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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Ringsend Wastewater Treatment Plant.

#DUBLIN BAY RIGS – The jack-up rig Excalibur returned to Dublin Bay yesterday, having previously carried out preliminary bore test-site drilling work last year for a new sewage pipeline. As reported last year the sight of several floating structures gave the distinct impression that oil had been struck and again the presence of the rig's purpose is further from true with no such oil-exploratory activity taking place, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The rig is in Dublin Bay for several weeks and is to carry out further site investigation to ascertain the most suitable route of a new under the seabed laid sewage pipeline for the €220m Dublin Bay Project, where the principle contractor for the project is Fugro Seacore.

According to Dublin City Council, the impact of the new outfall location on the outer fringe of Dublin Bay will be 'localised'. They also claim that the project is to further improve water quality in Dublin Bay. Under the terms of the waste-water discharge license issued by the EPA, the pipeline must be completed by 2015.

Currently wastewater is discharged at Ringsend where the the Wastewater Treatment Plant in processes a 1.9m population equivalent. The new outfall pipe and associated works is to address increased demand and will be able to increase the capacity to a 2.1m population equivalent.

The Excalibur was towed from Holyhead by the tug MTS Valiant, to a position close to the Dublin Bay Buoy, the primary navigational mark which acts a 'round-about' for shipping using Dublin Port. The Excalibur is essentially a large barge with several sea-legs than can be lowered onto the seabed, where upon the barge itself rests while hoisted above the waterline.

On board is a crane, porta-cabin like facilities for crew, a service workboat and a lifeboat. During the construction process there will be a guard-boat which will monitor other shipping activity, as a safety precaution. One of the first vessels to pass Excalibur was the 113,000 tonnes giant cruiseship Carribean Princess which edged cautiously by while outward bound yesterday for Belfast.

The treatment plant in Ringsend was built in 2003, in which the superior plant replaced an older facility closer to the Poolbeg Harbour at the foot of the now disused ESB Power Station. Up until then, two-thirds of the greater Dublin region was treated but only at this primary level where 60% of waster-water went straight through the facility into the Liffey, the balance of 40% had polluntants removed to form sludge which was disposed out at sea.

This uneviable of tasks was performed by the wastewater disposal vessel Sir Joseph Bazalgette (1963/2,258grt) which saw some 40m gallons discharged into the spoiling grounds off Dublin Bay and Kish Lighthouse.

The former London County Council commissioned vessel worked on the Thames until sold to Dublin Corporation. On occasions she would head back to port via a transit of Dalkey Sound.

Despite her sale to overseas buyers in 1999, she remains one of the largest vessel's in modern times to make a passage of the sound that marks the southern approaches to Dublin Bay.

Published in Dublin Bay
A jack-up rig barge has been positioned off the South Wall, Dublin Port, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The barge is contracted to Dublin City Council for the drilling of test boreholes in the approaches to and within Dublin Bay in relation to the Ringsend Wastewater Treatment Plant. Both jack-up barges 'Aran 250' and 'Excalibur' will be operating on a 24-hour / 7 days per week basis.

In attendence Sea Safari Tours RIB 'James Joyce', which normally operates as a tourist-sightseeing craft will act as a stanby boat during the rig operations. In addition a buoy will be positioned 300-metres of the barge during drill operations, which is expected to take approximately one week for each drill.

The project will also see the tug, Trojan providing supplies and to tow the jack-up rigs between locations in Dublin Bay. Both the James Joyce and the Trojan will be based out of the Poolbeg Marina, in the centre of the port.

Since the start of October, the project has also required the services of the yellow-hulled catamaran, Xplorer to carry out a bathymetric survey of Dublin Bay.

For further detailed information, please consult Notices to Mariners (No. 14 and 15) listed on the Dublin Port Company website by logging onto this link: http://www.dublinport.ie/information-centre/notice-to-mariners/

In addition to www.dublincity.ie

Published in Dublin Bay
An underwater survey of Dublin Bay is expected to commence this Friday, (1st October 2010). It is part of a Dublin City Council (DCC) project to upgrade the Ringsend Wastewater Treatment Plant. Preliminary works will include a Bathymetric Survey of Dublin Bay and its approaches and last for a period of approximately one month. The area to be surveyed is attached in a Notice to Mariners issued by Dublin Port Company. The survey will be carried out by a 12 metre yellow hull catamaran "Xplorer". The "Xplorer" is fitted with A.I.S.

 

Published in Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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