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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: ShannonErne Waterway

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels and water users that the flood levels are receding on the Shannon, Erne, Barrow and Lower Bann inland waterways.

Operations staff are now preparing the jetties, quays, slipways and facilities for reactivation as the floods recede.

It is anticipated that it will take up to three weeks for all jetties, quays, slipways and facilities to be fully operational.

Masters of vessels and water users should be aware that surfaces may be slippery, access to jetties can be difficult as gangways and pontoons are elevated, and flood damage may be encountered in some locations.

All should proceed with additional caution while the clean-up work is ongoing.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters and owners of vessels that the Shannon-Erne Waterway will be closed between Lock 12 and Lock 13 today, Tuesday 18 February, in order to facilitate the installation of a new footbridge.

It is estimated that the closure of the navigation shall be for no more than one day.

In addition, the service block and amenity area including jetties at Keshcarrigan, Co Leitrim shall remain closed to the public until 16 March in order to facilitate improvement works.

For further information contact, Waterways Ireland’s Carrick-on-Shannon office at 07196-50562.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advise masters that the winter mooring period for public harbours on the navigations will commence on 1 Nov 2019 and will end on 31 Mar 2020.

Masters wishing to avail of Winter Mooring are required to pay the winter mooring fee of €63.50 prior to 1 Nov 2019.

Masters are reminded that Bye-law 17 - the “5 consecutive days / 7 days in one month rule” - continues to apply for masters not availing of winter mooring.

Owners are also asked to note that vessels berthed in public harbours are at the owner's risk at all times and may be directed to other harbours as operational exigencies require.

Online registration for winter berths must be made here

Steps in the Winter Mooring process are:

  1. Apply online for Winter Mooring at a specific harbour
  2. Receive email approval / rejection / alternative location of application
  3. Follow link on approval email when received to pay winter mooring fee online
Published in Inland Waterways

#InlandWaters - Waterways Ireland has announced revised opening hours for the locks on the Shannon-Erne Waterway for 2018.

From next Thursday 29 March to Wednesday 16 May, locks will open from 9am to 6pm daily, extending to the full summer season opening hours of 9am to 8pm from Thursday 17 May till Wednesday 12 September.

In the late season, daily openings of 9am to 6pm are set for Thursday 12 September till Wednesday 31 October, dates and times to be confirmed. Winter hours will be advised towards the end of the season.

These changes apply seven days a week. The changes in operating hours will be seen in the early and late shoulder seasons only, and reflect usage patterns recorded by Waterways Ireland.

Throughout the season a minimum of two water patrollers will be working along the waterway to ensure that customer services can be provided as swiftly as possible.

For more information contact the SEW Operations Team in Carrick-on-Shannon at 071 965 0642.

Published in Inland Waterways

#ShannonErne - Waterways Ireland welcomed Canadian Ambassador Loyola Hearn and his wife Maureen to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the opening of the Shannon-Erne Waterway earlier this month.

The ambassador arrived in Leitrim village on a Waterways Ireland boat, and after meeting with representatives from Inland Fisheries Ireland and the Inland Waterways Association of Ireland at the local marina, he planted a maple tree as a symbol of strength and endurance in Canada.

Waterways Ireland chief executive Dawn Livingstone led the ambassador on a visit to Glenview Folk Museum alongside Lock 5 of the waterway, after which he visited Riversdale Barges, where he took in a barge building project with owner Graham Thomas.

On a traditional barge, the ambassador and his party travelled on to Ballinamore where they were met at the community marina by Sadie McGovern of Ballinamore Development Association, Locaboat hire boat company manager Phillipe Ducont and children from three local schools.

Ambassador Hearn was joined by Livingstone in presenting certificates to St Brigids National School in Drumcong and Scoil Brid and St Patrick's National Schools in Ballinamore for their work on the Waterways Ireland Education Programme.

Canada was a major contributor to the International Fund for Ireland that covered the costs of the Shannon-Erne Waterway, which opened in 1994 as the first corss-border waterway project in Ireland.

In related news, Waterways Ireland is now selling a Navigational Guide to the Shannon and Erne Waterways, a comprehensive A3 booklet with section-by-section guides complete with drawings, photos, instructions and navigation tips.

The new guide is available from the Waterways Ireland online shop for €15.

Published in Inland Waterways

#InlandWaterways - Waterways Ireland advises masters and owners of vessels that repairs to the lock and gates at Lock 1 Corraquill on the Shannon-Erne Waterway in Co Fermanagh which began on 29 January have now been completed.

Published in Inland Waterways

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020