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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Monaco Yacht Show

#MonacoYachtShow – This is a special year for the Monaco Yacht Show as the prestigious event celebrates its 25th anniversary.  The 2015 show, likewise of the previous quarter century is host to the world’s most exclusive gathering of extraordinary large superyachts, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The principality on the Côte d'Azur is the place to be seen and according to the show’s marketing is where the ‘House of Fine Yachting’ is on full display. Motoryachts lengths range from a modest 30m and up to the superyachts league of 80m. In addition to sailing yachts that are impressive with exhibitors of up to 56m. The four-day show that began mid-week concludes tomorrow, Saturday 26 September.

Around 500 exhibitors are nestled in Monte Carlo’s harbour of the Port Hercules, where world leading luxury yachting companies, among them the trendiest superyacht builders, yacht designers, luxury manufacturers are gathered. In addition the most important brokerage houses. All this against the backdrop of the azur seas of the Mediterranean.

The show has the privilege of benefiting from the recognition and the support of Prince Albert II of Monaco. Earlier this year, Afloat.ie reported a reception held in the Yacht Club de Monaco (YCM), where Prince Albert marked the occasion of the twinning of YCM and the Royal Cork Yacht Club.

Last year, the motoryacht, M.Y. Katrion of almost 40m visited several Irish ports. Among them Cork City Marina which accommodated the impressive 10-guest, Feadship built vessel.

After her summer visit, the 401 tonnes Katrion returned to sunnier climes as she made an appearance as an exhibitor at last year’s Monaco Yacht Show.

Published in Marine Trade
Prince Albert II of Monaco is to make a state visit to Ireland next week which is to include a tour of the Marine Institute in Co. Galway, according to Department of Foreign Affairs, writes Jehan Ashmore
The three-day visit is to mark the 50th anniversary of the visit of his late parents, Prince Rainier III and Princess Grace in 1961. The Hollywood actress had ancestors from Newport, Co. Mayo. Accompanying his serene highness, will be his his fiancée, Charle Wittstock and a trade delegation.

Prince Albert's visit to the Marine Institute headquarters in Oranmore will be held on the final day of the visit on 6 April. Prior to that the prince will hold meetings with An Taoiseach, Enda Kenny, minister for the marine, Simon Coveney, minister for the environment, Phil Hogan and Dublin's Lord Mayor, Gerry Breen.

The Head of Monaco will open an exhibition in honour of his late mother at Farmleigh House and the prince will host a reception to highlight Irish literature and art. In addition to honouring the royal visit a state dinner will be held by President Mary McAleese.

The world's second smallest state is home to the Musée Océanographique de Monaco which has an impressive collection of aquariums. Though the principality is more synonymous with the hosting of Formula 1 Grand Prix. The event is at the end of May and is expected to attract a higher than usual number of cruiseships totalling 12 cruise-calls.

Mostly they will be on charter and accompanied by mega-yachts which are to dock at the outer pier or anchor offshore and along the French Riviera at Villefranche, Nice and Cannes. At the far side of summer Monte Carlo's Port Hercule is also to host the Monaco Yacht Show in September.

Published in Marine Science

The Irish Sea and possibly the Irish East Coast may see more super yacht traffic thanks to an Isle of Man Government initiative aimed at registering more Super yachts on the island after the Monaco Yacht Show later this month. Four government representatives are travelling to the famous tax haven in the hope of attracting more business.

The island's super-yacht industry has grown by 20% in the past year and there are currently 95 commercial yachts registered with the Manx flag.

The Isle of Man government is confident business will increase as a result of having a presence in Monaco.

Director of the Isle of Man Ship Registry Dick Welsh told the BBC: "It is difficult to quantify how much the industry is worth to the Isle of Man.

"The registration charge is £700 but then there is the technical management, crew management, chartering and insurance.

"It's a thriving industry which employs around 100 people on the Island."

More from the BBC HERE.

Published in Cruise Liners

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020