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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Parteen weir

Waterways Ireland has closed the public footpath running south from O’Briensbridge playground alongside the River Shannon south of Parteen Weir for the foreseeable future, following the discovery of critical failures in two culverts under the path.

Preliminary investigations revealed the need for urgent replacement work on both culverts, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says.

It adds that due to the sensitive habitat at the site on the Clare/Limerick border, planning permission is required before the works can go ahead, and this could take up to six months to come through.

“The health and safety risks associated with the two structures are such that it is essential the route is closed and remain so, until after the refurbishment works are completed,” it says.

“Waterways Ireland is aware that this is a popular route for the local community and apologises for any inconvenience caused by this closure.”

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland has advised all users of the Shannon Navigation that remedial work to effect repairs to the infrastructure between Limerick City to Parteen Weir has been delayed and the navigation will not open this week as anticipated.

As Afloat.ie reported in May, the stretch of navigation was closed due to continuing high flow rates and infrastructural deficiencies as a result of the winter storms and subsequent flooding.

Published in Inland Waterways

Limerick's newly appointed Minister of State Patrick O'Donovan has been asked to intervene with Waterways Ireland to reopen navigation of the River Shannon at Limerick city and avoid the loss of marine tourism revenue to the city writes Andrew Carey.

As Afloat.ie reported earlier, on April 25, Waterways Ireland issued a marine notice advising all users that the river from Limerick city to Parteen Weir would close to navigation.

It cited the "continuing high flow rates and infrastructural deficiencies as a result of the winter storms and subsequent flooding" as reasons for the closure.

Waterways Ireland said that the "floating breakwater at the entrance to the Abbey River in Limerick is no longer in place to protect vessels from striking the fixed weir. Also, there are many strong currents and eddies making navigation dangerous for both large and small craft.

A safety inspection of other damaged floating pontoons further upstream was to be carried out "when water levels and flows permit. Meanwhile, users are advised to stay clear of these until a further Marine Notice is issued on this matter."

Remedial works have yet to take place and the waterway remains closed to all marine traffic during the peak summer season.

Sailors from local sailing clubs wishing to access the Shannon now face the prospect of missing completions and events around the west coast and beyond as they can not pass through the navigation.

Last year, a six point plan to boost marine tourism on the Shannon and in Limerick was launched by then Education Minister Jan O'Sullivan.

The plans, drafted by Limerick marine enthusiasts to benefit local tourism, heritage and education, were submitted to Waterways Ireland.

Well-known boatman Pat Lysaght said that "Limerick is effectively landlocked and until these issues are rectified we will continue to lose out".

Calling for immediate intervention by Minister O'Donovan, who has responsibility for tourism and sport, Cllr Emmett O'Brien said the closure of the waterway "means no boats can sail from Limerick city to Killaloe. This may have a serious impact on local tourism and is contrary to all lip service being paid to Limerick being a riverside city.

"We need a clear and accurate response from Waterways Ireland and the Council why this has occurred and our local Minister for State for Tourism must intervene to ensure this navigation route does not remain closed."

Fianna Fáil Deputy Niall Collins said that it was of huge concern that "Limerick City is effectively closed off to marine tourism and this is having a detrimental impact on tourism across the Shannon region.

“I’m calling on Waterways Ireland to outline when the navigational hazards it has identified along the river will be addressed. We need to know the planned schedule of works and when the river will be reopened to marine traffic.

"We can’t have a situation whereby boats cannot sail up or down the River Shannon during the peak of the tourist season. This needs to be addressed without delay."

At the time of going to press, Limerick City Council and Minister O'Donovan had failed to respond to queries.

Waterways Ireland issued this statement on Wednesday afternoon.

"The stretch of navigation from Limerick city to Parteen Weir remains closed to navigation due to continuing infrastructural deficiencies as a result of the winter storms and subsequent flooding.

"Waterways Ireland, following the 2015/2016 flooding event has and continues to restore the infrastructure right along the Shannon navigation following on from the damage caused by record flood levels and the prolonged duration of these floods during last winter.

"However, Waterways Ireland has limited resources available to it and has had to prioritise its' interventions in those areas of greatest need and use."

The statement did not indicate any timeframe for reopening of the navigation.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all users of the Shannon Navigation that the stretch of navigation from Limerick City to Parteen Weir is closed to navigation due to continuing high flow rates and infrastructural deficiencies as a result of the winter storms and subsequent flooding.

Users should note that the floating weir at the entrance to the Abbey River in Limerick is no longer in place to protect vessels from striking the fixed weir. Also, there are many strong currents and eddies making navigation dangerous for both large and small craft.

Floating pontoons have been damaged and are not suitable for mooring to or walking on, safety inspection of these will be carried out when water levels and flows permit. Meanwhile, users are advised to stay clear of these until a further Marine Notice is issued on this matter.

Published in Inland Waterways

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020