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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Netherlands

#AvenhornArrives – Former Naval Service OPV LÉ Aisling under her new name Avenhorn arrived in Dutch waters following a five-day towage delivery voyage, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The operation began on Sunday to tow Avenhorn from Cork Harbour from where the oldest unit of the navy dating to 1980 had been laid-up in the Naval Basin on Haulbowline.

The final 'Emer' class OPV built by Verolme Cork Dockyard had served the navy for 36 years until decommissioned last year in her adopted homeport of Galway.

Bere Island based tug Ocean Bank which at 33m is more than half the length of Avenhorn arrived on Thursday to navigate the New Waterway (Nieuwe Waterweg). The canal connects the North Sea and the Port of Rotterdam.

Last month Dutch shipbroker, Dick van der Kamp Shipsales B.V. bid for the vessel that was sold at public auction for €110,000 through auctioneer Dominic Daly.

The new owners plan to refurbish Avenhorn which is registered in Belize and then place the vessel for re-sell.

 

 

Published in News Update

#ANGLING - Ireland's shore angling team have taken the bronze medal at the 2012 World Shore Angling Championship held at Veere in the Netherlands.

Brian Cooke of the Irish Federation of Sea Anglers (IFSA) reports that the fishing was very tough over the week, with anglers casting into a shipping channel that contained tackle grabbing ledges.

The predominant species were dabs to 30cm, whiting, pouting and some lovely soles, he says, noting that the weather was very changeable, and gales combined with big tides to test the resolve of the competitors. Most fish were taken at distance and zones were won with 15-25 fish.

The Irish team improved their position each day, finishing seventh on day 1 and moving up to fifth and fourth on succeeding days.

Coming into the final session, the Irish needed to close a four-point gap on the Italian team in third, which Cooke describes as "a massive gap to overturn in this event given the quality of the opposition".

But the Irish team pulled it off, says Cooke, "using all their experience and skills to leapfrog the Italians and claim another World Championship medal for an Irish Shore team.

"The qualification pool system has certainly proved a success, this medal adding to the gold won by Ireland in South Africa in 2010," he adds.

Cooke congratulated team manager Tom Lillis and the six-man squad: Martin Howlin, Joe Duggan, John O’ Brien, Derek Kenrick, Eugene Farrelly and Kieran Begadon.

Published in Angling
Ahead of the Tall Ships Races in Waterford which begin tomorrow, Waterford Today presents 50 facts you may not be aware of regarding the annual event and its host city for 2011.
Did you know, for instance, that Waterford was once home to some of the most sophisticated shipbuilding operations of the 19th century, and was this country's leading location for iron shipbuilding from the mid-1840s to the early 1860s?
Or that the 55-metre barque Europa, from the Netherlands, is celebrating 100 years afloat in 2011?
More interesting facts about the ships competing in this year's races are available HERE.

Ahead of the Tall Ships Races in Waterford which begin tomorrow, Waterford Today presents 50 facts you may not be aware of regarding the annual event and its host city for 2011.

Did you know, for instance, that Waterford was once home to some of the most sophisticated shipbuilding operations of the 19th century, and was this country's leading location for iron shipbuilding from the mid-1840s to the early 1860s?

Or that the 55-metre barque Europa, from the Netherlands, is celebrating 100 years afloat in 2011?

Waterford Today has more interesting facts about this year's races HERE.

Published in Tall Ships

Two Dutch naval frigates, HNLMS Tromp and HNLMS Van Amstel are due to arrive into Dublin Port tomorrow for a courtesy visit over the weekend, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The Royal Netherlands Navy HNLMS Van Tromp is a De Zeven Provinciën-class air-defence and command frigate (LCF). The class has a striking streamlined visual appearance, through the use of stealth design technology. The stealth design is to minimise the vessels signature as much as possible from the detection of enemy vessels using radar.

At 6,050 tonnes, the stealth frigate is one of five built by the Royal Schelde Group, of Flushing, Netherlands. Spain and Germany also participated during the design stage of the 144-metre class which are powered by gas turbine engines capable of reaching 30 knots.

They are equipped with an Oto Breda 127 mm cannon, vertical launch system (VLS) Mk 41 for Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile (ESSM), Standard Missile and Harpoon Missiles. In addition the frigate has a Goalkeeper (rapid-fire gun), a Oerlikon 20 mm machine gun and a Mk. 46 Torpedo weapon system. The vessel also has the ability to carry a Lynx or NH-90 helicopter.

The second frigate to visit the capital is HNLMS Van Amstel, one of two multi-purpose M-class frigates. The frigate which is also known as the Karel Doorman class can be used for surface warfare and anti-submarine warfare. They also have their own air-defence capabilities.

The 122-metre vessels displace 3,300 tonnes and have a two Rolls Royce (Spey 1A) gas turbines delivering 29 knots. The class are equipped with an array of defence / attack armament to includes an Oto Melara 76 mm gun for surface and air targets, a Harpoon weapon system and a NATO Sea Sparrow Vertical Launch weapon system for use against air targets at close range. Like the De Zeven –class the M-class frigate is also capable of carrying a Lynx helicopter.

Published in Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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