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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Pier Repairs

As previously reported on Afloat.ie works to repair Bulloch Harbour in Dalkey along south Dublin Bay is focused on a pier damaged by Storm Emma in March of last year, writes Jehan Ashmore.

According to Bullock Harbour Preservation Association the repairs to the pier's outer north-eastern corner which is exposed to the bay is almost complete. The pier leads off from a quay where a controversial mixed development was recently given the go ahead by An Bord Pleanála at the site of the former Western Marine premises.

The Association which liaises with public bodies and other interested parties to ensure the harbour functions and remains a public asset also provided an update concerning the pier's inner south-western corner.

At this section of the pier which had been subsiding since last summer has now been totally dismantled down to the harbour bottom. It is at this level where new concrete foundations have been laid underwater so that the granite blocks can be reset in their original positions. A completion date for this work is not yet known.

The scenic stone-cut harbour built in 1818/19 by the Ballast Board (now Dublin Port Company) still manages the small working harbour which celebrated its Bicentenary last winter. The small harbour is home to inshore fishing boats engaged in crab and lobster, boat moorings, boat rental operations, the Dalkey Sea Scouts, kayakers, sea anglers and for other marine leisure pursuits.

Access for such activity requires roads in the vicinity of Bulloch Harbour which is the responsiblity of Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council. The local authority is currently inviting the public and interested parties to submit obervations and submissions to the Bulloch and Sandycove Harbours Draft Masterplan as previously included. The neighbouring harbour at Sandycove is located further along the coast to the north in Scotsman's Bay.

For further details on the Masterplan click here noting the closing date for submissions is Monday, 19th August.

Published in Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore. 

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.