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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Lough Derg

#LoughDerg - Independent.ie reports that a man in his 60s has died after falling into Lough Derg yesterday morning (Thursday 9 February).

Emergency services were called to respond around 9.30am after the man fell into the water while walking with his wife at Terryglass, on the lough’s north-eastern shore.

After he was recovered by a local boat crew, the man was airlifted to University Hospital Limerick by the Shannon-based Irish Coast Guard helicopter Rescue 115 but later pronounced dead.

Published in News Update
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#LoughDerg - Two years after Lough Derg Marina sold for more than three times its guide price, another marina on the third-largest lake on the island of Ireland has come on the market.

As The Irish Times reports, more than €2.5 million is being sought for Cloondavaun Bay Marina near Portumna — a 50-berth property with almost a kilometre of lake frontage and a range of modern services for boat owners, as well a four-bed detached home.

Subject to planning, estate agents CBRE say the marina is most suited to aquatic tourism, from private berthing to angling and watersport on the lough.

There is also scope to expand its berthage to accommodate as many as 100 more vessels.

Published in Irish Marinas

Canoe facilities and services blocks are being provided at various locations around Lough Derg as part of a new inland waters initiative aimed at promoting water-based activities on Ireland’s third largest lake.

Clare County Council has confirmed that the proposed Lough Derg Canoe Trail, which is scheduled for completion by January 2017, will see facilities installed in Killaloe, Ballycuggeran, and Scarriff, Mountshannon and Dromaan harbours.

The Trail project is an initiative of the Lough Derg Marketing Group and is being funded under the Lough Derg Stimulus Fund. Waterways Ireland is leading the design and development of the project in partnership with the Clare County Council, Galway County Council and Tipperary County Council.

Trail information signage is being provided at Canal Bank, Killaloe, where upgrade works to the existing slipway are also being undertaken. Works underway at the Mill Yard, Killaloe include the provision of trail information signage, a canoe storage rack and planting/screening of same. The works to Scarriff harbour include trail information signage, a canoe storage rack and screening and the installation of a new floating landing/launching step.

The works at Ballycuggeran include the provision of trail information signage, a canoe storage rack and screening, while Mountshannon will benefit from trail information signage, a canoe storage rack, and screening and the refurbishment of the existing service block. Dromaan harbour will see the provision of trail information signage, a canoe storage rack and screening and the construction of a new 3-unit service block and holding tank.

Published in Canoeing
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Squibs from all over Ireland converged on Lough Derg Yacht Club at Dromineer at the weekend. Three came from the Royal North of Ireland in Belfast Lough, two from Killyleagh Yacht Club on Strangford Lough, two from Royal St George Yacht Club, and one from Royal Irish Yacht Club and one from the National Yacht Club in Dun Laoghaire, One from Howth Yacht Club, three from Kinsale Yacht Club, one from Galway Bay Sailing Club and plenty of Squibs from the home club. Only for a huge rugby funeral, there would have been many more boats from Kinsale. All in all, the entry of 20 Squibs equalled the Irish Championship in Kinsale a few weeks earlier.

Racing on Saturday was held on Lough Derg in the racing area North of the Corrikeen Islands, with windward-leeward courses. Initially there was almost no wind, so competitors paddled to the race area, and racing was postponed till a force two breeze from the south-south-east kicked in. In race one ‘The Worm’ sailed by Sam Lyness and Erk Heyes from RNIYC played the shifty wind and flat water to their advantage, to win the first race from Jack and Jill Roy’s ‘Kanaloa’ from NYC and ‘Fuggles’ sailed by Jeffs Condell and Cochrane who were using the new ‘Olimpic Sails.’ These prototype Squib sails depend on really bar tight rigging, unlike the normal set up for Squibs.

By race two the wind had swung to the south-east, again was light and shifty. This time the order was ‘The Worm’, ‘Fuggles’ and Gordon Patterson and Ross Nolan’s ‘Quickstep III.’
There was a quick break, for lunch afloat. By race three the wind was in the east, with the windward mark near the Tipperary shore. ‘Quickstep III’ skilfully handled the shifting winds, which were particularly trickey near the windward mark, and won from ‘The Worm’ and Simon Watson and Brian Kelly’s ‘Volante’ from Killyleagh.

‘The Worm’ nailed the start of the fourth race, with the same wind strength and direction, and held a decent lead from the fighting pack behind. It was Judy Hamilton and Vincent Delany’s ‘Greeb’ who stole second place from ‘Volante’ and ‘Quickstep’. This was the significant result which decided the championship.

On Saturday evening the Lough Derg club, and The Whiskey Still’s hospitality lived up to their reputations. ‘The Worm’ allegedly downed more gin and tonics than his overnight racing score.
On Sunday the forecast was for fourteen knots gusting to twenty-seven knots. Racing was held near Ryan’s Point, with the windward mark off Urra. This would test the skills of the sailors. In the first race the wind only got up to about 12 knots. ‘Quichstep III’ took the gun (in a race with winds shifting up to twenty degrees), from Des Clayton and Paul Henry in ‘Inismara’ in what was almost a photo finish. ‘The Worm’ took fifth place which was enough to give him the championship.

By the final race the wind, as forecast, was very gusty, which allowed the Squibs to plane on the running legs, and produced a few spectacular broaches. This time it was ‘Fuggles’ which won from ‘Quickstep’ and Colm Dunne and Emmet Ryans ‘Allegro’.

Thanks go to Commodore David Meredith and his team for organising a great regatta, and to Lt. Cdr. John Leech for acting as OOD in difficult conditions.

For full results see below.

Published in Squib
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#RNLI - Lough Derg RNLI was requested to launch by Valentia Coast Guard yesterday evening (Sunday 4 September) to assist a fisherman whose boat was wedged inside a rocky shoal.

At 5.50pm, the inshore lifeboat launched with helm Eleanor Hooker, Liam Knight and Keith Brennan on board. Winds were east-southeasterly Force 2 and visibility was good.

The lifeboat located the vessel in Youghal Bay, and the fisherman on board was found safe and wearing his lifejacket.

He was taken onto the lifeboat and an RNLI volunteer transferred across to the lakeboat before it was taken off the shoal and towed to safe harbour in Youghal Bay.

Peter Kennedy, deputy launching authority at Lough Derg RNLI, advises boat users "to bring charts with you and know the areas close to shore marked as unnavigable."

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Lough Derg RNLI Lifeboat launched at 5.20am, following reports to Gardaí of calls for help coming in off the lake.

At 05.06am this morning, Lough Derg RNLI Lifeboat was requested to launch by Valentia Coast Guard, following a report to Nenagh Gardaí of calls for help heard coming in off the lake, that woke sailors camping at Lough Derg Yacht Club.

As volunteer crew assembled, they were informed by Gardaí, who were at the Lifeboat Station, that a cruiser was seen to leave the public harbour close to the time the calls for help were heard.

The lifeboat launched at 05.18am with helm Eleanor Hooker, Ger Egan and Owen Cavanagh on board. Winds were light, southeasterly. Visibility was poor with fog and just before dawn.

The Irish Coast Guard Search and Rescue Helicopter team based at Shannon, were on standby should they be required.

The lifeboat set a route south, in the direction from which the calls were heard, and using a search light quickly located a cruiser at anchor close to the navigation channel, south of the Corrakeen Islands, outside Dromineer Bay.

The lifeboat crew roused the passengers on board and made them check that everyone was accounted for on board. The passengers said they may have been making some noise as they left the harbour earlier, and would be continuing their passage south at daybreak.

The lifeboat reported their findings to Valentia Coast Guard and, advised that the cruiser’s companion boat was moored in Dromineer Harbour, would check that they had no difficulties.

Once it was established neither vessel was missing a passenger, the lifeboat returned to station.

Brian Hanley, Deputy Launching Authority at Lough Derg RNLI Lifeboat, advises boat users to ‘respect the water, enjoy the lake, but ensure one person remains fully in command of your boat at all times’.

The lifeboat returned to Station and was ready for service again at 06.10am

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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At 3.30pm yesterday, Lough Derg RNLI Lifeboat was requested to launch by Valentia Coast Guard, following a report from people on shore at Mountshannon, that people were seen waving a distress signal on a cruiser outside the bay. The lifeboat launched at 3.45pm with helm Eleanor Hooker, Peter Clarke and Owen Cavanagh on board. Winds was westerly, Force 5/6 gusting 7. Visibility was good.

Nine people were on board, three adults and six children.

The lifeboat located the vessel in Mountshannon Bay at 4pm. All nine people on board were safe and unharmed and wearing their lifejackets. They had dropped anchor to prevent being pushed onto nearby rocks. An RNLI volunteer lifeboat crew was transferred to the casualty vessel where he reassured everyone, and then set up a bridle and tow. The lifeboat took the tow and went ahead of the cruiser to assist the RNLI volunteer weigh anchor, which had dug in and was holding fast.

The lifeboat towed the cruiser to Mountshannon Harbour where she was tied safely alongside at 4.30pm. The Lifeboat returned to station and was ready for service again at 5pm.

Pat Lynch, Deputy Launching Authority at Lough Derg RNLI Lifeboat advises boat users to ‘to check weather forecast before going afloat, make sure your boat is serviced and to carry a means of communication’.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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#Optimist - Results from Day 2 of the 2016 Optimist National and Open Championships on Lough Derg on Tuesday 16 August:

Senior Division, Gold Fleet
1st: Harry Twomey (RCYC and Crookhaven YC) – 21 pts; 2nd: Tom Higgins (RStGYC) – 23 pts; 3rd: Blake Wilson (AUS) – 28 pts

Senior Division, Silver Fleet
1st: Eoghan Turner (NYC) – 203 pts; 2nd: Kitty Flanagan (RStGYC) – 214 pts; 3rd: Kate Horgan (RCYC) – 278 pts

Junior Division, Gold Fleet
1st: Henry Heathcote (GBR) – 17 pts; 2nd: Freddie Lonsdale (GBR) – 29 pts; 3rd: Ella Lance (GBR) – 34 pts

Junior Division, Silver Fleet
1st: Johnny Flynn (HYC) – 72 pts; 2nd: Thomas O'Neill (HYC) – 192 pts; 3rd: Eimer McMorrow-Moriarty (Tralee Bay SC) – 217 pts.

(Main Fleet Sailed: 7, Discards: 1, To count: 6, Entries – Senior Fleet: 66, Junior Fleet: 91)

Regatta Fleet
1st: Russell Bolger (RStGYC) – 7 pts; 2nd: Jessica Riordan (RStGYC) – 13 pts; 3rd: Eibhe Lubliner (RStGYC) – 15 pts

(Sailed:6, Discards: 1, To count: 5, Entries: 53)

Published in Optimist
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#Optimist - Results from Day 1 of the 2016 Optimist National and Open Championships on Lough Derg, comprising Races 1, 2 and 3 on Monday 15 August:

Senior Division, Gold Fleet
1st: Harry Twomey (Royal Cork Yacht Club and Crookhaven YC) – 6 pts; 2nd: Tom Higgins (Royal St George YC) – 16 pts; 3rd: Blake Wilson (Australia) – 21 pts

Senior Division, Silver Fleet
1st: Eoghan Turner (National YC) – 95 pts; 2nd: Kitty Flanagan (RStGYC) – 111 pts; 3rd: Kate Horgan (Royal Cork YC) – 144 pts

Junior Division, Gold Fleet
1st: Henry Means (Great Britain) – 13 pts; 2nd: Hector Bennett (Great Britain) – 18 pts; 3rd: Ella Lance (Great Britain) – 21 pts

Junior Division, Silver Fleet
1st: Johnny Flynn (Howth YC) – 28 pts; 2nd: Adam Walsh (Howth YC) – 124 pts; 3rd: Thomas O'Neill (Howth YC) – 131 pts.

Regatta Fleet
1st: Russell Bolger (Royal St George YC) – 5 pts; 2nd: Rocco Wright (Howth YC) – 11 pts; 3rd: Jessica Riordan (Royal St George YC) – 11 pts

Published in Optimist
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Lough Derg Yacht Club in County Tipperary plays host to two hundred and eight sailors from ten countries in this week's five-day, ten-race Optimist National and Open Championships.

Today's opening ceremony took place at Dromineer. Led by pipers from the Thomas McDonagh Pipe Band, sailors, their families and event volunteers marched from the square in Dromineer to the clubhouse under their national banners. They were greeted there by Niamh McCutcheon, event organiser, and David Meredith, Commodore of LDYC. Cllr. Dr. Phill Bugler, Cathaoirleach of Nenagh Municipal District formally opened the Championship.

In her opening remarks, Dr. Bugler recalled that LDYC was founded in 1835 and is one of the oldest yacht clubs in the world. It has a proud record of having produced the Irish Optimist, Laser and Topper champions and the Mirror World Champions. "The contribution of this event to the local community and economy is immense", she added, " this is a major event for our district and we thank LDYC and its volunteers for all the hard work that made it possible". 

Aidan Staunton, Chairperson of IODAI, made a special presentation to Optimist sailor Tom Higgins from the Royal St. George Yacht Club in Dublin who was the first ever Irish sailor to win the British Optimist Championships in Scotland last week.

A presentation was also made to Jill Somerville who has given several years service to the Optimist Class, most recently as Chairperson, and whose contribution epitomises the best of volunteerism, without which amateur sailing in Ireland would be unable to function

Published in Optimist
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Page 7 of 18

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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