published in Galway Harbour

#navy - The Irish Naval Service offshore patrol vessel, LÉ Samuel Beckett, will be offering guided tours to the public in the Port of Galway today, Saturday, 12th January. 

The Samuel Beckett writes Galway Daily is currently docked in Galway after it detained a fishing boat for breach of regulations off the west coast yesterday.

The first fishing vessel detained by the naval service this year, it was handed over to Galway gardaí this morning.

While it’s around, the LÉ Samuel Beckett will be open for public tours while alongside this afternoon between 14:00-16:00.

To read more on the leadship of the P60 OPV90 class and sisters, click here

Published in Navy

#MarineWildlife - Naval Service personnel on patrol with the LÉ Samuel Beckett encountered the carcass of a large whale some 50 nautical miles south-east of Ballycotton Lighthouse in the days after Christmas.

The “mystery whale” is neither a sighting (which only counts or living cetaceans) nor a stranding. But as the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG) says, the encounter “serves to remind us that the animals that wash up on our shoreline may represent only a small percentage of the total number of cetaceans that expire at sea of presumably natural causes.”

IWDG sightings officer Pádraig Whooley said the location of these whale remains was “interesting as this area of the Celtic Sea has produced the most consistent large-whale sightings in recent months, with fairly regular sightings of fin whales from land-based sites between Ram Head, Ardmore extending east towards the Hook Head lighthouse.”

Published in Marine Wildlife

#NavalService - Naval Service crew from offshore patrol vessel (OPV) LÉ Samuel Beckett arrived home to a heroes welcome today after three months in the Mediterranean on humanitarian rescue operations.

The vessel writes Independent.ie is under the command of Lt Cmdr Eoin Smyth, was cheered to the echo as it rounded Roche's Point in Cork harbour and berthed at Haulbowline Naval base.

Lining the quayside were the families of the 54 crew members - including dozens of children who had missed their enlisted parents since the deployment last May.

LÉ Samuel Beckett was the second Irish patrol ship to deploy to the Mediterranean this year as part of Ireland's commitment to Operation Sofia, the European mission to help migrants attempting to cross from north Africa to the EU.

The OPV has been replaced on station as Afloat previously reported in the Mediterranean by LÉ James Joyce.

For further reading on the return of LÉ Samuel Beckett, click here. 

Published in Navy

#Navy - Crew members of L.É. Samuel Beckett in Malta last weekend were presented with their Operation Sophia medals from the Irish Naval Service, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Flag Officer Commanding Naval Service (FOCNS) Commodore Michael Malone visited Valletta Harbour last weekend to present the medals to the crew who since April have been deployed in the Mediterranean. 

Since the fallout from Libya's boat people trafficking in 2015, the EU launched as a military operation the European Union Naval Force Mediterranean (EUNAVFOR Med) also known as Operation Sophia. The name of the operation was inspired from Sophia, a baby born on board a German Navy frigate whose mother, a Somali refugee was rescued initially by the UK'S Royal Navy.

The 2014 commissioned OPV90 leadship L.É. Samuel Beckett is the second Irish Naval Service patrol ship to take part in Operation Sophia which began last October. On that occasion, OPV80 'Roisin' class LÉ Niamh made history as this was the first time that Ireland joined the EU naval operation tasked against smugglers and traffickers.

Unlike previous other humanitarian missions focusing on Search And Rescue (SAR) of refugees, Operation Sophia among its remit addresses some of the root causes of human-trafficking and migration crisis.

The deployment of LÉ Niamh for Operation Sophia ended late last year. Taking over duties in April this year saw L.É. Samuel Beckett join the EU naval fleet task force comprising of 10 participating member-states.

Following the FOCNS overseas visit to Malta, Commodore Michael Malone conducted another ceremony held in the Naval Base on Haulbowline Island, lower Cork Harbour. This involved an  annual inspection of L.É. James Joyce. The second OPV90 class commissioned into service in September 2015 was followed by L.É. William Butler Yeats in October 2016.

 

Published in Navy

#Navy - Leadship of the Irish Naval Service OPV90 class, LÉ Samuel Beckett is departing today for the Mediterranean to take part in 'Operation Sophia'.

As The Irish Examiner reports, Ireland first joined the EU naval operation against smugglers and traffickers last October when another Offshore Patrol Vessel, the OPV80 class LÉ Niamh was deployed for a three-month mission.

Minister with Responsibility for Defence Paul Kehoe says the crew will be helping to address some of the root causes of migration and human trafficking.

For more click this link. 

Published in Navy

#Navy - A visitor to Waterford City today (Saturday, 24 March) is the leadship of the OPV90 class LÉ Samuel Beckett which is open to the public this afternoon between 2pm and 4pm..

The 'Samuel Beckett' class offshore patrol vessel is the first of a trio of sisters in the Irish Naval Service. The OPV is berthed at Frank Cassin Wharf (north side) of the River Suir. 

In addition to the naval crew the Waterford Unit Naval Service Reserve (WUNSR) will be on board in providing information to potential NSR recruits. This is advance of NSR Recruitment Campaign beginning in April and running until June.

The OPV has carried out humanitarian missions in the Mediterranean in recent years under 'Operation Sophia' This involved search and rescue (SAR) operations which led to saving more than 1,000 migrants.

LÉ Samuel Beckett was built by Babcock Marine & Technology, Appledore, north Devon and was commissioned in 2014. The leadship forms part of modernisation programme to upgrade the fleet and so far has led to replacing a trio of ageing 'Emer' class OPV's.

A fourth sister, LÉ George Bernard Shaw earlier this month was floated-out of the building hall at Appledore downriver of Bideford. At that stage of the construction process, the hull and superstructure of the €67m newbuild were completed, though the mainmast and 76mm gun had yet to be added.

Published in Navy
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020

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