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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Tug

Any ship coming into Dublin Port in today’s gales after crossing the Irish Sea will have felt mighty glad to get into the shelter of the port. But for P & O’s European Endeavour late this morning, there was the additional tricky matter of getting turned in the river without taking out the Poolbeg Y & BC marina, and then going astern into her berth in the Alexandra Basin writes W M Nixon.

Fortunately the renowned Dublin Port push-me-pull-you tug Shackleton (one of the pair with her sister-ship Beaufort) was on hand to show what she can do when a real heave in any direction is needed, and though it took time, the Endeavour was lined up and slid neatly into place.

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Shackleton sets to her work. The wind freshened markedly as the manoeuvre was under way. Photo: W M Nixon

Many Afloat.ie visitors will be familiar with the “Ballet of the Tugs” performed by Shackleton and Beaufort during the Dublin Riverfests. But as this morning’s task showed, while the tugs may well be game to perform as an all-singing all-dancing act, when there’s work to be done they’re more than able for it, as this sequence shows. The photos as usual fail to capture a sense of the real strength of the breeze – Dublin Airport was recording 40 knots with 50 knot gusts, and it got fresher after that, a real winter gale. But when summer comes, doubtless we’ll see the ballet again, and we sign off with a pic of that.

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Summertime in Dublin. The hard-working Shackleton takes time out for a spot of Strictly with her sister-ship Beaufort. Photo: W M Nixon

Published in Dublin Port
Tagged under

#INLAND WATERWAYS - Waterways Ireland has taken delivery of its third tug boat from Mooney Boats of Killybegs.

Designed by Marine Design International, the Inish Fendra is an 11.2-metre LOA steel-built tug which has been specifically tailored for operation on the Shannon-Erne waterway system.

Its design bears many similarities to the Inis Muillin, which was delivered by Mooney Boats in 2010.

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The new tug, Inisfendra built by Mooney Boats of Donegal

According to Maritime Journal, the design process "involved significant input from the vessel operators and managers combined with the latest technology and ideas from the designers and builders to improve on efficiency" and safety.

A key feature of the Inish Fendra is its 3,500-litre ballast tank and pumping system, which is operated by the push of a button and can reduce the vessel's air draft by 0.2m.

Maritime Journal has much more on the Inish Fendra HERE.

Published in Inland Waterways

As the Russian 'A' class Mir passed the LE Aoife off Dunmore East in mid-morning, the largest tall ship of the festival headed the start of the Parade of Sail, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Crowds left their cars in fields outside Dunmore East and descended into the harbour and surrounding headlands to witness the highlight of the four-day festival. Adding to the scene were the numerous leisure-craft, yachts and intrepid kayakers that gathered to greet the procession which took some two hours to pass the fishing harbour.

No sooner had the fully-rigged ship Mir had slipped beyond the anchored naval vessel that the gaff schooner Johanna Lucretia, under full sail came closer into view. She was closely followed by the Ocean Youth Trust Scotland's Bermudan cutter Alba Explorer.

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The Russian 'A' class Mir passing the LE Aoife off Dunmore East. Photo: Jehan Ashmore

Of all the 45 tallships participating the Columbian Navy's barque ARC Gloria presented the most colourful entrant. She proudly flew a large horizontal tricolor of yellow, blue and red representing the South American nation.

When it came to the turn of the Europa to pass the LE Aoife, the tug Bargarth gave a wonderful send-off with the traditional display of water jets shooting sky-high, nearly reaching the top of the three-masted barque.

Marking the tail-end of the parade was the Jubilee Sailing Trust's Lord Nelson, another barque that departed the estuary with the Hook Head Lighthouse forming a majestic backdrop.

At this stage several of the large tallships could be seen on the far horizon in preperation to the start of the first race leg of this years Tall Ships Races....next port of call Greenock!

More Tall Ships Photos

Dublin Hosts Tall Ships in 2012

View Waterford's Parade of Sail Photo Gallery Here

Published in Tall Ships

Lord Mayor of Dublin and Admiral of Dublin Port, Gerry Breen, performed the 523 year-old "Casting of the Spear" ceremony in Dublin Bay on midsummer's day, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The 'casting' for yesterdays' re-enactment by the Lord Mayor took place onboard the Dublin port Company tug Shackleton.

From the deck of the Spanish built 50-tonne bollard pull tractor-tug, a spear was launched into the sky and fell deep into the cold water's of Dublin Bay. The ceremony once again marked the position of the city boundaries eastwards.

The medieval tradition of 'Casting of the Spear' dates back to 1488 when the then Lord Mayor, Thomas Mayler, set out on his horse to ride the city's boundaries.

According to historical records he rode out onto the strand as far as a man might ride and from there he cast a spear into the sea. At that time, casting the spear demonstrated the extent of the city boundaries eastwards.

The tradition marks one of many significant moments in Dublin Port's long history since its establishment as a trading post some 1,200 years ago.

Published in Dublin Port
The Irish flagged general cargo-ship Arklow Raider which went aground when departing Drogheda Port on Tuesday, remains stuck on a sandbank tonight, writes Jehan Ashmore.
In strong south-east gales the 90-metre vessel with a cargo of cement bound for Swansea, ran aground off the port's north breakwater. There were plans to tow the 2,999 gross tonnes vessel this morning but no large tugs were available to assist. It is expected that a tug will arrive at the scene tomorrow.
Meanwhile the crew of the Arklow Raider remain onboard the vessel which is in no danger. The dry-bulk cargo ship vessel is owned by Arklow Shipping Ltd and is one of nine 'R' class sisters built by the Dutch shipbuilders Barkmeijer Stroobos B.V.

The Drogheda Port Company's patrol launch, Boyne Protector has been monitoring the situation as the Arklow Raider lies close to the entrance of the Co. Louth port.

Published in Ports & Shipping

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020

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