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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Maritime Artist

Dublin Bay-based lone circumnavigator and maritime artist Pete Hogan will exhibit his latest works in his 'Open Studio' next Thursday, December 11th. 

The works entitled 'Red Sails' form part of the display and feature Galway Hookers and other traditional sailing craft as depicted above and below.

Hogan, who sailed solo around the world in his gaff ketch Molly B in the mid-90s, hosts his Open Studio at 153 Strand Road, Sandymount, Dublin 4. from 6 pm to 9 pm.

Children welcome, refreshments and music on the night. More details on mobile phone: 087 930 9559 and email: [email protected]

Hogan Red Saials artRed Sails by Pete Hogan

Published in Dublin Bay

Irish Marine Artist Pete Hogan will give a personal history of marine painting in Ireland with an emphasis, he says, on 'yots'. 

The Round the world sailor, artist and author will speak at the Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club on the West Pier this Thursday, February 2nd 2017 at 8pm.  

Entry is free and all are welcome.

Published in DMYC

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore. 

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.