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Displaying items by tag: Something Fishy

Two young poets from Tipperary and Carlow respectively have scooped the top prizes in this year’s Something Fishing national poetry competition, organised by Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) in conjunction with the Blackrock Education Centre.

Orlaith Timmons, a fifth-class pupil from Moycarkey National School in Thurles, and Aoibhé Kieran, a sixth-class pupil from Ballon National School in Carlow, each won the top prize in their categories for their nature-themed poetry.

Earlier this year, primary school students around the country were challenged by IFI to create an acrostic poem, where the first letter of each line spells out the word ‘STREAM’ (for an English-language poem) or ‘SRUTH’ (for an Irish-language poem).

Announcing the winners, Environment Eamon Ryan said: “These are gorgeous poems that really capture the joy these young people are experiencing spending time in nature. I’d like to congratulate all our budding young poets on their achievements this year.

“Through this environmental competition, primary school children have shown huge enthusiasm for nature, fish, other wildlife and the world around us. Improving our children’s knowledge and understanding of biodiversity, through initiatives like this one, will be an important part of our climate action efforts.”

The competition is part of the wider Something Fishy Educational Programme, aimed at primary school pupils aged between 10 and 13. It educates students on the importance of biodiversity and on having sustainable habitats, fish and angling.

Despite school closures during the 2020/2021 academic year, online content was still available to pupils and teachers through the official website at somethingfishy.ie including lesson plans and activity sheets based on the theme of the life cycle of salmon — bradán as Gaeilge.

From over 100 entries, the judging panel also selected runners-up from Ballon National School and Bennekerry National School (Carlow), Scoil Mhuire National School in Corofin (Galway), Scoil Cholmcille in Greencastle (Donegal) and St Canice’s Girls National School in Finglas (Dublin).

Praising the young winners and their schools, Suzanne Campion, IFI’s head of business development, said: “By researching and writing about fish, wildlife and rivers from an early age, primary school children are learning really important lessons about biodiversity and how we all have a role to play in protecting and conserving our environment.

“Congratulations to all our winners and our thanks to everyone who took part in this year’s competition. I’d also like to thank all the teachers, principals and school staff who supported the Something Fishy programme and competition over the last year.”

The overall winners will receive a fishing kit to the value of €100 and runners-up will receive an outdoor field trip kit to the value of €50. Third-placed winners and special category winners will receive goody bags.

“This year we received fantastic entries from budding poets and nature enthusiasts. With a total of 114 entries in the competition for its second year running, it is encouraging to see the interest amongst young people across Ireland,” said Dr Susan Gibney, director of the Blackrock Education Centre.

“Competitions like this not only help with student’s literacy skills but also expands their knowledge of the biodiversity that exists around them in our lakes and rivers.”

All winning poems from the 2021 Something Fishy national poetry competition can be read at somethingfishy.ie/schools

Published in Angling

Primary school pupils across Ireland are once again being asked to get poetic as the Something Fishy poetry competition returns for 2021.

Started last year by Inland Fisheries Ireland and the Blackrock Education Centre to keep pupils engaged while out of the classroom during coronavirus restrictions, the contest asks school children to write a short verse about fish and their environment.

This year, however, the poem must be an acrostic, in which the first letter of each line spells out a word — in this case ‘STREAM’.

Pupils are also encouraged to illustrate their poems with their own artwork to complete their submissions across three categories — fifth class, sixth class and Irish language — and be in with a chance to win some great prizes.

These prizes include fishing kits to the value €100 and outdoor field trip kits worth as much as €50.

Suzanne Campion, head of business development at Inland Fisheries Ireland, said: ‘We are delighted to launch this competition for the second year in a row and we are looking forward to seeing the imaginative works the young poets create.

“There are lots of fun and interactive resources available on www.somethingfishy.ie to help inspire budding poets.”

Only one entry is permitted per student and it is to be original work. The closing date for entries is Friday 28 May.

Parents/guardians are being asked to email the entry to [email protected] and to include the student’s name, class (5th or 6th) and school name and address.

The winning illustrated poems will be chosen by a panel of judges, and winners will be announced on Friday 18 June.

Published in Angling

Six young poets have been selected as winners of the ‘Let’s fish’ national poetry competition which took place earlier this summer.

The contest was organised by Inland Fisheries Ireland in conjunction with the Blackrock Education Centre, to keep pupils engaged while out of the classroom during coronavirus restrictions.

Entries were received from across Ireland under the title ‘Let’s fish’, with pupils encouraged to research the Something Fishy online resource and asked to write a five-line poem on the topic.

And the poems revealed how much fish and fishing means to our younger generation, IFI says.

In the Fifth Class category, Oran from CBS Primary School in Dundalk took first prize, followed by Ethan of Scoil Naomh Buithe in Monasterboice, Co Louth and Philip of Scoil Réalt na Mara in Tuosist, Co Kerry.

Meanwhile, Millie of St Patrick’s NS in Greystones, Co Wicklow placed first in the Sixth Class category, while second prize went to Leah of Sion Mills Primary School in Co Tyrone and third to Dara from Scoil Phadraig in Westport.

IFI says it will share the winning entries across its social media platforms over the coming weeks.

Published in Angling

Doora National School from Ennis, Co Clare has been named winner of Inland Fisheries Ireland’s (IFI) national Something Fishy contest for 2019.

The students from sixth class were presented with the Something Fishy perpetual trophy by Pat Breen TD, Minister of State for Trade, Employment, Business, EU Digital Single Market and Data Protection, at Treacys West County Hotel in Ennis yesterday (Monday 25 November).

Doora National School received the national accolade after being commended for their Something Fishy blog project, which saw them complete artwork on the life cycle of a salmon, report on a field trip they took with local fisheries officers and produce an exercise book.

The blog was accessible to their peers and members of the public on Somethingfishy.ie with a view to sharing their learning experiences and to increasing awareness of their fisheries resource in the local community.

It followed months of engagement by the students in the education programme which saw them work with IFI’s Fisheries Officers from the Shannon River Basin District to learn about their local fisheries resource.

The winners were chosen to go forward to represent their region by Clare Education Centre in June.

During the 2018-2019 academic year, 104 national schools and 12 education centres took part in the fisheries education programme which reached over 2,000 students across the country.

As part of Something Fishy, students learn about fish and the environment, enjoying classroom based activities as well as a practical field trip with fisheries officers. The Something Fishy programme is an initiative of IFI in partnership with Blackrock Education Centre.

Speaking about the Something Fishy award, Minister Pat Breen said it “is particularly special as we celebrate the International Year of the Salmon in 2019, an initiative which hopes to raise awareness around the different challenges that face the Salmon species today”.

‘The level of creativity, passion for learning and enthusiasm shown in their project stood out’

IFI chief executive Dr Ciaran Byrne said: “The students and teachers of Doora National School submitted an impressive project for assessment. The level of creativity, passion for learning and enthusiasm shown in their project stood out and deserves recognition at this national level.

“We would like to thank Clare Education Centre and our partners in Blackrock Education Centre for their support in bringing the programme to the high standard that it is today.”

Ross Darmody, teacher of the winning class in Doora National School, said: “We are proud of the students here at Doora National School for their inspiring enthusiasm to engage with and learn about the fisheries environment and its species.

“The programme is cross-curricular and draws together geography, science and ICT as well as ensuring that the learning is fun for everyone through the interactive online ‘Something Fishy’ resources.

“As a school we look forward to working with Inland Fisheries Ireland again in the future to bring this programme to even more students.”

Published in Angling

Letterkenny Educate Together National School has been named winner of the national education programme Something Fishy for 2019.

The students from fifth class were presented with the Something Fishy perpetual trophy and a monetary prize by Minister for Education Joe McCue at their school yesterday (Monday 19 November).

The pupils received the national accolade for their project called Save Our Schools (SOS), which saw the class build a website aimed at engaging other children and young people to learn about fish and the importance of protecting the fisheries resource for angling and inland fishing.

The webpage included digital games and video content, all devised and produced by the children themselves.

During the 2017-2018 academic year, 99 national schools and 10 education centres took part in the Something Fishy programme, reaching some 3,000 students.

The Something Fishy education programme is an initiative of Inland Fisheries Ireland, in partnership with Blackrock Education Centre, which allows students to learn about fish and the environment in a local context.

Students enjoy classroom-based activities as well as practical field trips with fisheries officers as part of the programme, which is promoted and delivered by education centres nationwide. In addition, students compile and submit projects on their learning for assessment by an independent judging panel.

Teachers and students participating in the Something Fishy programme explore eight different lessons on the fisheries resource, after which they receive a visit from inland fisheries Oofficers who introduce them to their local river and the fish and invertebrates who live within in. Since its inception in 2005, over 50,000 students have participated in the programme.

Minister McHugh said: “This year’s award is particularly special as we embark, in conjunction with countries all over the world, on the International Year of the Salmon to celebrate the shared cultural and mythological place of salmon in societies around the globe.

He added: “I am particularly proud that Donegal, and especially the Letterkenny area, has built up an excellent pedigree in this competition with this year’s champions following in the footsteps of Gartan NS who won the title last year.”

Inland Fisheries Ireland chief executive Dr Ciaran Byrne said: “Letterkenny Educate Together really impressed the judging panel with their use of digital communications to highlight significant conservation messages for their peers. I would like to congratulate the children and their teachers, Nakita Burke and Cliona Marley, for showcasing important learnings about the local fisheries environment in such an effective manner.”

Jacqui Dillon, director of Donegal Education Centre, said the county’s second win in two years “is reflective of the commitment of the teachers involved and the keen interest they have engendered in their pupils”.

Published in Angling

#SomethingFishy - Pupils at Scoil Chroí Naofa in Bunninadden, Sligo have been named the national winners of Inland Fisheries Ireland’s Something Fishy competition for 2016 at an event in Sligo’s Clarion Hotel yesterday (Wednesday 12 October).

The winning group of 24 children from the school’s senior class take home the National Something Fishy Award and €700 for their animated short on the life cycle of the salmon – selected by an independent judging panel comprising fisheries officers and education staff.

Along with their teacher Adrian Ormsby, the class edited and produced the digital and artistic photo story during the previous school term.



The ‘Something Fishy’ programme is an educational initiative of Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) in partnership with Blackrock Education Centre, which allows students to learn about fish and the environment in a local context.

The 2016 programme saw 3,776 children taking part in 118 schools and 11 education centres nationwide. Students were invited to submit project entries into the competition with this year’s entries addressing the theme ‘Focus on Learning’.

“The standard of entry to this year’s Something Fishy competition was particularly high and it is fantastic to have so many children engaged on our fisheries resource,” said IFI chief executive Dr Ciaran Byrne.

“Something Fishy gives children an opportunity to learn valuable lessons about the importance of protecting and conserving the aquatic environment but perhaps more importantly, they are also empowered to share their learnings with their peers via digital projects which can be enjoyed by all.”

Bernie Burke, principal of Scoil Chroí Naofa, described the win as “a fantastic achievement by the students involved who have thoroughly enjoyed taking part in the programme.

“They have discovered the magical world within our waterways and enjoyed learning all about the aquatic environment. I would like to congratulate each of them and their teacher Mr Ormsby on all their hard work.”

Since the inception of Something Fishy in 2005, some 50,000 children have participated in the initiative which aims to promote interest and understanding in fish and their habitats.

As part of the educational programme, IFI fisheries officers visit schools and provide classroom-based assistance, with a full range of resources for teachers and children also available on the Something Fishy website.

Together, they explore the themes of fish, habitats, angling, water environment and the protection and conservation of Ireland’s rivers and lakes.

Aside from school-based learning, fisheries officers take students into the field to give them some practical experience of their work.

Published in Marine Wildlife

#Angling - Fifth and sixth class pupils from St John’s National School in Longford have been named national winners of the Inland Fisheries Ireland’s (IFI) Something Fishy competition for 2014 for their class project ‘Angling at One’.

At a prize giving ceremony held yesterday (17 October) in Carrick on Shannon Education Centre, the Longford primary pupils were awarded for their self-made interpretation of RTÉ’s Live at One, featuring quiz shows, music, dance, arts and cooking, all related to angling, rod and line fishing, as well as the role of IFI.

Joanne Bowers, Principal, St John’s NS principal Joanne Bowers was presented with the perpetual trophy by Marian Harkin MEP. “I am delighted to accept this award on behalf of the students of St John’s National School in Longford, who have demonstrated an extraordinary degree of creativity, organisation and technical know-how, in their creation of their winning project," she said.

“I would like to thank the staff of Inland Fisheries Ireland, who supported the delivery of the Something Fishy educational programme at St John’s, including highly engaging presentations and field trips which really made the subject of angling and conservation of rivers and lakes come to life for the students.”

The competition has been running since 2005 nationwide and this year over 130 schools took part, reaching almost 4000 individual students.

Something Fishy is an educational resource originally designed and promoted by the Central and Regional Fisheries Boards, now Inland Fisheries Ireland, in conjunction with Blackrock Educational Centre.

Speaking at yesterday's event, IFI chief executive Dr Ciaran Byrne said: “Something Fishy is something that IFI is extremely proud to be a part of. In a typical year, we bring the programme to around 100 schools across the country. And every year our staff are amazed by the willingness of the children to learn, and their passion for our inland fisheries resource.”

Those addressing the attendees at yesterday's event included Anna Feely, chair of Carrick on Shannon Education Centre; Catherine Martin, director of Carrick on Shannon Education Centre; and Pat Seaver Director of Blackrock Education Centre – all educationalists who applauded the high production standards of St John’s NS’s winning project.

Published in Angling
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#MarineScience - The Marine Institute invites fifth and sixth class primary school pupils to take part in Exploring the XTRA-Ordinary, a new writing competition where the winner and their class will be invited to visit Ireland’s national maritime research vessel Celtic Explorer in Galway in early December.

Students are asked to get creative and write a poem about the XTRA-Ordinary exploration on the RV Celtic Explorer and demonstrate their understanding of Ireland’s marine life and ocean.   

The winner and their class will be given a tour on board the RV Celtic Explorer and get to meet the crew and scientists that work on board, as well as see the Remotely Operated Vehicle Holland 1.   

Students will also get the opportunity to visit the Dry Lab, where scientists collect data from the ocean that is used to produce maps of Ireland’s seabed, and the Wet Lab where scientists collect marine samples and research marine species that live in the ocean.

A short-list of the entries will be displayed and winners will be announced at the 2013 Galway Science and Technology Festival that takes place at NUI Galway on 24 November from 10am to 6pm.

Entries must be sent to Cushla Dromgool-Regan, The RV Celtic Explorer’s  XTRA-Ordinary Writing Competition, Communications Office, The Marine Institute, Rinville, Oranmore, Co Galway. The closing date for entries is Thursday 21 November 2013.

For more information about the competition see HERE. And teachers can find lesson plans about poetry, images and footage of marine species and habitats and the activities of the RV Celtic Explorer on the Marine Institute website HERE.

In other schools news, Ayr Hill National School in Ramelton, Co Donegal took the top honour in the 'Something Fishy' education programme for 2013.

Students and staff from the school visited the Donegal Education Centre on Friday 25 October to receive their national award – won in the last two years by schools in Co Wexford - for their class project on the River Leannan and the threat posed to it by invasive species.

At the award ceremony, Ayr Hill principal Hilary McNutt was presented with the perpetual trophy by Inland Fisheries Ireland chief Dr Ciaran Byrne and a class trophy from the IFI board chair Brendan O’Mahony. 

Donegal GAA player Mark McHugh was also on hand to add his congratulations and present each student with an individual ‘goodie bag’. 

McNutt praised the work of her pupils, the Education Centre and IFI staff Owen Kelly and Paul Burke, whose interest and passion for their work enthused and engaged the children with the project.

The River Leannan project involved preparatory class work and the pupils visiting eight sites along the river from source to sea taking physical readings as well as looking at land use, flora and fauna and in particular watching out for ‘alien species'.

Published in Marine Science

#INLAND WATERWAYS - Ballygarrett National School in Co Wexford fended off competition from 125 other primaries nationwide to win the 'Something Fishy' education programme for 2012.

The school claimed the award and a cheque for €500 for their project ‘Fishylympics’, a quirky blend of the Olympics, The X Factor and well known public figures,

and today receive their award and cheque for €500 from Minister Fergus O Dowd at Wexford Education Centre, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford.

Presented on DVD, 'Fishylympics' is a dramatisation of the obstacles our native fish have to overcome to survive and win in the Fishylympics.

"I am convinced that wonderful learning experiences have been achieved and solid work produced on the basis of what I have seen, you have demonstrated imagination and an extensive level of understanding," said Minister Fergus O'Dowd, who presented the pupils with their prize at the Wexford Education Centre in Enniscorthy last Friday.

Four-time All-Ireland winner and Wexford camogie all-star Catherine O'Loughlin was also on hand to present each child with a goody bag.

She noted Wexford's two-in-a-row victory in the ‘Something Fishy’ competition – Donard National School took top place last year for their ecosystem-themed musical - and urged other schools in Wexford to take up the challenge set by Minister O'Dowd to go for a third.

Something Fishy is an educational resource originally designed and promoted by Inland Fisheries Ireland, in conjunction with the Blackrock Educational Centre, and is aimed at at fifth and sixth class pupils.

Originally based on the life cycle of salmon, it allows students to explore water, fish, fish stocks, angling, invasive species, conservation of rivers and lakes, and fish as part of the food chain.

Something Fishy now covers all fish species and invasive species. As well as class-based work, fisheries officers take students into the field to get hands-on experience of their work.

The competition has been run over the last seven years nationwide, and this year more than 120 schools took part, reaching over 5,000 individual students.

Published in Inland Waterways
Pupils at Donard National School fended off competition from across Ireland to win a coveted prize in the Inland Fisheries Ireland 'Something Fishy' competition for 2011, the New Ross Standard reports.
Wexford footballer Brian Malone presented fifth and sixth class pupils at Donard NS with goodie bags and an award for their entry 'Something Fishy - The Musical', which features songs and dances about the ecosystem of their local River Boro.
Dr Ciaran Byrne, IFI chief executive Dr Ciaran Byrne, who was on hand at the prizegiving ceremony at the Wexford Education Centre in Enniscorthy, commented on all entrants: “You guys are the caretakers of this environment and if you take this message with you today we will have a much better environment in 20 years’ time.”
More than 160 schools and 7,000 children took part this year in the 'Something Fishy' initiative, which is now in its sixth year of encouraging primary schoolchildren to explore different aspects of fish life.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Pupils at Donard National School fended off competition from across Ireland to win a coveted prize in the Inland Fisheries Ireland 'Something Fishy' competition for 2011, the New Ross Standard reports.

Wexford footballer Brian Malone presented fifth and sixth class pupils at Donard NS with goodie bags and an award for their entry 'Something Fishy - The Musical', which features songs and dances about the ecosystem of their local River Boro.

Dr Ciaran Byrne, IFI chief executive Dr Ciaran Byrne, who was on hand at the prizegiving ceremony at the Wexford Education Centre in Enniscorthy, commented on all entrants: “You guys are the caretakers of this environment and if you take this message with you today we will have a much better environment in 20 years’ time.”

More than 160 schools and 7,000 children took part this year in the 'Something Fishy' initiative, which is now in its sixth year of encouraging primary schoolchildren to explore different aspects of fish life. 

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Inland Waterways
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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