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Displaying items by tag: Royal Cork Yacht Club

The Royal Cork Yacht Club fleet is gathering for this morning's club tricentenary celebration in Cork Harbour.

A parade of sail past Haulbowline Island, where the oldest yacht club in the world was founded in 1720, is being held.  It will be followed by two days of 'At Home' racing.

RCYC is holding its deferred Tricentenary Regatta today and tomorrow.

It will start with a parade of sail and motor off Haulbowline Island on Saturday, which was the first location of the Waterboys Club of Cork in 1720, from which the present RCYC evolved to become the oldest yacht club in the world.

Original Tricentenary plans had to be postponed due to the Covid pandemic.

Special trophies have been commissioned for the Regatta. "As always, the At Home' is open to members of visiting clubs," says the RCYC.

The Tricentenary sailing programme is here.

More here from Afloat's W M Nixon this morning, and check back for photos from Afloat's Bob Bateman as celebrations unfold on Afloat's dedicated Cork300 section here.

Published in Cork300

Despite a big effort to complete a full schedule of races completed at the AIB Irish Laser Championships at Royal Cork, only very light winds meant no races were held yesterday bringing to two of four days of racing lost due to too much wind or lack of it in Cork Harbour.

After eight races sailed, locals won two of three divisions in the 99-boat fleet.

Cork Harbour's Nick Walsh topped a 14-boat standard fleet with a 12-point lead over clubmate Edward Rice and Robert Howe of Monkstown Bay third.

RCYC's Jonathan O'Shaughnessy won the 49-boat Radial division. Second was Harry Pritchard and third Elle Cunnane, both from Royal Cork.

A 35-boat 4/7 fleet was led from start to finish by Howth Yacht Club's Rocco Wright with an 11 point margin from Royal Cork's Oisin MacSweeney. Wright's clubmate Luke Turvey was third.

Full photo gallery of prizewinners below by Bob Bateman

Overall results are here

Rocco Wright, Winner of the 4.7 divisionRocco Wright, Winner of the 4.7 division receives his prize from Admiral Colin Morehead RCYC. Picture Robert Bateman

Oisin Mac Sweeney runner up in the AIB Laser Nationals 4.7 ClassOisin MacSweeney 4.7 runner up

Luke TurveyLuke Turvey third in the 4.7 division

Jonathan O'Shaughhnessy winner of the Radial fleetJonathan O'Shaughnessy winner of the Radial fleet

Harry Pritchard Harry Pritchard, second in the Radial 

Elle Cunnane TBSC/RCYC 1st Lady and 3rd in the 4.7s overallElle Cunnane TBSC/RCYC 1st Lady and 3rd in the Radials overall

A happy Moment. Nick Walsh winner Standard rig with his Father, yachtsman Bill Walsh with Admiral Colin MoreheadA happy Moment. Nick Walsh winner Standard rig with his Father, yachtsman Bill Walsh with Admiral Colin Morehead

Ed Rice, runner up in the standard rig divisionEd Rice, runner up in the standard rig division

Robert HoweRobert Howe, third in the Standard Rig

Dorothy Matthews, First local girlDorothy Matthews, First local girl

Irish Laser Championships Prizegiving Photo Gallery by Bob Bateman

Published in Laser

Friday's fleet leaders continue at the top in two of three divisions of the AIB sponsored Laser National Championships at Royal Cork Yacht Club, going into the final day of competition in Cork Harbour.

After eight races sailed, 99 boats compete across the three fleets at Crosshaven, with locals leading two divisions.

Eleven Races under London Olympic Race Officer Jack Roy were scheduled, with the final races sailed this Sunday.

Cork Harbour's Nick Walsh leads a 14-boat standard fleet with a 12-point lead over clubmate Edward Rice. Monkstown Bay's Robert Howe is third.

The host club has a grip on the biggest fleet of the championships, with RCYC youths filling the top three places in the Radial class. However, two UFD penalties have ruined one-time leader Michael Crosbie's perfect scoresheet with clubmate Jonathan O'Shaughnessy now on top of the 49 boat division.

Nick Walsh has a 12 point lead in the standard division Photo: Bob BatemanNick Walsh has a 12 point lead in the standard division Photo: Bob Bateman

After some intense competition at Dun Laoghaire Harbour during last week's 4.7 Youth World Championships on Dublin Bay, a 35-boat fleet is back on the water again, and it continues to be led by Howth Yacht Club's Rocco Wright now with an 11 point margin from Royal Cork's Oisin MacSweeney. Wright's clubmate Luke Turvey stays third.

Racing continues at Royal Cork this morning and conditions are expected to be light with winds under ten knots from the south.

Overall results are here

Published in Laser

Leaders have made perfect starts to the AIB sponsored Laser National Championships at Royal Cork Yacht Club recording four straight wins in all three divisions.

99 boats are competing across the three fleets at Crosshaven in Cork Harbour with locals leading two divisions.

Due to the pandemic, no national championship event was sailed in 2020, with the last nationals being sailed in 2019 in Ballyholme in Northern Ireland.

Eleven Races under London Olympic Race Officer Jack Roy are scheduled. Races 4, 5 and 6 today (Friday) and Saturday Races 7, 8 and 9. Two final races are scheduled on Sunday 22. 

Southerly winds gusting to 30 knots are due later today (with a two-hour postponement already in place this Friday morning) with winds forecast to moderate for both Saturday and Sunday.

If conditions improve on Friday, the plan is to try and get two races in at White Bay just inside Roches Point.

Walsh leads Standard Rigs

Cork Harbour local Nick Walsh leads a 14-boat standard fleet. Royal St. George's Finn Walker from Dun Laoghaire is second on 13 points with another Cork Harbour sailor, Robert Howe in third place a point behind on 14. 

Nick Walsh in the lead in the standard rigNick Walsh in the lead in the standard rig Photo: Bob Bateman

Crosbie on form in Radial

The host club has a grip on the biggest fleet of the championships with RCYC youths filling the top three places in the Radial class. Michael Crosbie leads on four points from Jonathan O'Shaughnessy on 11 points. Third is Harry Pritchard on 16.

Michael Crosbie leads the RadialsMichael Crosbie leads the Radials Photo: Bob Bateman

Wright at top of 4.7s

After some intense competition at Dun Laoghaire Harbour during last week's 4.7 Youth World Championships on Dublin Bay, a 35-boat fleet is back on the water again and led by Howth Yacht Club's Rocco Wright on 4 points from Royal Cork's Oisin Mac Sweeney on nine.  Wright's clubmate Luke Turvey is third on 11.0

Howth Yacht Club's Rocco Wright Howth Yacht Club's Rocco Wright Photo: Bob Bateman

Racing continues at Royal Cork today

Overall results are here

RCYC Laser Nationals Day One Photo Gallery by Bob Bateman

 

Published in Laser

ZeroDark, the big black high-speed RIB driven by Royal Cork member John Ryan, broke his own existing Cork Fastnet Cork speed record in a time of 1 hour, 47 minutes and 7 seconds (Subject to ratification by UIM) yesterday.

The previous record of 2 hours 6 minutes and 47 seconds was set by Ryan when he was team principal of All Black Racing in 2018 as Afloat reported here.

This week, as regular Afloat readers will know, the boat had been turning heads on test runs with its impressive speed around Cork Harbour.

Speaking after the record run, John said “we were delighted to be able to break the existing record and while conditions proved challenging in the latter stages I am really pleased how the boat handled the conditions”. He also paid tribute to his navigator on the day, Ciaran Monks, no stranger to high-speed craft.

Zerodark RIB team(Above and below) The Zerodark RIB team prepare for the record at RCYC marina

Zerodark RIB team

Zerodark RIB team

Fastnet Rock - the halfway point on a perfect evening for a high speed Rib runFastnet Rock - the halfway point on a perfect evening for a high speed Rib run

Ryan told Afloat his top speed during the run was 83 knots, but that he lost navigation and all instruments due to an electrical issue after ten minutes from start so the run was by compass only with no trim or engine management. The average speed was 65 knots.

The record time of 1 hour, 47 minutes and 7 seconds is subject to ratification by UIM record keepersThe record time of 1 hour, 47 minutes and 7 seconds is subject to ratification by UIM record keepers

Colin Morehead, Admiral of the Royal Cork who was assisting the record bid commented – It is great to see John, a member of our club achieving such results today. The yacht club has a strong motor history and it is wonderful to see John and his team perform so admirably today. It was my pleasure to provide him with a special five-gun salute on their victorious return to the yacht club marina this evening”

Record breakers - celebrating at Royal Cork Yacht Club marina after the record time was set, John Ryan (right)and Colin Morehead  (second from right) and the Zerodark team(above and below) Record breakers - celebrating at Royal Cork Yacht Club marina after the record time was set, John Ryan (right)and Colin Morehead (second from right) and the Zerodark team Photo: Bob Bateman

Zerodark RIB team

ZeroDark was built by Ophardt Maritim in Duisburg, Germany and she arrived by road earlier this week. Designed by Andrew Lee of Norson Design specifically for the German Special Forces as a craft to be utilized for high-speed covert operations.

She has an aluminium hull and is the fastest of its type in the world and can reach speeds in excess of 85 knots.

 Ryan says Zerodark will be attempting further records in near future.

Zerodark Cork-Fastnet-Cork Record Run Photo Gallery

Published in Royal Cork YC
Tagged under

A strong fleet of over 100 boats is expected to contest the 2021 Laser National championships which start on Thursday, 19th August at Royal Cork Yacht Club.

The ILCA 6 (Radial) fleet has attracted over 50 registrations, with 35 signed up in the ILCA 4 fleet and around 20 in the ILCA 7 (standard) fleet.

The Cork Harbour event immediately follows the Laser 4.7 (ILCA 4) Youth World Championships on Dublin Bay last week. 

Due to the pandemic, no national championship event was sailed in 2020, with the last nationals being sailed in 2019 in Ballyholme in Northern Ireland.

Michael Crosbie, who won in the ILCA 4 fleet in 2019 has moved up to the ILCA 6 fleet and will be looking to make his mark this year. Recent experience at international events will stand him in good stead.

In 2019, Ellie Cunnane placed 2nd female in the ILCA 6 fleet and after two years of intensive training and international racing, her eyes are on the podium this week.

Event registration will be on Wednesday 18th August between 15:00 and 18:00 and Thursday 19th between 09:00 and 10:30.

The sailors briefing will be done virtually via zoom, with the link available on the RCYC website. The first race is scheduled for Thursday 19th August at midday, with start times one hour earlier at 11:00 am on the subsequent three days.

Published in Laser

1720 sportsboat champion Robert O'Leary and the Dutch Gold crew from West Cork successfully defended their national title today with a domination of the 20-boat sportsboat fleet in Cork Harbour.

O'Leary took five wins from six starts and did not need to sail the final race this afternoon at Royal Cork Yacht Club.

Baltimore Sailing Club clubmate Fionn Lyden sailing Spiced Beef finished second overall on 25 points, some 13 points behind O'Leary.

Howth's Dan O'Grady took third place on 30 points sailing Wet & Black.

The impressive sportsboat fleet was made up largely of south cost boats; five from Baltimore, five from Waterford Harbour, eight from Royal Cork and two from the east coast at Howth. 

The event serves as a useful warm-up for the fleet's Europeans Championships on 23rd September at Waterford Harbour Sailing Club.

Howth's Dan O'Grady took third place on 30 points sailing Wet & BlackHowth's Dan O'Grady took third place on 30 points sailing Wet & Black Photo: Bob Bateman

For a 1720 day one photo gallery click here. See the day three gallery below.

Results are here

Day 3 1720 National Championships Photo Gallery By Bateman below

Published in 1720

Jerry Dowling's SB20 from the Royal Irish Yacht Club leads a nine-boat class Southern Championships at Royal Cork Yacht Club from Aidan McSweeney's host club entry, Gold Digger. 

Four of the sportsboats have travelled from Dun Laoghaire Harbour (the venue for the 2022 World Championships) and two from Lough Ree for the weekend event in Cork Harbour, but the top boat Ted skippered by Michael O'Connor is not competing.

In third place is Dowling's clubmates, Colin Galavan and Richard Hayes in Carpe Diem.

Racing continues today.

Results are here

Published in SB20

Defending 1720 sportsboat champion Robert O'Leary and the Dutch Gold crew from West Cork are stamping their authority on a 20-boat National Championship fleet after five races sailed at Royal Cork Yacht Club.

After one discard, O'Leary has built on his day one lead and sits on four nett points, 11 points clear of Baltimore Sailing Club clubmate Fionn Lyden sailing Spiced Beef on 15 points.

Howth's Ross McDonald in RopeDoc Atara is on the same points in third place. 

The impressive sportsboat fleet is made up largely of south cost boats; five from Baltimore, five from Waterford Harbour, eight from Royal Cork and two from the east coast at Howth. 

Racing continues in Cork Harbour today. For a 1720 Day One photo gallery click here

Results are here

Published in 1720

Two race wins put Robert O'Leary top of the 20-boat 1720 National Championships at Royal Cork Yacht Club after two races sailed in Cork Harbour.

Westerly winds of 18 to 20 knots got the championships off to a great start even though it took three attempts to get the fleet started on the first race.

Racing was held on the Harbour's eastern bank, the ebb tide from East Ferry pushing the fleet up to the startline.

Lying second overall is the recent winner of the East coast Championships, Ross McDonald's Atara from Howth Yacht Club who counts a 3 and a 5.

Third is Baltimore Sailing Club entry Livewire on nine points.

Racing continues tomorrow when the 1720s will be joined by the SB20s who race for southern championship honours.

Results are here

Day One 1720 National Championships Photo Gallery 

Published in 1720
Page 9 of 58

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020