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Displaying items by tag: Sean Kelly MEP

Seán Kelly MEP has this week been appointed to the European Parliament's Committee on Fisheries.

The Ireland South MEP, is Ireland's only Member of the International Trade Committee, which will complement his latest appointment: "Ireland exports seafood to 80 countries worldwide and is renowned for quality produce, particularly in terms of the organic market.

"The EU market itself is very important for Ireland, but what is most promising is the rise in exports to Asia. Irish seafood exports to Asia are now valued at €15 billion and Chinese demand for seafood is on the rise. I see great opportunities for the Irish fishing fleet there. Of course, 2017 begins on a positive note for Ireland which has some 233,500 tonnes of quota this year, valued at €280 million to the industry, representing a 6 percent rise in quota compared to last year, as confirmed just last month.

"As the EU examines future trade policy, it is vital that policymakers are aware of what sectors can benefit from maximising which trade agreements. My membership of both the International Trade and Fisheries Committee of Parliament will ensure Ireland's voice is strong on such issues," Mr Kelly said in Brussels today.

"Ireland also has a solid reptutation for innovation including in the marine sector which I have highlighted on numerous occasions at EU level. Just last year I hosted a delegation of MEPs and policymakers belonging to the Industry, Research and Energy Committee on a visit to Cork, where we visited the Marine Renewable Energy Ireland (MaREI) marine and energy- based research to hear about the potential of wave energy at University College Cork. The facility's deep water basin is capable of generating wave heights of up to 1.1m, which means Ireland is at the forefront in testing wave energy devices."

Ireland benefited from EU funding for marine research an innovation with some €5.5 million in EU Horizon 2020 funding secured for Irish projects and marine researchers. Mr Kelly added that Ireland must continue to support its ocean economy including marine tourism entreprises.

Published in Fishing
Tagged under

"Ireland will be one of the hardest-hit countries in Europe and suffer more coastal and river flooding incidents in future, if a deal to limit global warming is not achieved in Paris," said Seán Kelly MEP, a member of the European Parliament's negotiating team at the UN's Global Climate Change Conference in Paris this evening (Thursday).

"Unfortunately, many families in Ireland are once again dealing with the terrible consequences of flood damage to homes, farms and businesses. This is a consequence of climate change which will become a more frequent occurrence in future if we do not take urgent action to lower carbon emissions," he said.

The Ireland South MEP told fellow negotiators in Paris that Ireland is particularly vulnerable to flooding because of high rainfall levels and our Atlantic location.

Mr Kelly further cited last year's study by the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission which examined the possible future Climate Change effects if the global temperature rises by 3.5 degrees Celsius.

"Currently, flooding currently affects 160,000 people in Europe every year but the JRC study revealed that that number could increase to 290,000 in future.

"Across all sectors, Climate Change is causing 190 billion euros worth of damage in the EU annually. But the experts predict that figure could double if no action is taken. It is estimated that flood damage alone could account for €10 billion."

"The message is clear. If current global warming continues unabated, Ireland and the rest of the world will suffer from more flooding incidents. That is why we are here in Paris, pressing our global counterparts to compromise and agree on a deal.

"I believe a deal can be done to prevent this kind of nightmare future. Prevention is better than the cure - the amount of money we spend to repair the damages caused by the effects of Climate Change are far greater than what we could invest now in clean technologies and energy infrastructure that accommodates high share of renewables and so on.

"Reducing emissions now can save our environment, prevent unprecedented levels of damage, like that of the flooding witnessed in Ireland in recent days, and save lives in some cases," Mr Kelly continued.

Published in News Update
Writing in the Irish Examiner yesterday, Donal Hickey points Ireland's tourism authorities towards our abundant marine wildlife as a draw for potential visitors.
Hickey makes note of the "multi-million euro industry" built up around Fungie the dolphin in Dingle and eco-tours to see bird colonies on the Blasket Islands as examples of the kind of business that could be developed around Ireland's coastline.
He also hails "on-the-ball" Munster MEP Sean Kelly, who "did not have to look outside his own constituency to highlight the wonders of the sea shore, glorious beaches, deep-sea angling in east Cork, whale watching in west Cork, surfing along the beautiful beaches of Kerry and Clare."
The Atlantic Area Strategy that Kelly debated at the European Parliament could encourage greater enterepreneurship in the marine tourism sector and co-operation with other European maritime nations, Hickey writes.
The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

Writing in the Irish Examiner yesterday, Donal Hickey points Ireland's tourism authorities towards our abundant marine wildlife as a draw for potential visitors.

Hickey makes note of the "multi-million euro industry" built up around Fungie the dolphin in Dingle and eco-tours to see bird colonies on the Blasket Islands as examples of the kind of business that could be developed around Ireland's coastline.

He also hails "on-the-ball" Munster MEP Sean Kelly, who "did not have to look outside his own constituency to highlight the wonders of the sea shore, glorious beaches, deep-sea angling in east Cork, whale watching in west Cork, surfing along the beautiful beaches of Kerry and Clare."

The Atlantic Area Strategy that Kelly debated at the European Parliament could encourage greater enterepreneurship in the marine tourism sector and co-operation with other European maritime nations, Hickey writes.

The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

Published in Aquatic Tourism
An Irish MEP has urged the new Government to exploit the "endless possibilities" of marine tourism in Ireland.
Speaking at the European Parliament in Strasbourg earlier this week, Sean Kelly MEP said: "“My own constituency of Ireland South alone boasts a huge array of tourist attractions along the sea shore. Deep-sea and river angling in East Cork, whale-watching in West Cork, surfing along the beautiful beaches of Kerry."
Kelly argued that the draft Atlantic Area Strategy - designed to facilitate greater economic co-operation between coastal countries in western Europe - would encourage new business start-ups in popular water sports such as surfing and other coastline activities.
"I would like to see more surfing competitions, marine festivals and a determined marketing campaign to attract international visitors to the region," he said, adding that tourism bodies in Ireland and the UK specifically should work together on a joint action plan.
“The whole island of Ireland should reap the rewards of having one of Europe’s best coastlines for water sports and marine tourism," said Kelly.

An Irish MEP has urged the new Government to exploit the "endless possibilities" of marine tourism in Ireland.

Speaking at the European Parliament in Strasbourg earlier this week, Sean Kelly MEP said: “My own constituency of Ireland South alone boasts a huge array of tourist attractions along the sea shore. Deep-sea and river angling in East Cork, whale-watching in West Cork, surfing along the beautiful beaches of Kerry."

Kelly argued that the draft Atlantic Area Strategy - designed to facilitate greater economic co-operation between coastal countries in western Europe - would encourage new business start-ups in popular water sports such as surfing and other coastline activities.

"I would like to see more surfing competitions, marine festivals and a determined marketing campaign to attract international visitors to the region," he said, adding that tourism bodies in Ireland and the UK specifically should work together on a joint action plan.

“The whole island of Ireland should reap the rewards of having one of Europe’s best coastlines for water sports and marine tourism," said Kelly.

Published in Coastal Notes

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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