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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Marine Notice

The Department of Transport has been advised by Vermilion Exploration & Production Ireland Limited of a maintenance campaign that will include an offshore pipeline and subsea structure inspection at the Corrib Gas Field subsea infrastructure.

This maintenance work was due to commence on Tuesday 14 May and will last for approximately 30 days.

A nearshore survey of the pipeline and umbilical of the Corrib subsea infrastructure will also take place. These works are due to commence on Friday 17 May and will last for approximately 10 days. All work dates are subject to weather and operational constraints.

Visual and acoustic surveys will be conducted by means of vessel- and ROV-mounted sensors. Electrical fault-finding will be conducted by ROV-mounted equipment.

The vessel EDT Jane (callsign 5BXW3) will undertake the subsea scope of work as part of the offshore pipeline and subsea structure inspection. All equipment used will be vessel and/or ROV mounted.

Elsewhere, the nearshore survey scope will be undertaken by the vessel Leah C (callsign EIQS5) while the vessels Macbel” (callsign EIHL5) and the Blue Eagle (callsign EI6808) will both provide safety and welfare support to Leah C. The vessels will be listening on VHF Channel 16 throughout the project.

Further information, including a map, coordinates and contact details, can be found in Marine Notice No 23 of 2024 attached below.

Published in Coastal Notes

The Department of Transport has been advised by Asso.Subsea that they are performing trenching trials on behalf of Nexans for CIDAC as part of the Celtic Interconnector Project.

The trenching trials will be located at various points along the planned route between the South East Coast of Ireland and the northern coast of France.

These trials are taking place from this week until Thursday 30 May, subject to weather and operational constraints, and are being conducted within the cable corridor extending around 200m each side of the planned cable centreline.

Works will be conducted by the trenching support vessel vessel Athena (callsign SVDO4). During the trenching trials, the vessel will be restricted in its ability to manoeuvre, and therefore all mariners are advised to provide a wide berth and navigate the area with caution.

The works vessel will keep a listening watch on VHF Channel 16 and will actively transmit an AIS signal.

Further information, including maps, coordinates and contact details, can be found in Marine Notice No 27 of 2024 attached below.

Published in Power From the Sea

The Department of Transport has been advised by Donegal County Council that it intends to begin refurbishment works at Rathmullan Pier and viaduct on the Fanad Peninsula north-east of Letterkenny.

These works are starting with immediate effect and will be ongoing for the next seven months until 30 November.

They are being carried out by marine civil engineering contractors working from a temporary compound at the head of the pier, using work vessels, a work pontoon, heavy civil engineering plant and equipment. Divers may also be employed on site from time to time.

For safety reasons, mariners are advised to avoid attempting to berth at Rathmullan Pier or pontoon as the ladders and stairway are to be removed and replaced, as well as the pontoon itself for the duration of the works.

Mariners are also advised to proceed slowly and with caution within the vicinity of Rathmullan Pier. Wave wash from vessels should be avoided.

For more details, including a map of the works area and contact information, see Marine Notice No 26 of 2024 attached below.

Published in Coastal Notes

The European Communities (Safe Loading and Unloading of Bulk Carriers) (Amendment) Regulations 2024 (SI No 110 of 2024) entered into force on 27 March 2024.

Changes to the regulations for the safe loading and unloading of bulk carriers now apply to all shipping terminals visited by bulk carriers for the loading or unloading of solid bulk cargoes, except those which are only visited by bulk carriers in exceptional circumstances.

The update also clarifies the requirements for regular verifications and unannounced inspections to be carried out by the Maribe Survey Office (MSO), and sets out the revised penalties for infringements.

For further details on the new regulations, see Marine Notice No 22 of 2024 attached below.

Published in Ports & Shipping

The Department of Transport has been notified by JD-Contractor that they will be performing out-of-service cutting and route clearance works on behalf of Nexans for CIDAC as part of the Celtic Interconnector Project.

The works will be located at various points along the planned subsea electricity cable route between the southeast coast of Ireland and the northern coast of France.

Works will begin on Wednesday 24 April and will continue for approximately 10 days, subject to weather and operational constraints.

The out-of-service (OOS) cable-cutting operations will be conducted within the cable corridor extending plus or minus 50 metres each side of planned cable centreline. The relevant waypoints can be found in Marine Notice No 20 of 2024, attached below.

The works will be conducted by the vessel MV Detector (callsign OUIV2) which will display the relevant lights and shapes during periods of restricted manoeuvrability and adhere to the International Regulations for the Prevention of Collisions at Sea (COLREGS) and all licensing requirements.

During OOS cutting operations, the vessel will keep a listening watch on VHF Channel 16 and will actively transmit an AIS signal. A listening watch will also be maintained on VTS VHF channels as appropriate. The vessel will broadcast daily, and at shorter intervals as may be required by passing traffic, the vessel position, operational information and planned operations for the next 24 hours.

Maps and coordinates as well as contact details are included in the Marine Notice below.

Published in Power From the Sea

The Department of Transport has been advised by Dublin Array that they will be conducting geophysical, geotechnical and environmental surveys for the Dublin Array offshore wind farm project.

Site investigation operations for the wind farm and the Expert Corridor Route (ECR) between the coast of Dublin and Wicklow will take place between Friday 19 April and the end of July, subject to weather and operational constraints.

The geophysical survey will be carried out by the vessel Fugro Helmert (callsign C6FT8). During these operations, the vessel will be towing equipment at a depth of up to five metres below the surface and extending some 300 metres astern.

The geotechnical survey will be carried out by the vessel M/V Flat Holm (callsign GHLZ) at fixed stations. The environmental survey will be carried out by the vessel Ros Áine (callsign EIZG5) in daytime hours only.

All vessels will be mobilised from Dun Laoghaire and will be restricted in their ability to manoeuvre, therefore all other mariners are advised to provide a wide berth and navigate with caution in the relevant area.

Coordinates and a map of the survey area, as well as contact details, can be found in Marine Notice No 18 of 2024, attached below.

Published in Power From the Sea

Fuinneamh Sceirde Teoranta (FST) will be undertaking both a geotechnical survey and geophysical survey for the Sceirde Rocks Windfarm Project in the Western Coastal Area (Connemara/Outer Galway Bay) and Atlantic Ocean, between Monday 15 April and Monday 10 June, subject to weather and operational constraints.

These surveys follow last September’s geophysical survey and will be undertaken by the multi-purpose offshore vessel Dina Polaris (callsign CQOF), which is fitted with a geotechnical drilling rig, and the research vessel Lady Kathleen (callsign EIXT2). Both vessels will operate up to 24 hours per day and will be displaying the appropriate lights and shapes.

During operations, the vessels will be restricted in their ability to manoeuvre. Therefore, passing vessels are requested to leave a wide berth during the deployment operations. Radio transmissions will be conducted with other seafarers to notify them of the operations. The vessels will be monitoring VHF Channel 16 at all times for safety purposes.

The equipment for each survey will be deployed within the bounds of the survey areas detailed in Marine Notice No 17 of 2024, attached below.

Published in Power From the Sea

Following cable lay operations set to conclude this weekend, Greenlink Interconnector Ltd will perform cable burial and trenching activities along the planned interconnector route.

These activities will be undertaken between Saturday 13 April and Thursday 20 June, subject to weather and operational constraints.

Operations will take place along the planned interconnector route between the landfall location near Baginbun Beach in Co Wexford and the middle of the Irish Sea. Coordinates and maps can be found in Marine Notice No 21 of 2024, attached below.

The works will be performed by the trenching support vessel Symphony (callsign LXTT). This vessel will have a trenching vehicle deployed or a remotely operated vehicle for survey activities deployed over the side.

As the work vessel will be restricted in its ability to manoeuvre, all other vessels operating within this area are requested to keep a wide berth and pass at minimum speed to reduce vessel wash. The work vessel will be listening to VHF Channel 16 and can set any other channel as required.

For further details, including contact information, see the Marine Notice below.

Published in News Update

Following the first and second legs in February and March, the third leg of this year’s Irish Anglerfish and Megrim Survey (IAMS 2024) is being carried out from Friday 12 to Sunday 21 April.

Surveys will be conducted to the North and North-West Coasts of Ireland by the Marine Institute in fulfilment of Ireland’s obligations under the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP).

Leg 3 is a demersal trawl survey consisting of approximately 50 otter trawls, each of 60 minutes duration, in ICES area 6a. Fishing in 2024 will take place within a three-nautical-mile radius of the positions indicated in Appendices 1 and 2 of Marine Notice No 12 of 2024, a PDF of which is attached below.

The survey will be conducted by the RV Celtic Explorer (callsign EIGB) which will display appropriate lights and signals. The vessel will be towing a Jackson demersal trawl during fishing operations.

The Marine Institute requests that commercial fishing and other marine operators keep a 3nm radius area around the tow points clear of any gear or apparatus during the survey period.

Further details are included in the Marine Notice below.

Published in Fishing

The Department of Transport has been advised that Next Geosolutions will perform shallow geotechnical surveys, pUXO ID surveys and KP5 Omega Loop surveys as part of the Celtic Interconnector Project cable route between the South-East Coast of Ireland and the coast of France.

The survey is expected to be completed over a 10-day period from this Wednesday 10 April, subject to weather and operational constraints.

Survey operations will be conducted within the cable corridor extending around 50m each side of the planned cable centreline.

The survey vessel NG Worker (callsign ICID) will carry out the survey works. Mariners are advised to provide a wide berth and navigate with caution in the area.

During survey operations, the vessel will keep a listening watch on VHF Channel 16 and will actively transmit an Automatic Identification System (AIS) signal. A listening watch will also be maintained on VTS VHF channels as appropriate.

The survey vessel shall broadcast daily, and at shorter intervals as may be required by passing traffic, the vessel position, operational information and planned operations for the next 24 hours. It is requested that fixed fishing gear within 1,000m of the route centreline be removed.

Coordinates and a map of the survey area as well as contact details can be found in Marine Notice No 13 of 2024 attached below.

Published in Power From the Sea
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020