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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Salthill

#MarineWildlife - Young and old alike are invited to join a 'beach safari' from the lifeguard hut Grattan Beach in Salthill at 11.30am on Sunday 26 May, ahead of the first Galway Sea Festival.

Marine wildlife experts such as Amy Lusher of GMIT's Marine and Freshwater Research Centre and Dr Nóirín Burke of the Galway Atlantaquaria will be on hand to provide insights into an often ignored world of plants and animals, as the Galway Independent reports.

“The shore can sometimes appear to be devoid of wildlife, but when you start to look closely, there is a wonderful amount of activity going on - in the sand, under the rocks and in the rock pools," said Dr Burke.

“Grattan Beach is such an amazing resource to have on our doorstep here in Galway. Just a few hundred metres from the footpath where people walk and jog you can enter a habitat where life is completely different from our own."

A further chance to discover more about this secret world of the marine habitat will be available at the Galway Atlantaquaria's 'Family Funday' on 2 June in conjunction with the city's Galway Sea Festival celebrations.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, "tens of thousands" of visitors are expected to flock to the City of the Tribes for the first Galway Sea Festival from 31 May till 3 June over the June bank holiday weekend.

Published in Marine Wildlife

#AnTostal - Galway's An Tostál maritime festival will take place on 26 May after strong winds forced the postponement of the originally scheduled date last Sunday, according to the Galway Independent.

Cian O’Lorcáin of the organisers said the decision to delay the event was made "for the benefit of water safety. We were really thinking of the crews on the water because, with the winds, it could have proved hazardous...

"Safety is the number one thing for us so when that couldn't be guaranteed, we decided to postpone."

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the festival - reactivated in 2011 after a 50-year gap - celebrates Galway's maritime traditions with currach racing along the Salthill promenade. This year's event is also set to feature a Galway Hooker parade of sail.

Published in Maritime Festivals

#Property - A mid-Georgian country house on 50 acres in Co Carlow with its own angler's chalet on the River Slaney is attracting much attention from overseas for its knock-down price.

The Irish Times is singing the praises of Ballynoe House, a two-storey home with seven bedrooms and various additional outbuildings set in "beautiful parkland with good pasturage" - perfect for its owners Willem and Anneke Savelkouls who bred horses and kept sheep on the land.

The house itself comprises 850 sqm of floor space, the ground floor featuring a sizeable reception hall plus two high-ceilinged reception rooms with large windows, an open plan kitchen/living area and a study.

Upstairs can be found a master suite, five family bedrooms sharing two bathrooms and a guest suite with shower. Another bedroom is located in the basement, which features a games room, wine cellar, office space and a housekeeper's apartment.

Outside, the walled garden at the rear includes a swimming pool and pavilion added by noted architect Sam Stephenson when he was a resident in the 1970s, as well as a disused tennis court that a resurfacing would bring bang up to shape.

One big selling point is the property's prime waterfront location along a 2km stretch of the River Slaney, providing for some top-class salmon and trout angling.

Previously on the market for almost €4 million, Ballynoe House today is a snap for all you'll get at an asking price of just €1.24 million.

Viewing is by appointment only with agents Sherry FitzGerald. The Irish Times has more on the property HERE.

On the slightly more modest end of the scale, Collerans Auctioneers in Galway are handing the sale of 114 Ocean Wave in Salthill, a four-bed detached home close to the famous promenade for €460,000.

According to the Galway Advertiser, the house offers "beautiful views" of Galway Bay from the master bedroom on the first floor (completed by three en-suites).

On the ground floor, generous living and office space plus separate entrances lend the property to use as a GP practice or similar.

Published in Waterfront Property

#GalwayBay - Funding issues have resulted in the cancellation of what would have been the third annual Ironman 70.3 triathlon in Galway later this year, as the Galway City Tribune reports.

Organisers have expressed their sorrow at having to call a halt to the event, which already had some 1,600 people registered to take part, due to what they claim is a lack of funding from Fáilte Ireland.

“I think it’s ironic that we have to turn people away when ‘The Gathering’ is on,” said co-organiser Eoin McCormack.

The most recent Galway Ironman 70.3, staged in August 2012, overcame local swimming ban concerns to see more than 2,000 athletes swim 1.9km along the Salthill Promenade before a 90km cycle through Connemara and a 21.1km run through the streets of Salthill and The Claddagh.

It's estimated that the inaugural event in 2011 was worth more than €10 million to the local economy.

The Galway City Tribune has more on the story HERE.

Published in Galway Harbour
21st September 2012

Wildlife Beach Walk in Salthill

#MARINE WILDLIFE - The Irish Wildlife Trust teams with the Galway Atlantaquaria to host a wildlife walk on Grattan Beach in Salthill tomorrow Saturday 22 September.

Starting at 3.30pm at the lifeguard hut, the free walk will look at the plants and wildlife found in seashore habitats on Galway Bay and around the west coast of Ireland.

Families are especially welcome, and nets and buckets will be provided for adults and children alike to explore the rock pools.

Staff from the Atlantaquaria will be taking along a selection of sea life from their undersea bounty.

And it might also be worth taking the opportunity to get involved in Coastwatch's ongoing 'eco audit' of the Irish shoreline, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

The Galway Independent has more on the story HERE.

Published in Marine Wildlife

#ANGLING - The Irish Fly Fair and International Angling Show returns to the Galway Bay Hotel in Salthill this November for the third year running.

As the Galway Independent reports, the show will run over the weekend of 10-11 November from 10am to 5pm daily featuring a wide range of exhibitors and trade stands.

Sixty of the world's greatest fly tyers will be on hand to give their advice in the new fly-dressers' workshop.

And angling personalities such as Hywel Morgan, Glenda Powell, Peter O'Reilly, Stevie Munn and Paddy McDonnell will return to give their helpful angling clinics and fly-casting demonstrations.

Meanwhile, younger anglers will have another chance to give the pros a run for their money in the second youth fly tying competition run by APGAI Ireland.

More details on the weekend will be forthcoming on www.irishflyfair.com.

Published in Angling

#GALWAY BAY - Galway City Council lifted the swimming ban on Salthill at the weekend, clearing the way for the upcoming Ironman 70.3 triathlon in the City of the Tribes.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, concerns had been raised about the Galway beach closure last week resulting from elevated levels of E.coli above the EU's mandatory safety theshold.

But subsequent testing showed that levels had returned to below the safe limit, and Galway Bay FM reports that a second test confirmed that E.coli presence was "well below" permitted values.

Despite the bathing ban on Grattan Beach, triathlon organisers were confident that the event would "not be impacted".

According to the Galway Advertiser, some 2,500 particpants are registered to compete in the Ironman 70.3 triathlon this Sunday 2 September.

The second annual race comprises a 1.9km swim along the Salthill Promenade, a 90km cycle through Connemara and a 21.1km run through the streets of Salthill and The Claddagh.

As many as 25,000 visitors are expected in what marks another tourism boost for Galway, following on the heels of the Volvo Ocean Race finale last month.

Published in Galway Harbour

#GALWAY BAY - Organisers of the Ironman 70.3 triathlon in Galway next weekend have given assurances that no competitors are at risk from E.coli contamination - despite concerns over elevated levels of the bacteria in Galway Bay.

The Evening Herald reports that E.coli levels in the waters off Salthill were recently found to have exceeded the EU mandatory safety threshold - similar to that which saw seven beaches closed in Cork last week, as well as Rush South in Dublin over the August bank holiday weekend.

Subsequent testing showed that levels had dropped below the safe limit, and Galway City Council was yesterday expecting a second set of results which, if positive, would see the beach at Salthill reopened to bathing.

The swim portion of the Ironman triathlon on Sunday 2 September will take a route along the Salthill Promeade from Blackrock to Palmer's Rock, and organisers say they are happy that the event "will not be impacted" by the current concerns.

"We are at the far end of the bay. The event is still eight... days away and this won't affect us in the least," said organiser Eoin McCormack.

A number of Irish celebrities will be taking part in the second annual Ironman 70.3 Galway event.

Rosanna Davison, Kathryn Thimas, Keith Duffy, Ray D'Arcy and Gráinne and Síle Seoige will be among those tacking the gruelling course that includes a 1.9km swim, a 90km bike ride and a run through the Salthill and Claddagh areas of Galway City.

The Evening Herald has more on the story HERE.

Published in Galway Harbour

#ANGLING - The Irish Angling Development Alliance (IADA) is running a series of biosecurity awareness evenings at venues across Ireland over the next two months.

The evenings follow from the "success" of the IADA's awareness section at the recent Ireland Angling Show, and will provide an opportunity for more people to "meet with experts in the field and see what invasive species are first-hand".

Three events, in association with Inland Fisheries Ireland, are scheduled:

  • 27 March at the Wetlands Centre, Ballybay, Co Monagahan (hosted by the Ballybay Angling Association)
  • 18 April at the Cavan Crystal Hotel, Cavan (hosted by the Cavan Anglers Club)
  • 23 May at the Salthill Hotel in Salthill, Galway (hosted by the Galway CAC)

All events run from 7:30pm till 9pm. Admission is free and all are welcome.

For more information contact Peter Walsh at [email protected]

Published in Angling

#RESCUE - BreakingNews.ie reports that two men have been rescued from a sinking fishing boat in Galway Bay this afternoon.

One of the two men on board the vessel alerted rescue services around 2pm after they began taking on water close to Salthill west of the city.

Two other fishing boats aided the duo before the Galway RNLI lifeboat crew boarded the vessel and used a pump to keep it afloat.

The stricken boat has since been towed back to the city docks.

Published in Rescue
Page 2 of 3

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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