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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Shannon Navigation

MARINE NOTICE

No 61 of 2013

SHANNON NAVIGATION

Athlone

Shannon Swim

Waterways Ireland wishes to advise masters and users of the Shannon Navigation that the "Shannon Swim" event will take place in Athlone on Sat 22 nd . June between 1800 hrs and 2000hrs.

The start of the swimming course will be in the vicinity of the Athlone By-Pass (M6) Bridge and will proceed down river to the Athlone Town Bridge.

Masters are requested to proceed at slow speed and with minimum wash when in this area of the navigation and to note any advice given by race marshals and safety boat crew when approaching the course.

Waterways Ireland thanks masters for their co-operation in this matter.

C.J.Lawn
Lt Cdr (rtd)
Inspector of Navigation

13 Jun 2013
Tel: 353 90 6494232
Fax: 353 90 6494147

Published in Inland Waterways
Tagged under

MARINE NOTICE

No. 61 of 2013

SHANNON NAVIGATION

Limerick

Sarsfield's Lock

Navigation Restriction

Marine Notice No 58 is now withdrawn.

C.Lawn
Inspector of Navigation
14 Jun 2013
Tel: 00 353 (0)90 6494232
Fax : 00 353 (0) 6494147

Published in Inland Waterways
Tagged under

MARINE NOTICE

No 55 of 2013

SHANNON NAVIGATION

Lough Ree - Killinure Lough

Athlone Boat Club Regatta

Mooring Restrictions at Coosan Pt. Lough Ree

Marine Notice No. 45 of 2013 refers.

Masters are advised that the southern half of Coosan Point moorings will closed to berthing vessels from noon on Fri 14 th until 2100 hrs on Sat 15 th Jun.

This restriction is for safety reasons as the rowing course finishing line is adjacent to the moorings and manoeuvring vessels will pose a hazard.

Waterways Ireland thanks masters for their co-operation in this matter.

C.J.Lawn

Lt Cdr (rtd)

Inspector of Navigation

10 Jun 2013

Tel: 353 90 6494232

Fax: 353 90 6494147


Published in Inland Waterways
Tagged under

#InlandWaterways - Waterways Ireland is advising masters and users of the Shannon Navigation that a triathlon event will take place on Saturday 8 June in the environs of Portrunny Harbour.

The swimming course will be laid out adjacent to the moorings in the harbour, and will be active from 11.30am till 1pm on the day.

Swimmers on the course will be accompanied by a safety boat and kayaks.

Masters are requested to give the swimmers a wide berth and to navigate at slow speed and with a low wash when passing the area, and to heed any instructions or advice given by the event marshals.

Published in Inland Waterways

#shannonnavigation – Works to upgrade the floating moorings at Acres Lake, Drumshanbo on the Shannon navigation will commence 16th April 2013.

There is no access permitted to the floating moorings, by land or water, during the upgrade works which are due to be complete by 3rd May 2013.

Waterways Ireland says it apologises for any inconvenience caused during these works and advises that alternative mooring facilities are close by at Drumshanbo Lock.

Published in Inland Waterways
Tagged under

#InlandWaterways - Waterways Ireland wishes to advise masters and owners of vessels and boats on the Shannon Navigation that Sarsfield’s Lock in Limerick will be operated on restricted service from Thursday 28 February to Saturday 9 March 2013.

During this time the lock will only operate from 10am to 12.30pm daily.

Masters and owners are requested to ring the lockkeeper at 087 797 2998 one day prior to making their passage.

Published in Inland Waterways

#InlandWaterways - Waterways Ireland wishes to advise masters and owners on the Shannon Navigation that work will commence on the lock gates at Tarmonbarry Lock next Monday 14 January.

These works will be on-going for a period of approximately eight weeks until Thursday 14 March 2013. An alternative passage maybe accessed via the Camlin river loop upstream of Tarmonbarry Lock and the Clondra Canal downstream of the lock.

The cross-border body for Ireland's inland waterways also advises that the Carrick-on-Shannon Rowing Club's Head of River race will take place on Saturday 23 February from 9am till 5pm.

Masters of vessels are requested to proceed at slow speed and with minimum wash when passing this stretch of the navigation and to heed any advice or instructions issued by the regatta officials.

Meanwhile, Waterways Ireland has published a general marine notice reminding masters and owners of their responsibilities when navigating Ireland's rivers, lakes and canals.

The notice includes information on vessel registration, canal permits, public berthing, smart cards for service payments, speed restrictions, water safety and other important details for anyone boating in Ireland North and South.

Published in Inland Waterways

#SHANNON NAVIGATION – Carrick-on-Shannon Rowing Club "Head of River" race will take place on Sat 18th Feb 2012 from 09.00 hrs until 17.00hrs. Waterways Ireland has advised Masters of vessels to proceed at slow speed and with minimum wash when passing this stretch of the navigation and to heed any advice or instructions issued by the regatta officials.

Published in Inland Waterways

#SHANNON NAVIGATION – ESB Generation works at Cloonlara bridge at the Ardnacrusha Headrace will continue until the end of February. Further information may be had from the Civil Engineering Manager: Tel: +353 (061) 350509 Mob: +353 (087) 2381104 Fax: +353 (01) 6384594

Published in Inland Waterways

#SHANNON – Work will commence on lock gate maintenance on the Shannon Navigation at Clondra Lock on the Clondara Canal. Waterways Ireland is advising masters and owners that work will commence on Thursday, 19 Jan and will be on-going for a period of four to five weeks. Alternative passage to Richmond Harbour maybe accessed via the Camlin river loop upstream of Tarmonbarry Lock.


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Published in Inland Waterways
Page 8 of 9

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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