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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Port of New Ross

The Port of New Ross will not be able to reopen to shipping traffic on the scale it was hoped this month due to a delay in completing health and safety works.

Executive scientist with Wexford County Council Brendan Cooney said the taking in charge process of New Ross Pier/Port is ongoing.

Speaking at the municipal council meeting, Mr Cooney said health and safety standards are being looked at and a new harbourmaster is being hired.

Mr Cooney said he is hopeful the port can reopen in the next few weeks.

Cllr John Fleming said he is aware there are problems with navigational equipment in the port.

More here from the New Ross Standard on the south-east inland port on the banks of the Barrow.

Published in Irish Ports

New Ross Standard reports on the handing over of the chains of municipal council power was a mere formality (last) Monday as Fianna Fáil Cllr Michael Whelan was voted in as cathaoirleach for the second time, two days after his party leader was named Taoiseach of a historic coalition.

Taking over from former chairman Cllr John Fleming, who held the role for two consecutive years, the Ballycullane man said it was a proud day for him and for his family.

Cllr Whelan thanked Cllr Fleming for his year in the chair, He said: 'Even though the world has changed very much from where were a few months ago, there are still ongoing events that we should be excited about in the New Ross municipal. Although we can expect the tightening of belts at all levels from national to council level I will make sure the New Ross town and district gets it's fair share,' sounding a note of measured optimism.

He said some exciting projects are in the pipeline which will help with the growth of our town and district.

'The removal of the oil tanks on the entrance into town will improve the look at this entrance point but should also give the opportunity for some kind of development in this area. The High Hill project should be completed in the coming year and this will be a welcome improvement and attraction to that end of town. We will also have the link from the Greenway which I hope will bring New Ross many new exciting opportunities.

We can also promote more along the Norman Way and help re-energise the tourism industry post Covid. We, in this district, are steeped in Norman heritage and have many attractions from Tintern to the Hook Head [lighthouse] and back to the town of New Ross. We also have taken on the Port of New Ross in the last year and have plans to develop the Quay to bring in tours from Waterford initially, but who knows where that could grow to.'

For more on the Co. Wexford town which is also Ireland's most inland port located on the River Barrow click here.

Published in Irish Ports

At the historic Port of New Ross shipping will soon be run by Belview Port in Waterford, in a controversial move planned by Wexford County Council.

As the New Ross Standard reports, the Director of Services for Economic Development Tony Larkin made the announcement at the first meeting of the new Wexford County Council term on Friday.

In an update to councillors ahead of the imminent transfer of the port from the state to Wexford County Council, Mr Larkin said: 'We are taking over the operation of the port. We have been in due diligence for two years.'

Mr Larkin said he was informed last week that the takeover process has been completed, save for three ministers signing the document which will formally allow the transfer.

'The process of having the ministers sign it has now commenced. Immediately upon transfer all assets and staff will transfer to us and we will have responsibility as the port authority. We are not in the shipping business. We are in discussions with the Port of Waterford at Belview about them acting as our agents managing the shipping for a fee.'

To read further comments from Mr Larkin and more click here. 

Published in Irish Ports

#InlandWaterways - The longest bridge in Ireland will finally be named in a fortnight's time after councillors in Piltown and New Ross voted by a small majority last week in favour of the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy name at separate council meetings.

Both New Ross and Piltown Municipal District Councils met last week reports The NewRoss Standard as the long-running saga of what to call the new bridge (see previous coverage) took up considerable time at both meetings.

In New Ross, Cllr Michael Sheehan went against his colleagues and opted for the William Marshal Bridge, with the seven other councillors voting for the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Bridge.

Over in Piltown, five out of the six sitting councillors voted for the Pink Rock Bridge. However, the fact that a single councillor in Piltown voted in favour of Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy means that, as it stands, the vote is at 8-6 in favour of naming the 887m bridge after John F Kennedy's mother.

New Ross and Piltown councillors will meet together on October 3 at the Rhu Gleen Hotel in Slieverue, where the name will be voted on for a final time. If all 14 councillors from New Ross and Piltown vote as per last week, the iconic bridge will officially be named the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Bridge, ending a two-year saga over what to call the impressive structure.

For further reading on the new bridge (click here).

Afloat adds that the structure is located downriver of the Port of New Ross on the River Barrow, but sited before the disused Barrow Bridge which carried the Waterford City-Rosslare Harbour stretch of the Limerick railway line. This smaller section of the railway route line however closed in 2010.   

The Barrow Bridge however remains in use albeit for the purposes of permitting shipping traffic to access New Ross. The bridge features a swing-bridge section that pivots to allow ships with up to 6,000 tonnes to transit the bridge and continue navigating upriver.   

Published in Inland Waterways

#InlandWaterways - The scale of the New Ross bypass project for the layperson is as dizzying as its bridge over the River Barrow is going to be high.

For starters, the Killkenny People writes the scheme is 26 years in the making - from its humble beginnings in Kilkenny and Wexford County Development Plans in 1993 and 1994 for an additional river crossing around New Ross.

So to begin with, getting the project over the line took decades in terms of route selection, bridge options, an oral hearing, scheme approval, design, Compulsory Purchase Orders, tendering and all that an infrastructural development of this size entails.

Then there’s the task constructing 13.6km of dual carriageway which will boast Ireland’s longest bridge once it is completed.

For further reading on this impressive project, click here. 

Published in Inland Waterways

#TerminalSite - The Port of New Ross on the River Barrow, has been a hub for dry and liquid bulk traffic and project cargoes for many years. In 2015, total trade through the Co. Wexford port exceeded 286,000 tonnes.

In order to optimise the use of existing port infrastructure, the port company wishes to dispose of a terminal within the port estate, which is situated in the townland of Marshmeadows, downriver of New Ross.

On behalf of the port company, the Marine Institute is inviting expressions of interest in acquiring the facility. The terminal comprises a jetty and adjoining lands measuring approximately 2 hectares.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#RIVER FESTIVAL – The inland port of New Ross,Co. Wexford, is to where the Celtic River Festival is to take place over next weekend (25-26 Aug).

The festival has an action packed programme to entertain with plenty of fun-filled activities for all to enjoy. The events are a cruiser treasure hunt, Viking longboat trips, cot-racing, music sessions, Viking camp and medieval fair, a kids workshop and sea scout camp and archery.

For further details visit their facebook page by clicking HERE

Published in Maritime Festivals

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020