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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Storms

Works have recently begun to repair damage in Dun Laoghaire Harbour caused by a storm from almost two years ago, however further bad weather looms as Storm Dennis is to sweep in this weekend, writes Jehan Ashmore.

As Afloat reported in November, a landing-craft vessel in the harbour assisted a contractor which Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council tasked to repair damage notably at the East Pier following Storm Emma in March 2018. Due to access issues, diggers were transported by sea to land ashore on both the seaward sides of the West and East Piers.

Ironically Storm Ciara made its presence felt in regards to repair works required at the East Pier. As Afloat also reported, a section of the pier's revetments removed by Storm Emma were due to receive replenished rock armour. This work was expected to be completed by Christmas, however, it was only last week that a tug towing a barge laden with 1,700 tonnes of Cornish granite arrived at the harbour.

As the weather abated, the tug Vanguard which made the delivery voyage, was joined in the harbour on Wednesday by Wicklow based tug, AMS Retriever to assist in the short-distance towing operation. The tugs departed St. Michael's Pier along with the barge that was positioned in Scotman's Bay in close proximity off the East Pier.

Barge rocks Dun laoghaire 0372The Vanguard with accompanying tugs offloads its rock cargo at the back of Dun Laoghaire's East Pier Photo: Afloat

According to DLRCoCo, the works at the East Pier are scheduled to be completed by the end of February.

On a related note to the weather in the harbour, Storm Ciara led to three Belgium registered trawlers forced to take refuge by sheltering within the harbour.

The trio of beam-trawlers berthed alongside Carlisle Pier involved Avatar (Z-333) and rafted alongside Francine (Z 90). While the third trawler, De Marie Louise (Z 47) berthed ahead but nearer to the pierhead.

As weather conditions improved, the trawlers departed back into the Irish Sea.

Published in Dublin Bay

#WhiskeyPlant - A cargoship in Scotland was delayed in loading distillery tanks bound for an Irish whiskey plant due to recent storms hitting the UK coast, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The 81m short-sea trader Scot Explorer (1996/2,521dwt) was stuck in Buckie Harbour. The port in north-east Scotland on the Moray Firth, east of Inverness, is from where Scotline made its first shipment in 1979 bringing logs to Germany, before relocating to a port in Sweden.

According to the shipping company the extremely rough weather prevented Scot Explorer in loading whiskey distillery tanks, even in the shelter of the harbour. The project cargo was bound for Jameson's Old Distillery plant in Midleton, Co, Cork.

Last month Afloat reported on Scotline’s latest ship acquisition of the 90m Odertal, which was renamed Scot Leader which has a 4,507dwt.

The newcomer joins the Romford, England based fleet which specialise in the transportation of sawn timber products. This involves a network of liner services linking the UK, Ireland, Scandinavia and Germany.

Published in Ports & Shipping

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore. 

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.