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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Mooring

The Department of Transport, Tourism & Sport has issued a product warning for potential risk with the use of a mooring rope of non-European origin.

The rope, under the Marina Maxi brand of Axiom Cordages based in Mumbai, India, does not comply with relevant European standards as it could come apart during usage, and the parted rope could hit someone on board, causing injury or even death.

The affected product is a 12-strand mooring rope: UV stabilized high grade, synthetic compound with polyester and polypropylene, white colour (6ft canvas, covered and FIV tucks with compliance to OCIMF standards, eyes spliced at both ends).

This is not to be confused with a now-recalled product warning for a 24-strand mooring rope, comprising 50% polyester and 50% polysteel with a 52mm diameter, a breaking load of 60 tons and a length of 220 metres, without permanent marking. A marine casualty investigation report from Greek authorities clears up confusion over the rope's origins.

Owners and users of Marina Maxi ropes detailed herein should be advised of the risks and take appropriate action.

[This post was updated on 27 February 2020 to reflect an update to European Union records as to the affected mooring rope.]

[This post was updated on 4 March 2020 to include a link to the HBMIC report into an incident involving the affected mooring rope.]

[This post was updated on 5 March 2020 to correct the country of origin and manufacturer of the affected mooring rope.]

Published in Marine Warning
Tagged under

#HowToSail - A new series of short yachting courses at the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School (INSS) begins with a one-day course on various techniques for mooring and handling a yacht under power.

This day-long course (9.30am-5pm) will run three times over the summer, with the first on Sunday 7 May, and covers the following topics:

  • Basic engine checks
  • Throttle and gear controls
  • Rudder, propellers, propwalk and pivot points
  • Going ahead and astern
  • Use of wind and stream to aid manoeuvres
  • Manoeuvring in confined spaces
  • Moving to and from a marina berth under power
  • Use of springs and other berthing techniques

The €99 course is recommended for any sailors heading abroad over the summer months who want to brush up on moving about tighter spaces, or those thinking about doing an ICC assessment.

Full details are available on the INSS website HERE.

Published in How To Sail

#InlandWaters - With the end of the winter mooring period yesterday (Friday 31 March), Waterways Ireland reminds boaters on the Shannon Navigation, including the Shannon-Erne Waterway, that the five-day rule now applies at all public moorings.

Boats users may remain in one location for up to five days and then must leave that public mooring to allow for other boat users to arrive and enjoy the amenities throughout the River Shannon.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland say that floating moorings in Mountshannon Harbour on Lough Derg which had been closed to the public due to damage as a result of winter floods have now been reopened. 

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland reminds masters and owners of vessels that the winter mooring period finishes on the Shannon Navigation which includes the Shannon–Erne Waterway on Thurs 31 March. 

Published in Inland Waterways

 

#HaveYourSay - With Ireland making a big push for this country's marinas at the London Boat Show this week, Afloat.ie reader Conan Breslin came to us with the following question about mooring for visiting boats in Ireland:

There seems to be no way of getting a mooring certified in Ireland. I own a 40ft Colin Archer yacht in Co Donegal and have often considered the possibility of leaving her on a swinging mooring. However every time I approach the subject with my UK insurer, the question of certification comes up.

Is there an authority which is available in this country that would be in a position to do this? The requirement is for shackles/rope or chain and the anchor to be inspected and signed off on for the season. Could this be addressed so that the visitor mooring system could be more widely used? The use of visitor mooring is not only beneficial to the visiting yachtsman but also less damaging to the seabed.

Secondly, living in the North West of Ireland it is plainly seen that the lack of infrastructure in our many harbours and almost zero marina facilities for the length of our coastline is not a great selling point. Visitors want to be able to leave a yacht and not have to deal with very often begrudging and uncaring commercial users.

Gweedore has the potential for a large marina although the development of such would require some major investment. However it would provide a 50nm stop between Lough Swilly and Killybegs (due to have a marina some time in the near future, I believe). So how does one go about making a proposal to see if it's a feasible option for investment?

What do you think of Conan's queries and suggestions? Let us know in the comments below!

Published in Your Say

Three Sisters Marina at New Ross in County Wexford is on the River Barrow and it is New Ross Town Council facility. It is nine miles up river from the confluence of the Suir and Barrow and it is 18 nautical miles from the sea at Hook Head.

The marina is a modern 66 berth facility. The marina has electrical shore power, mains water toilets and shower facilities. Alongside the marina is a major lift-out facility catering for vessels up to 50 tonnes.

The Marina Manager: John Dimond. The Email: [email protected]
Phone: 086 3889652 or 051 421284

Published in Irish Marinas

The pontoon jetty at Ballast Quay in Sligo is designed to be used primarily for day trips or shortterm stays in the City. The facility is made available for use by owners and authorised crew of leisure craft owned, managed and operated by Sligo County Council (SCC).

The pontoon is available to all local and visiting leisure craft and also available for long-term berthing either with or without crew.

The pontoon will also be available on a limited basis to sailing clubs wishing to host events during the sailing season. 

Access to the Jetty area and to the pontoon is controlled by security coded locks, which (in the interests of security) are changed on a regular basis.

A pdf download of the Sligo County Council rules for the jetty is downloadable as a pdf document below

sligopontoon2012

The boating pontoon at Ballast Quay in Sligo. Photo: WM Nixon

Published in Irish Marinas
Tagged under

Arthurstown Pier is at Waterford Harbour’s eastern shore, seven miles north of Hook Head lighthouse. It  is directly east of Passage East. The small quay has a stone bottom. In 2010, following the provision of €56,250 to improve boat access on piers along the Hook Peninsula such as Ballyhack, Slade and Arthurstown Wexford County Council installed a small pontoon facility to encourage leisure boating in the area. As well as local boaters the faciility is also proving popular with local fishermen.

Published in Irish Marinas

After first hatching its harbour plan over five years ago, National Tourism Award winning village Portmagee in County Kerry now looks certain to see a new pontoon finally installed at Portmagee pier in 2013. It will be a further boost for a Kerry already popular with visiting yachts and boats.

The idea is to link the network of facilities that terminate in West Cork with new facilities in County Kerry and Portmagee will be an important link in this process.

The plans are that both local Skellig Rock tourism boat operators and up to 20 visiting yachts at any one time can use the new village pontoon once it is installed.

The facility is being developed through a local community initiative with funding from Kerry County Council and Failte Ireland.

Published in Irish Marinas
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020