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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Storm Emma

Works to repair storm damage to the East and West Piers in Dun Laoghaire Harbour during Storm Emma two years ago have now been completed, bar restoration of the sun shelter on the East Pier.

Movement restrictions to control the spread of coronavirus slowed the final weeks of works, which involved repairs to coastal defences on the East Pier as reported on Afloat.ie in early March.

Now Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council has provided an update of the repairs progress over a number of phases, from emergency works to reconstruction of the East Pier’s upper level wall, replacing 400 tonnes of rock armour washed away in the storm, and shoring up the West Pier’s roundhead resentment.

Restoration of the East Pier’s sun shelter remains outstanding and the council says it is features in its Capital Projects plan awaiting funding to proceed.

Works to repair damage at the East Pier, Dun Laoghaire Harbour in Dublin Bay, that began last year on coastal defences should be completed in the coming weeks, writes Jehan Ashmore.

According to Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council the works to replenish rock-armour from the damage caused by Storm Emma in 2018 should be completed by the end of March.

As Afloat previously reported a barge laden with 1,700 tonnes of Cornish granite boulders are being used to repair the outside of the East Pier.

Such work to position the rocks where required to shore-up coastal defences, is clearly evident when seen from the shores of Scotsman Bay as the new rocks are grey in colour compared to the surrounding slopes along the East Pier.

It is almost a fortnight since the barge towed by tug, Vanguard, departed Dun Laoghaire Harbour and back to the UK. DLRCoCo also confirmed to Afloat that this was the only shipment used in the project where contractors hired by the council are using heavy machinery.

The machinery involving digger/grabbers had to be tranported by sea (landing craft, James) from within the harbour to the outside of the East Pier due to accessiblility reasons.

Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council have engaged L&M Keating Ltd to carry out further repairs to the end of the West Pier and behind the sun shelter on the East Pier of Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

The works include repairing damage to the revetments, and replacing rock armour removed by Storm Emma in March 2018. The council expects these works to be completed by Christmas.

Members of the public are requested to obey safety signage and stay clear of the works areas on both piers.

Afloat.ie understand that a budget shortfall resulting from a lower than expected insurance payout over damage sustained during Storm Emma means that some works, unclosing the rebuilding of the East Pier’s sun shelter, cannot be completed at this time.

#Holyhead - The north Wales marina in Holyhead wrecked in a storm which saw dozens of vessels sunk or damaged is to receive a £100,000 Government cash injection to help with the ongoing clean-up.

Storm Emma reports Daily News, battered the coast in March of this year, wreaking severe damage on Holyhead Marina as well as around 75 vessels.

Since then, significant progress has been made to clean up the area, with an estimated 40 tonnes of polystyrene and 3,000 litres of oil recovered from the marina and neighbouring beaches.

This has been made possible thanks to the efforts of a multi-agency team involving Anglesey Council, NRW, and the Coastguard among others, and the time and dedication shown by local volunteers.

During a visit to the marina this morning (MAY 10) First Minister Carwyn Jones said: “From day one agencies and volunteers have worked tirelessly on the clean-up and I saw for myself the dedication and professionalism of those involved. I thank them for all they have done and continue to do.

To read further comments by the Welsh First Minister, click here. 

Last month on the other side of the Irish Sea a group of cadets visiting Greystones as previousy reported ironically found debris from the damaged marina washed ashore

Published in ISORA

Flooding in South Dublin coastal towns and villages came when high tides arrived at lunch time today.

In Bulloch Harbour in Dalkey, on the southern tip of Dublin Bay, storm waves swept through the harbour as Bay waters threatened the top of the quay.

At nearby Coliemore Harbour a boat was capsized in the small harbour in Dalkey Sound

Coliemore harbourColiemore harbour Photo: Michael Chester

At Dun Laoghaire Harbour, boats are snug in the country's biggest marina but there is reported damage to pontoons and boats moored elsewhere.

At Seapoint, in Monkstown, County Dublin the shoreline railway there resembles a canal as Storm Emma continues to rage this afternoon.

The scene in Sandycove, County Dublin where mountainous seas caused local flooding.

Snow 2018 Day2 692Waves pound Newtownsmith at Sandycove. Photo: Michael Chester

Despite warnings to the public to stay out of the water, a woman swimmer had to be rescued from the harbour in Sandycove.

Earlier today, as Afloat.ie reported here, breaking waves in north Dublin at Howth have caused damaged to a  pierside shed where some historic yachts are stored. 

Today's high tide at noon added to Howth's storm problems with the northeast gale little eased, and the waves continuously sweeping over the East Pier. While the actual damage timeline is still confused, it may well be that the worst of the destruction to the sheds at the end of the pier housing seven of the Howth 17s did not occur until around 1.30pm today, with reports of at least two boats seriously damaged

howth harbour today1Howth harbour today Photo: W M Nixon

Published in Dublin Bay
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020