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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Lough Ree

This weekend saw the much-anticipated return to racing for two youth sailing fleets; the Mirror & 420 fleets. This joint event held at Lough Ree Yacht Club, was a Mirror Regional Championship and a 420 "Warm Up" Regatta.

The first 420 Regional is scheduled for the 26th & 27th of this month at Waterford Harbour Sailing Club, giving time for the Leaving Cert Sailors.

Nineteen boats competed, ten Mirrors and nine 420's and the conditions were sublime! Breeze on Saturday was fresh at times, enabling the 420's planing upwind. Lake sailing without sea swell offers dinghy Sailors a different experience however, when light conditions prevail, local knowledge can be useful! Race Officer Garrett Leech got 6 races in over the course of the weekend.

The start of a Lough Ree Yacht Club Mirror dinghy raceThe start of a Lough Ree Yacht Club Mirror dinghy race

In the Mirror Fleet, the Championship was dominated by Sligo Sister & Brother team, Jessica & Mark Greer who got bullets in 5 out of the 6 races. Second place overall again went to Sligo Sailors, Mia Canham & William Draper, and third overall went to Blessington Sailors; Jack McNaughton & Saoirse Lawley. A big shout out to local sailors (and first time racing!); Mathew Turner & Donnacha Dullea, who finished fourth overall and first in Bronze Fleet.

In the 420s, the "Warm Up" regatta was dominated by Jack McDowell (Malahide Yacht Club) & Harry Thompson (Wexford Harbour Boat & Tennis Club), who like their Mirror counterparts, won 5 bullets out of the 6 races. Second & third places overall went to local duo's; Eoghan Duffy & Luke Johnston and Alex Leech & Conor Paul, respectively.

Two of the competing 420 Teams will be travelling to Yacht Club San Remo in Italy for the 420 World Championship, which starts at the beginning of July and runs for almost two weeks. These teams are McDowell/Thompson & Hauer/Micka.

Mirror and 420 results from Lough Ree Yacht Club

Published in Youth Sailing
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Lough Ree RNLI volunteer lifeboat crew went to the aid of thirteen people as it responded to three separate call-outs on the northern waters of the lake over the past weekend.

The most significant event was on Saturday (12 June) when at 7.20 pm the charity’s volunteer lifeboat crew launched under helm Emmet Devereaux to go to the aid of a speedboat with nine people on board which was drifting in Bantry Bay. On reaching the scene it was found that the boat had run aground and damaged a propeller. The craft with nine people on board was taken under tow to a safe berth at Ballyleague.

Late on Friday evening, the Lough Ree RNLI lifeboat volunteer crew went to the assistance of a 23ft steel cruiser with two people on board which had run aground in Barley Harbour. The cruiser was towed off the rocks and following inspection towed to Barley Harbour. The RNLI volunteer lifeboat the ‘Tara Scougall’ returned to its base just before midnight.

On Sunday morning (13 June) the Lough Ree RNLI volunteer lifeboat crew returned to Bantry Bay on the Longford lakeshore where a 37ft cruiser with two people on board had run aground and was listing. Following the inspection, the boat was taken under tow to a safe berth in Lanesboro.

Reflecting on a busy weekend for the charity, Lough Ree RNLI volunteer operations manager Jude Kilmartin said: ‘this is the start of the busy season on the lake when all users of the waterway should in time of need make the emergency call to 999 or 112 at the earliest opportunity. It is a tribute to our volunteer crews that responses this weekend were successful and timely.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Lough Ree RNLI’s inshore lifeboat launched came to the assistance of two cruisers on the lake over the bank holiday weekend, taking seven people to safety.

Just after lunchtime on Saturday (5 June), the volunteer crew responded to a call from a cruiser with five people on board which was grounded on Kids Island near Lough Ree Yacht Club.

On reaching the scene, a line was attached to the grounded cruiser and it was taken on tow off the rocks and escorted to Coosan Point.

In the second incident, on Sunday evening (6 June), a member of the public raised the alarm when a cruiser was seen to be in difficulties in Portrunny Bay.

Under helm Tom Bradbury and with a volunteer crew on board, the Lough Ree lifeboat Tara Scougall reached the scene at 6.35pm. Following assessment, the boat was towed off the rocks and escorted to Portrunny on the Roscommon shore.

The two callouts bring to 11 the total of people the lifesaving charity has assisted on Lough Ree this June.

And as the summer season gains momentum, volunteer lifeboat operations manager Jude Kilmartin has reminded all of those who use the lake to “equip themselves fully and ensure that they are familiar with navigation maps and guidance for Lough Ree”.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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In two separate incidents, the Lough Ree RNLI volunteer lifeboat crew came to the assistance of six people at Gailey Bay and Nuns Island over the weekend.

At 6 pm on Saturday (29 May) the Lough Ree RNLI volunteer lifeboat crew under helm Kieran Sloyan responded to a call for assistance from a private cruiser with two people on board who had run aground in Gailey Bay near Portrunny. On arrival at the scene, the grounded cruiser was inspected and then taken under tow to safe water.

Yesterday evening (Sunday 30 May) a call was received from a rib with four people and a family pet on board who had experienced engine failure near Nuns Island. Under helm Shane McCormack the Lough Ree RNLI lifeboat ‘Tara Scougall’ with a volunteer crew launched just before 6 pm. On reaching the scene everyone was found to be safe and the stricken vessel was taken under tow to safe berthing in the Inner Lakes.

As the summer season begins and ahead of the June Bank Holiday weekend the Lough Ree RNLI volunteer Operations Manager Jude Kilmartin said: ‘It is so important for all who are planning trips on the lake or river to examine their equipment, prepare thoroughly, have a contact ashore and in the event of an emergency call 999 or 112 at the earliest opportunity.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Lough Ree RNLI volunteer lifeboat crew responded to two separate call-outs coming to the assistance of eight people on two different cruisers on Lough Ree on Saturday 22 May.

In the first instance, a boat had become grounded on a rock shelf, west of Inchmore Island on Lough Ree. The Lough Ree RNLI volunteer lifeboat was launched and reached the scene just before midday. The 17ft cruiser was found grounded and on inspection the engine of the boat was in need of repair.

In bright and breezy conditions the Lough Ree RNLI volunteer lifeboat crew took the boat under tow and brought it safely to a berth at Coosan Point marina.

Just before 6pm, the Lough Ree RNLI volunteer lifeboat ‘Tara Scougall’ was back in the water with another volunteer crew coming to the assistance of a 34ft boat which had run aground at Kid Island on Lough Ree. Under RNLI volunteer helm Emmet Devereux the craft was refloated and continued on its way.

Tom Bradbury, one of the helms at Lough Ree RNLI said: ‘Following unusual weather patterns obstacles on the lake can be hidden in rising waters. Boating enthusiasts are reminded of the importance of navigating within the marker buoys on the lake.’

As the new season on the lake begins in earnest Lough Ree RNLI Operations Manager, Jude Kilmartin said: ‘the charity looks forward to working closely with locals and visitors to our inland waterways.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Lough Ree RNLI is urging the public using the River Shannon and Lough Ree to be safety conscious as they make the seasonal return to the waterway this weekend.

The volunteer lifeboat crew at Lough Ree RNLI have, in line with Covid-19 protocols, returned to the water for training this month and are ready for the new season on the water.

With the combination of Easter holidays, an upcoming extension in travel limits and the hope for better weather over the next few weeks, it’s expected that Lough Ree and the River Shannon will attract large numbers of local visitors.

Jude Kilmartin, Lough Ree RNLI lifeboat operations manager, said: “We are asking everyone planning on taking to the water over the holiday period to refresh their safety procedures, check that all safety equipment is in working order and remember never to go on the lake or river without lifejackets.”

The volunteer crew of Lough Ree RNLI looks forward to working with the local community and serving those in Longford, Westmeath and Roscommon who avail of the local amenities over Easter.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, Waterways Ireland has appealed for all users of Ireland’s inland waterways not to take part in any activity on the water under the prevailing pandemic restrictions.

Published in Water Safety
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Lough Ree RNLI begins 2021 with the appointment of Jude Kilmartin as the station’s new volunteer Lifeboat Operations Manager. He succeeds Tony McCarth who held the post since 2017.

During his tenure, Tony McCarth led the volunteer crew of one of the country’s busiest lifeboat stations, welcoming the delivery of a new inshore lifeboat, the Tara Scougall, and most significantly overseeing the start of construction of a new €1.2m lifeboat station at Coosan Point in Athlone which is nearing completion.

Jude Kilmartin is not a stranger to the station, having served in the role of Deputy Launching Authority prior to his new position.

Taking over at the helm, Jude is looking forward to building on the work and leadership of his predecessor. He said: ‘On behalf of all the volunteers at Lough Ree RNLI, I would like to Tony for his leadership and dedication to the station over the last few years. I am now looking forward to taking up this role at a very exciting time for Lough Ree with our new station build nearing completion.

‘The most important thing for us at Lough Ree RNLI is to always be available to come to the assistance of visitors to Lough Ree and to those in the community who live around the lake in Longford, Westmeath and Roscommon.’

From its base near Athlone, Lough Ree RNLI’s volunteer crew responded to more than 40 call-outs last year helping people who got into difficulty on the lake.

The station has recently launched a major fundraising drive to raise €100,000 as a local contribution to the new boathouse which will greatly enhance the services to the community.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Lough Ree RNLI volunteer lifeboat crew located two kayakers following a short lake and shoreline search of the inner lakes of Lough Ree yesterday afternoon (Saturday 26 December).

The two men had departed Coosan Point at lunchtime and the alarm was raised by a member of the public when the kayakers had not returned to their car some 90 minutes later.

The Lough Ree RNLI volunteer lifeboat crew launched in Force 7 winds just after 3 pm. Under helm Emmet Devereux the volunteer lifeboat Tara Scougall began a search of the inner lakes and spotted the two kayaks ashore near Portaneena. In a follow-up shoreline search one of the volunteer lifeboat crew located the two kayakers safe and well.

Following the search volunteer lifeboat helm Emmet Devereux asked all lake users ‘to double-check weather forecasts for the entire duration of their trip on the water’.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Lough Ree RNLI volunteer lifeboat crew were requested to come to the assistance of four people on board a barge which ran aground on Saturday afternoon (12 December).

The 36ft Dutch barge was stranded where the River Shannon meets Lough Ree.

Launched at 1.30 pm in calm conditions, Lough Ree RNLI lifeboat Tara Scougall reached the scene near Lough Ree Yacht Club seven minutes later. The volunteer crew found all four people on board safe and well and proceeded to tow the barge off the rocks.

The Lough Ree RNLI volunteer crew assessed the barge for damage and accompanied the craft and crew to Athlone Town Marina.

Lough Ree RNLI Helm Stan Bradbury said, ‘Navigation can be difficult at this time of year for boat users, with obstacles hidden or obscured by Winter flood waters. We would also advise boat users to wear a lifejacket at all times for their own safety.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Coosan Point on Lough Ree is home to one of Ireland’s busiest lifeboat crews. But they operate from temporary facilities and the RNLI say they urgently need a permanent, new base to continue their lifesaving missions.

The Institute is seeking donations to help fund a new, purpose-built lifeboat station and are aiming to raise €100k.

Lough Ree volunteer crews have been rescuing people from the lake’s 28km stretch of inland water since 2012, launching more than 370 times and helping over 1,060 people.

The permanent station near the existing slipway at Coosan Point – crucial for the efficient launching and recovery of the lifeboat will include

  • Secure boathouse for lifeboat, launch tractor and trailer
  • Crew training and meeting rooms
  • Changing facilities, showers and WCs
  • Offices and operations room
  • Workshop and fuel storage facilities
Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020