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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Shannon Navigation

27th April 2011

Shannon Navigation

The mighty Shannon, the longest river in Ireland, was once the commercial backbone of Ireland. Today the river and its lakes are a bustling, colourful navigation with busy harbours, peaceful bays, lively towns and fascinating heritage and historical sites – it is a treasure waiting to be discovered. For all the latest news on Inland Waterways click here.
Published in Inland Waterways
Waterways Ireland, as part of a planned inland waterways programme of improvement works, has installed a floating Weir Boom across the weir at Clarendon Lock, Knockvicar on the Shannon Navigation.

Installing the 20m boom was initiated with assembly of the boom off-site in Rooskey. In early December, the drilling for the piles was facilitated by floating a piling rig to the site on pontoons. Piles are required to hold the Weir Boom in place. The boom was then floated to the site and secured in place. The works cost approximately €55,000.

Installation of the boom improves the amenity at Knockvicar in addition to lock gate replacement and upgraded lockhouse facilities which have been completed by Waterways Ireland in recent years.

The Weir Boom is a preventative measure installed by Waterways Ireland to protect boaters and their craft from being drawn over the weir. Space has been left to allow for the passage of canoeists. There will be no environmental impacts on fish or other wildlife from the installation or operation of the Weir Boom.

Published in Inland Waterways

The winner of the prestigious Taste of the Inland Waterways Award was revealed this week by Georgina Campbell as "Keenan's of Tarmonbarry".
Presenting the Taste of the Waterways Award to Keenan's of Tarmonbarry, Martin Dennany, Director of Marketing and Communications, Waterways Ireland stated "Keenan's of Tarmonbarry epitomises the waterway dining experience and I am delighted to present this Taste of the Waterways Award and to commend Georgina Campbell on her choice. With the recent completion of the link between the Royal Canal and the Shannon Navigation, we hope that many will take the opportunity to visit the area and to experience for themselves the delights of waterside hospitality at this fine establishment. Waterways Ireland is happy to sponsor this award and to recognise the contribution that businesses like Keenan's make to the tourism industry".
The Taste of the Waterways Award was first introduced in 2008 and runs in conjunction with "The Taste of Waterways" booklet, a publication produced by Waterways Ireland in partnership with Georgina Campbell highlighting the excellent hospitality of the waterway experience. The guide is free and updated regularly with Georgina's selection of establishments of all kinds serving food and hospitality all along the inland waterways.
Martin Dennany commenting on the guide stated "The judging criteria and standard of assessment for the Taste of the Waterways Georgina Campbell guide is very high, with selection made on merit alone: no payment is charged for entry, no payments accepted for advertising".
Georgina Campbell described Keenan's as "Just beside the bridge over the Shannon in Tarmonbarry, this well-run bar and restaurant has been a favourite watering hole for river folk for many years - and it makes a great place to break a journey between Dublin and the north-west. The range is wide, offering wholesome, hearty fare that pleases all age groups and includes very welcome traditional dishes. But it's for their steaks, above all, that people beat a path to Keenan's of Tarmonbarry - and why wouldn't they? Whether you go for a classic sirloin, a big juicy fillet, or their renowned steak sandwich, the steaks at this hospitable watering hole are not to be missed."

Published in Inland Waterways
Waterways Ireland has advised that technical difficulties are presently preventing the Portumna bridge on the Shannon navigation on the inland waterways from opening and closing correctly. Corrective action is being taken to rectify the problem. Any master planning a voyage on this stretch of the navigation should first contact the Bridge Keeper on 090-9741011 for the most recent information.
Published in Inland Waterways
Waterways Ireland has announced the commencement of the second phase of the improvements at the Killaloe Canal on the inland waterways.

The works on the Shannon Navigation at Killaloe involve the repair and widening of the canal wall. Flow Control Gates will be installed in the canal and new moorings have already been put in place to provide greater capacity. A further outcome of the flow control gates is the incorporation of a pedestrian footbridge creating a looped walk along the canal. The entire walkway will be resurfaced as part of the project.

The works have been designed by Waterways Ireland and will be undertaken by a contractor. The work will commence on the 13th September 2010 and is expected to be completed in March 2011. During this period the footpath between the R463 Killaloe to Scarriff Road and the canal will be closed.

The remedial works to the canal wall include the installation of approximately 400 m of sheet piles to incorporate the extension to the moorings and underpin the existing canal wall. The installation of boat pump-out facility and new mains pump chamber has been included in the programme.

When complete three walkways will link the newly installed floating moorings to the canal wall. The 250m of floating moorings were installed by Waterways Ireland earlier in the year in preparation for this work to take place.
Waterways Ireland would like to apologise for any inconvenience caused during the contract period. Queries about this work can be directed to the Waterways Ireland Western Regional Office in Scarriff, Tel 061 922033.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland has issued a reminder to users of the inland waterways on the Shannon Navigation that it is advised not to undertake a voyage if more than one turbine is operating, due to increased velocity of flow in the navigation which can be dangerous. The situation may also arise when flood conditions prevail.

Contact the lock keeper at Ardnacrusha (tel: 087-7972998) for information on the number of turbines in operation at Ardnacrusha before commencing transit of this part of the river. 

Published in Inland Waterways

This afternoon at 15.47hrs, Lough RNLI Derg lifeboat Toshiba Wave Warrior launched to assist eight persons on board a 31ft cruiser aground on Lough Derg.

At 15.30hrs on Monday afternoon August 2, Derg RNLI lifeboat was requested to launch following a sighting of a vessel aground off Crane Island close to Church Bay on the south-western shore of Lough Derg. The lifeboat with helm Eleanor Hooker, Peter Clark and Colin Knight on board, launched at 15.47hrs. Winds were south-westerly, Force 2 to 3. The lifeboat was alongside the casualty vessel at 15.58hrs and found all passengers to be safe and unharmed. They were asked to put on their lifejackets. The RNLI Lifeboat Training Officer, Fergal Kerney was afloat at the time and stood-by to reassure the persons on board until the lifeboat arrived. A RNLI crew member climbed aboard the cruiser and after he established that the vessel was not holed or damaged, it was taken off the rocks and towed out into safe water, where another check of steering and rudder was carried out. The cruiser then continued on its journey.

Lough Derg RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager, Charles Stanley-Smith commended the "the swift response the lifeboat crew and the professional manner in which the rescue was carried out".

The lifeboat returned to station and was ready for service again at 16.40hrs

Related Safety posts

RNLI Lifeboats in Ireland


Safety News


Rescue News from RNLI Lifeboats in Ireland


Coast Guard News from Ireland


Water Safety News from Ireland

Marine Casualty Investigation Board News

Marine Warnings

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Waterways Ireland advises that Sarsfield lock, Limerick is now fully operational.

 

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises Masters and Owners of reduced draft below weir level at moorings in Limerick as follows;

Custom House Quay

0.5m at inside moorings

1.3m at outside moorings

Arthur Quay Moorings

1.2m

 

Published in Inland Waterways
Page 9 of 9

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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