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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: O'Brien

#Rowing: Irish crews were amongst the winners again at the World Masters Regatta in Denmark today. Denis Crowley of Commercial and Niall O’Brien of Carlow won in the men’s single sculls for competitors 50 years or more and the Belfast Boat Club women’s coxed four (average age 60 or more) also won.

World Masters Regatta, Copenhagen (Irish interest - Winners; 1,000m)

Men

Single Sculls - D (average age 50 years or more) - Heat Two: Carlow Rowing Club (N O’Brien) 3:58.63. Heat 10: Commercial (D Crowley) 4:08.63.

Women

Four, coxed - F (average age 60 years or more) - Heat One: Belfast Boat Club 4:42.79.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Sinéad Jennings and Claire Lambe ended their campaign at the World Cup Regatta in Varese with a commanding performance to win the C Final of the lightweight double sculls. They led all the way and were four lengths clear of nearest rivals, Italy Three, at the finish.  

 Ireland had two competitors in the repechage of the women’s lightweight single sculls. There were two places on offer in an A Final, but Poland and Switzerland One took these. Siobhán McCrohan finished fifth and Denise Walsh sixth.  In the lightweight men’s four, Ireland battled it out for third in the C Final with Austria, losing out by .15 of a second.  In the C Final of the women’s pair, Leonora Kennedy and Barbara O’Brien finished third. Norway pipped Ukraine to win.

World Cup Regatta, Varese – Day Two (Selected Results, Irish interest)

Men

Lightweight Four – C Final (places 13 to 16): 1 Canada One 6:09.73, 2 Serbia 6:11.21, 3 Austria 6:15.85, 4 Ireland (L Seaman, M O’Donovan, L Keane, S O’Driscoll) 6:16.00.

Women

Pair – C Final (places 13 to 16): 1 Norway One 7:22.74, 2 Ukraine 7:23.16, 3 Ireland (L Kennedy, B O’Brien) 7:33.07.  

Lightweight Double Sculls – C Final (places 13 to 17): 1 Ireland (C Lambe, S Jennings) 7:17.24, 2 Italy Three 7:26.29, 3 Chile 7:29.71.  

Lightweight Single Sculls – Repechage (First Two to A Final; rest to B Final): 1 Poland Two 7:49.90, 2 Switzerland One 7:51.76; 5 Ireland Two (S McCrohan) 8:04.69, 6 Ireland One (D Walsh) 8:08.81

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: The inaugural rowing blitz for those who are new to the sport of rowing will take place this Friday, November 13th  at Trinity College, Dublin. More than 400 competitors from around Ireland are set to take part. The event will not only give students the opportunity to test themselves as indoor rowers in a competitive environment for the first time, it will also give these youngsters a feel for what university life has to offer.

RTÉ news2day will attend the event.

The day will feature talks from former Olympian and World Championship medalist Neville Maxwell, physiotherapist and Trinity lecturer Dr Fiona Wilson – who will deal with rowing posture – and Sally O'Brien, won the women's senior eights championships in with Trinity (Dublin University Ladies' Boat Club) in 2015.

The winner of each category will receive a trophy and medals sponsored by Leinster branch of Rowing Ireland. Each category of winners will also receive free entry into the Irish Indoor Rowing Championships, which will be held at the University of Limerick sports arena in January.

The event will be facilitated by students rowing at Trinity college, together with over 70 students who have trained up over the last months to be Rowing Ireland transition year coaches.

Racing will start at 10am and the programme will finish at 2pm.

Published in Rowing

# Rowing: Leonora Kennedy and Barbara O’Brien won the women’s pair final at the Ireland trial at the National Rowing Centre, beating the combination of Monika Dukarska and Aifric Keogh. Michael Maher, a former lightweight international, competed in the heavyweight single and won that final. Paul O’Donovan was the convincing winner of the lightweight single, while his brother and partner in the lightweight double, Gary, was second, 19 seconds back. Sanita Puspure won her heat of the heavyweight single convincingly and was exempted from having to compete in a final.

Ireland Trial, National Rowing Centre, Cork, Sunday (Selected Results; Finals unless stated):

Men

Pair: UCD 7:21.23.

Single Sculls: 1 M Maher 7:56.61, 2 S McKeown 7:59.18, 3 R Byrne 8:02.46

Lightweight Single: 1 P O’Donovan 7:22.63, 2 G O’Donovan 7:41.77, 3 S O’Driscoll 7:48.99.

Women

Pair: 1 L Kennedy, B O’Brien 8:10.35, 2 M Dukarska, A Keogh 8:19.19.

Single Sculls – (Heat): S Puspure 7:50.46. Under-23: 1 E Hegarty 8:56.88, 2 E Lambe 9:11.60, 3 M Cremin 9:16.75.

Lightweight Single: 1 C Lambe 8:17.22, 2 Sarah Dolan 8:26.55, 3 D Walsh 8:27.77.

 

 
Rowing Ireland - October Trials - Result of Finals
12:30
W2-
Final
1
Portora/UCC
8:10:35
2
Killorglin/UCC
8:19:19
12:35
WB1X
Final B
1
Lee - Synnott
9:18:23
3
UCC - O'Sullivan
9:33:98
2
Lee - Littlewood
9:39:52
12:40
WB1X
Final A
1
Skibbereen - Hegarty
8:56:88
3
UCD - Lambe
9:11:60
2
Lee - Cremin
9:16:75
4
Belfast - Blundell
9:28:03
12:45
M1X
Final C
2
Fermoy - Morrison
8:16:64
3
Shandon - O'Sullivan
8:21:23
1
Killorglin - Crowley
8:21:81
4
Portadown - Laivins
8:51:18
12:50
M1X
Final B
2
UCD - Hughes
7:58:71
1
UCC - Casey
8:01;91
3
Castleconnell - Whittle
8:09:53
4
Lee - Larkin
8:13:00
12:55
M1X
Final A
3
Commercial - Maher
7:56:51
4
Portadown - McKeown
7:59:18
2
Shandon - Byrne
8:02:46
1
OCBC - Neale
DNF
13:05
MS2-
Final
0
UCD 2-
7:21:23
13:05
WL1X
Final
3
OCBC - Lambe
8:17:72
1
Commercial - Dolan
8:26:55
4
Skibbereen - Walsh
8:27:77
2
Tribesman - McCrohan
8:46:96
0
Belfast - Quinn
8:54:04
13:10
LM1X
Final D
1
Cork - O'Connell
8:08:19
3
Skibbereen - Ryan
8:09:69
2
Shandon - Merz
8:13:87
4
Shandon - Channon
8:20:34
13:15
LM1X
Final C
2
Shandon - Prendergast
7:59:09
1
Shandon - Lonergan
8:09:78
4
UCC - Synnott
8:16:14
3
Skibbereen - McCarthy (J)
8:21:42
13:20
LM1X
Final B
1
St Michael's - O'Connor
7:52:90
2
Shandon - Hennessy
7:57:56
3
NUIG - Keane
7:58:49
4
Waterford - Goff
8:01:08
13:25
LM1X
Final A
1
Skibbereen - O'Donovan (P)
7:22:63
2
Skibbereen - O'Donovan (G)
7:41:77
3
Skibbereen - O'Driscoll
7:48:99
4
Skibbereen - McCarthy (F)
8:00:48
Published in Rowing

With boat sales falling by as much as 80%, marina business down 20%, retail sales in chandlery down up to 38%, insurance down 12.5% the marine industry in Ireland and Wales had to take some action to ensure the marine trade and leisure industry survives.

An unusual industry conference took place in Dun Laoghaire today and yesterday with the objective of understanding where the industry is right now and how it needs to act to ensure that it survives the downturn in our economies.

Over 125 marine businesses from both sides of the Irish Sea will be attending in what will be the largest marine leisure Industry gathering ever brought together.

A joint address was given by the Executive Director of the British Marine Federation, Howard Pridding and David O'Brien the Chairman of the Irish Marine Federation set the scene as to where the industry is on both sides of the Irish Sea.

The conference heard from 3 companies who operate in the sector. One from each region, North Wales, South Wales and Ireland who will share with the conference their experiences in the current economic climate on how they are surviving and thriving in the downturn. Business tactics that need to be deployed were explored with a leading business and innovation specialist from Wales together with joint talks by Visit Wales and Failte Ireland on the development of marine leisure tourism.

Leading economist Jim Power delivered a talk on the economic situation and when we might begin to see some consumer confidence return to our markets.

The Pembroke Coastal Forum told how they have managed their coastline and environment and how they have facilitated marine leisure tourism through proper marine spatial planning.

The conference is being organised by irish-sea.org and Ireland/Wales Interreg IV A Programme funded by the European Region Development Fund.

Irish-sea.org has three partners, North Wales Watersports, South West Wales Marine Federation and the Irish Marine Federation.

Published in Marine Federation

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020