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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Tug Master

Dan Cross, Master on the tug Svitzer Trident which operates in the UK, has been awarded the Merchant Navy Medal for Meritorious Service.

This is the highest medal of honour within the British maritime sector and is given for significant contributions and exceptional devotion to the industry.

Daniel Cross, in his 30th year with us, has been a Master with Svitzer in Liverpool and Milford Haven (news) since 2007, is awarded for his services to the towage sector and devotion to the preservation of the iconic SS Daniel Adamson, a historic steam ship, which first set sail in 1903.

Dan took on the challenge to preserve history and bought the steam ship for £1 in 2004 when it was just 48 hours away from being scrapped. He built a team of one hundred volunteers to restore it to its former glory and after twelve years of hard work, including successfully securing £3.6m in lottery funding, the SS Daniel Adamson now sails around the (inland waterways) of north-west England. 

Through Dan’s restoration efforts, he has supported young people from all backgrounds and abilities to learn, participate and eventually volunteer as part of the ship’s crew and go on to lead careers in engineering and across the maritime sector.  

The iconic 173tn SS Daniel Adamson previously transported cargo, passengers and even royalty across the northwest and was also armed for battle in the First World War. Historical figures, such as Prince George of Denmark, are known to have boarded the ship.

Commenting on the award, Dan says: “I am deeply honoured to be awarded this wonderful Medal alongside some prestigious recipients over the years. I played a small part in saving and returning the Daniel Adamson back to operational condition for future generations to enjoy and benefit from.”

“As a key part of ensuring goods keep flowing in and out of the ports and harbours in the UK it is great that services to harbour towage is recognised and the work we do can be remembered through vessels like the Daniel Adamson.”

Dan will receive his medal in November at a ceremony at Trinity House, London.

Published in Historic Boats

Afloat has noted that the Dublin Port Company is currently recruiting for roles at sea and those ashore as part of efforts to achieve the port's Masterplan: 2012-2040, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The objectives of such job roles, requires skilled, dedicated and motivated staff and DPC invites applications for Tug Master and Marine Operatives.

For further information visit the port's website careers page by clicking this link for full job specifications.

Closing date for applications is Friday 21st August 2020. For much more details consult the links given throughout. 

Afloat adds the port operates its own pair of custom-built tugs, the Irish flagged Beaufort and Shackleton introduced just over a decade go in early 2010 as part of a port related work-boat upgrade of its fleet. A Spanish shipyard built the pair and costing €6m apiece. 

The Voith Schneider propelled tugs each have a 53t bollard pull capacity and formed Phase 2 of an upgrade programme to modernise by replacing ageing tonnage. The then new tugs along with other port work related craft were introduced a decade ago in an overall €16m investment by the port company.

More on the tug newbuilds were featured in Ships Monthly, June 2010 issue as part of the publication's 'Waterfront' column. 

In addition Beaufort featured in 'Maritime' Dalkey series of the Dalkey Community Council Newsletter (Feb) 2016, see: p.13.

Published in Jobs

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020